Dark Matter and Trojan Horses: a Strategic Design Vocabulary, Dan Hill
Read

Dark Matter and Trojan Horses: a Strategic Design Vocabulary

Dan Hill is a designer and urbanist. He works for Sitra, the Finnish Innovation Fund, in their Strategic Design Unit in Helsinki, exploring how design might enable positive systemic change throughout society. Prior to Sitra, Dan was an Associate at Arup, Web & Broadcast Director for Monocle, and Head of Interactive Technology & Design for the BBC. He writes the blog cityofsound.com, as well as being Interaction Design Editor for Domus magazine. His essays feature in Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture, and the Future of Urban Space, Mark Shepard (ed.) (Architectural League & MIT Press, 2011), Best of Technology Writing 2009, Steven Berlin Johnson (ed.) (Yale University Press, 2010), and Actions: playing, gardening, recycling and walking, Mirko Zardini (ed.) (Canadian Centre for Architecture, 2008).
more
Impression
Add to shelf
Already read
155 printed pages

ImpressionsAll

💞Loved Up

مساء الخير

QuotesAll

Thus, design must make clear that its remit is expanded from simply problem-solving to context-setting.
In 1964, the Swiss designer Karl Gerstner wrote “To describe the problem is part of the solution.” A few years later, Norman Potter reinforced why this is necessary simply from the point of view of efficacy.
For “articulating alternative ways of being”, read design’s ability to describe how the world is inherently mutable or malleable — how everything is a decision, or the result of a decision — and to suggest and describe alternatives.
Design suggests design, in this sense, as it implies that design has led to this particular state, almost no matter what the scenario, and that therefore another state can exist; we can redesign things, if we see the world in this mutable way.
Jonathan Ive, the senior vice president of industrial design at Apple, in Gary Hustwit’s documentary Objectified, has an almost pained expression on his face when he tries to understand how, in some instances, the world has come to be in material form.

“Why, why, why is it like that, and not like this?” (Jonathan Ive, Objectified, 2009)

