The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail, Clayton Christensen
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Clayton Christensen

The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail

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Get these bestsellers together: one of the most influential business books of all time—with a bonus HBR article that will inspire you to find meaning and happiness in your life by applying the principles of businessThe Innovator’s Dilemma His work is cited by the world’s best known thought leaders, from Steve Jobs to Malcolm Gladwell. In his bestselling book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, innovation expert Clayton M. Christensen introduced the world to the revolutionary principles of disruptive innovation--new rules for doing business in a rapidly changing environment. This business classic shows how even the most outstanding companies can do everything right—yet still lose market leadership. Every thoughtful business person--no matter your level or industry—should read this book to avoid a similar fate. Offering both the successes and failures of leading companies as a guide, The Innovator’s Dilemma reveals how you can simultaneously do what’s right for the near-term health of your established business, while focusing enough resources on the disruptive technologies that ultimately could lead to its downfall. Ignore the innovator’s dilemma at your peril.“How Will You Measure Your Life?” (BONUS HBR article)At Harvard Business School, Clayton Christensen teaches aspiring MBAs how to apply management and innovation theories to build stronger companies. But he also believes that these models can help people lead better lives. In the award-winning Harvard Business Review article, “How Will You Measure Your Life?,” he explains how, exploring questions everyone needs to ask: How can I be happy in my career? How can I be sure that my relationship with my family is an enduring source of happiness? And how can I live my life with integrity?For the first time, get this article together with the bestselling book that established Clayton Christensen as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers.
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Torben Gjetting
Torben Gjettingshared an impression2 years ago
👍Worth reading
💡Learnt A Lot

Although I (as an undergrad student) might not not be the intended reader I enjoyed this book. I do, however, find it to be "unnecessarily technical" in certain descriptions of the technologies it describes.

akbookmate
akbookmateshared an impressionlast year
👍Worth reading
💡Learnt A Lot
🎯Worthwhile

mehrahman81
mehrahman81has quoted3 months ago
An organization’s capabilities reside in two places. The first is in its processes—the methods by which people have learned to transform inputs of labor, energy, materials, information, cash, and technology into outputs of higher value. The second is in the organization’s values, which are the criteria that managers and employees in the organization use when making prioritization decisions. People are quite flexible, in that they can be trained to succeed at quite different things.
Jacob Graff
Jacob Graffhas quoted8 months ago
You have to design them into your family’s culture—and you have to think about this very early on. Like employees, children build self-esteem by doing things that are hard and learning what works.
Kamran Iskenderov
Kamran Iskenderovhas quotedlast year
The last element of the failure framework, the conclusion by established companies that investing aggressively in disruptive technologies is not a rational financial decision for them to make, has three bases. First, disruptive products are simpler and cheaper; they generally promise lower margins, not greater profits. Second, disruptive technologies typically are first commercialized in emerging or insignificant markets. And third, leading firms’ most profitable customers generally don’t want, and indeed initially can’t use, products based on disruptive technologies.
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