The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Francis Scott Fitzgerald
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Francis Scott Fitzgerald

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

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This story was inspired by a remark of Mark Twain's to the effect that it was a pity that the best part of life came at the beginning and the worst part at the end. By trying the experiment upon only one man in a perfectly normal world I have scarcely given his idea a fair trial. Several weeks after completing it, I discovered an almost identical plot in Samuel Butler's “Note-books.”
The story was published in "Collier's" last summer and provoked this startling letter from an anonymous admirer in Cincinnati:
«Sir —
I have read the story Benjamin Button in Colliers and I wish to say that as a short story writer you would make a good lunatic I have seen many peices of cheese in my life but of all the peices of cheese I have ever seen you are the biggest peice. I hate to waste a peice of stationary on you but I will.»
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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Francis Scott Fitzgerald
  • 👍Worth reading18
  • 🚀Unputdownable5
  • 💧Soppy4
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kbhogilal
kbhogilalshared an impression3 years ago
👍Worth reading
💀Spooky
🎯Worthwhile

Cool...
Abruptly ended though

b4527504685
b4527504685shared an impressionlast year
🎯Worthwhile

Отличная книга

Sevinj Huseynova
Sevinj Huseynovashared an impression2 years ago
👍Worth reading

A short story of Benjamin Button - the style of writing is flawless and the story itself impressively original. However I’d still favor the movie as it contends more of details rather the book.

Benjamin felt himself on the verge of a proposal—with an effort he choked back the impulse. "You're just the romantic age," she continued—"fifty. Twenty-five is too wordly-wise; thirty is apt to be pale from overwork; forty is the age of long stories that take a whole cigar to tell; sixty is—oh, sixty is too near seventy; but fifty is the mellow age. I love fifty."
and when he was being undressed for bed that night he would say it over and over aloud to her: "Elyphant, elyphant, elyphant." Sometimes Nana let him jump on the bed, which was fun, because if you sat down exactly right it would bounce you up on your feet again, and if you said "Ah" for a long time while you jumped you got a very pleasing broken vocal effect.
Thereafter Benjamin contrived to break something every day, but he did these things only because they were expected of him, and because he was by nature obliging.
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