Imagine looking at the world through Ive’s hurting eyes. The essential mutability of the world may be a somewhat naive, or — more charitably — optimistic, viewpoint. It could also be seen as solipsistic, in that it privileges the viewpoint of the designer, suggesting that the designer has perhaps the fundamental position in reorienting the world, that all things are design challenges. In other words, a hammer sees only nails.
’s tempting to look at how some other interconnected systems have been designed to deal with failure.
Essentially, strategic design, the focus of this essay, is focused on the systemic redesign of cultures of decision-making at the individual and institutional levels, and particularly as applied to what we can think of as the primary problems of the 21st century — healthcare, education, social services, the broader notion of the welfare state, climate change, sustainability and resilience, steady state economic development, fiscal policy, income equality and poverty, social mobility and equality, immigration and diversity, democratic representation and so on.
Explanations offered veer between feckless nihilism, moral breakdown and consumer culture, through to the belief that an entire generation has been systematically disenfranchised and discarded by 30 years of neoliberal social and economic policy.
The BBC’s economics editor, Paul Mason, in his blog post “Twenty Reasons Why it’s Kicking Off Everywhere”, described a new sociological type — “the graduate with no future” — later going on to describe the “economic permafrost”
between feckless nihilism, moral breakdown and consumer culture,
son attacks in August was essentially unprecedented as their cause was not clear.
While the UK was briefly close to breakdown in the early 1980s, and had witnessed mass protests and unrest many times before, the nature of the rioting,
Health is directly affected by urban planning, transportation and other infrastructure, patterns of employment, food, education, industrial policy, retail policy and so on, most of which will sit outside of the neatly defined boundaries of one department.
That impossible macro-economic scale, just as with the other big-picture indicators such as riots and revolutions, may merely be proxies for deeper fissures emerging in the fabric of society.
everything around us is also the result of a choice, a design decision in effect. So when we see failure, we can only assume a breakdown between policy, the intended design, and delivery, the outcome.
To be clear, any successful strategy is likely to emerge from a multidisciplinary perspective, in which design and designers play a part, no more.
MacEwan’s essay discusses the idle resource depletion and energy inefficiency involved in construction, the need for social mobility and income equality, the need for the profession to better understand the sources of human happiness, the exploitation of land value
So the Low2No building is Trojan Horse, a carrier of multiple strategic outcomes well outside of a traditional building. With the emphasis on replicability7, each outcome is in effect a different platoon pouring out of the Trojan Horse, and marching across Finland.
the Nordic Model is based on the “successful reconciliation of the apparently oppositional Enlightenment traditions of equality and liberty. National Romanticism had a relatively limited impact on the Nordic countries,
curious melange of a functioning shanty town
WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? BACKDROP When I started writing this essay, Athens was burning again. Muammar Gaddafi had been killed the day before. Occupy Wall Street was in its sixth week of protest in downtown Manhattan, its participants growing in number every day such that it has effectively become a curious melange of a functioning shanty town with celebrity endorsement and global media presence, in what is a private space, Zuccotti Park. The Occupy movement had spread worldwide, from small, almost timid protests in my hometown of Helsinki, to violent running battles with police on the streets of Rome. More than 950 cities took part in a coordinated global protest on 15 October 2011 across 82 countries, five months after the first Occupy protest in Spain. Some 500,000 people took part in the 15 October protest in Madrid alone (in Spain, almost half of all youth are unemployed). Unified by the #occupy hashtag and the slogan “We are the 99%”, the movement continues to grow. A few months earlier, from 6 to 10 August 2011, many towns and cities in the UK — mainly in London, Birmingham and Manchester — suffered violent riots of a scale and ferocity that had not been seen for a generation, if ever. While the UK was briefly close to breakdown in the early 1980s, and had witnessed mass protests and unrest many times before, the nature of the rioting, looting and arson attacks in August was essentially unprecedented as their cause was not clear. Whereas the earlier poll tax riots and miners’ strikes, for example, had a clear ideological disagreement at their heart, these riots seemed to be about something else. But what, exactly? After the recriminations and finger pointing, we are no closer to an answer. Explanations offered veer between feckless nihilism, moral breakdown and consumer culture, through to the belief that an entire generation has been systematically disenfranchised and discarded by 30 years of neoliberal social and economic policy. Either way, the cause was so deeply embedded, so fundamental, as to appear beyond the core capacity of government itself. This last year has also seen the Arab Spring unfolding across north Africa, with Tunisia and Egypt undergoing revolutions, Libya in civil war, civil uprisings in Bahrain, Syria and Yemen, and numerous other countries and states witnessing major protests — Algeria, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco and Oman among them. In July 2011, the USA was hours away from “shutting down government”, due to its own inability to agree on appropriate
The BBC’s economics editor

On the bookshelvesAll

architecture and urbanism, mrn ptrv

mrn ptrv

architecture and urbanism

Strelka, bazzivel

bazzivel

Strelka

Related booksAll

Related booksAll

The Dot-Com City: Silicon Valley Urbanism, Alexandra Lange

Alexandra Lange

The Dot-Com City: Silicon Valley Urbanism

Across the Plaza: the Public Voids of the Post-Soviet City, Owen Hatherley

Owen Hatherley

Across the Plaza: the Public Voids of the Post-Soviet City

Splendidly Fantastic: Architecture and Power Games in China, Julia Lovell

Julia Lovell

Splendidly Fantastic: Architecture and Power Games in China

Edge City: Driving the Periphery of Sao-Paulo, Justin McGuirk

Justin McGuirk

Edge City: Driving the Periphery of Sao-Paulo

Belyayevo Forever: Preserving the Generic, Kuba Snopek

Kuba Snopek

Belyayevo Forever: Preserving the Generic

The Action is the Form: Victor Hugo’s TED Talk, Keller Easterling

Keller Easterling

The Action is the Form: Victor Hugo’s TED Talk

Make it Real: Architecture as Enactment, Sam Jacob

Sam Jacob

Make it Real: Architecture as Enactment

Don’t give a book.
Give a library.
fb2epubzip
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)