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The Martian Chronicles

Mars was a distant shore, and the men spread upon it in waves… Each wave different, and each wave stronger.
The Martian Chronicles
Ray Bradbury is a storyteller without peer, a poet of the possible, and, indisputably, one of America's most beloved authors. In a much celebrated literary career that has spanned six decades, he has produced an astonishing body of work: unforgettable novels, including Fahrenheit 451 and Something Wicked This Way Comes; essays, theatrical works, screenplays and teleplays; The Illustrated Mein, Dandelion Wine, The October Country, and numerous other superb short story collections. But of all the dazzling stars in the vast Bradbury universe, none shines more luminous than these masterful chronicles of Earth's settlement of the fourth world from the sun.
Bradbury's Mars is a place of hope, dreams and metaphor-of crystal pillars and fossil seas-where a fine dust settles on the great, empty cities of a silently destroyed civilization. It is here the invaders have come to despoil and commercialize, to grow and to learn -first a trickle, then a torrent, rushing from a world with no future toward a promise of tomorrow. The Earthman conquers Mars … and then is conquered by it, lulled by dangerous lies of comfort and familiarity, and enchanted by the lingering glamour of an ancient, mysterious native race.
Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles is a classic work of twentieth-century literature whose extraordinary power and imagination remain undimmed by time's passage. In connected, chronological stories, a true grandmaster once again enthralls, delights and challenges us with his vision and his heart-starkly and stunningly exposing in brilliant spacelight our strength, our weakness, our folly, and our poignant humanity on a strange and breathtaking world where humanity does not belong.
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Modern FictionScience Fiction & Fantasy

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Marriage made people old and familiar, while still young.
trees stood stiff
Don’t tell me what I’m doing; I don’t want to know!
I did what most writers do at their beginnings: emulated my elders, imitated my peers, thus turning away from any possibility of discovering truths beneath my skin and behind my eyes.
‘It is good to renew one’s wonder,’said the philosopher. ‘Space travelhas again made children of us all.’
morning, making summer with every breath of its mighty exhausts. The rocket made climates, and summer lay for a brief
‘It is good to renew one’s wonder,’said the philosopher. ‘Space travelhas again made children of us all.’
Marriage made people old and familiar, while still young.
sun was gone. Slowly, slowly the night came
s wonder,’said the philosopher. ‘Space travelhas again made children of
ht. In spite of being
It is good to renew one’s wonder,’said the philosopher. ‘Space travelhas again made children of us all.’
You know what Mars is? It’s like a thing I got for Christmas seventy years ago—don’t know if you ever had one—they called them kaleidoscopes, bits of crystal and cloth and beads and pretty junk. You held it up to the sunlight and looked in through at it, and it took your breath away. All the patterns! Well, that’s Mars. Enjoy it.

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Антон Зуев

Фантастика

Rune Reinholt Keller

Skal læses

Jamie Le Fay

Fantasy

VTorres184

sci fi and fantasy

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