Moby Dick, Herman Melville
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Moby Dick

When a wandering sailor looking to be hired onto a whaling ship finds himself on the Pequod, little does he know the dire fate that awaits him and his crewmates. For the ship’s captain, Ahab, is slowly going insane. Having lost a leg in an ill-fated harpoon attack against a fearsome white whale many years before, Ahab vows his revenge against Moby Dick — a vow that has become Ahab’s deadly obsession.
After many months at sea, Moby Dick is spotted, and Ahab engages the crew in relentless pursuit. Ahab will stop at nothing to kill the beast…even if it means his own death — and the death of all his crew.
Can Ahab be stopped before it is too late? Or will the Pequod — and all its crew — perish in the silent depths of the sea…?
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Moby Dick, Herman Melville
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Considering how sociably we had been sleeping together the night previous, and especially considering the affectionate arm I had found thrown over me upon waking in the morning, I thought this indifference of his very strange. But savages are strange beings; at times you do not know exactly how to take them.
Yes, as every one knows, meditation and water are wedded for ever.
Yes, as every one knows, meditation and water are wedded for ever.
But that same image, we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans. It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.
And still deeper the meaning of that story of Narcissus, who because he could not grasp the tormenting, mild image he saw in the fountain, plunged into it and was drowned. But that same image, we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans. It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.
trembled
Nevertheless the sun hides not Virginia's Dismal Swamp, nor Rome's accursed Campagna, nor wide Sahara, nor all the millions of miles of deserts and of griefs beneath the moon. The sun hides not the ocean, which is the dark side of this earth, and which is two thirds of this earth. So, therefore, that mortal man who hath more of joy than sorrow in him, that mortal man cannot be true—not true, or undeveloped. With books the same. The truest of all men was the Man of Sorrows, and the truest of all books is Solomon's, and Ecclesiastes is the fine hammered steel of woe. "All is vanity." ALL.
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Consider the subtleness of the sea; how its most dreaded creatures glide under water, unapparent for the most part, and treacherously hidden beneath the loveliest tints of azure. Consider also the devilish brilliance and beauty of many of its most remorseless tribes, as the dainty embellished shape of many species of sharks. Consider, once more, the universal cannibalism of the sea; all whose creatures prey upon each other, carrying on eternal war since the world began.
Consider all this; and then turn to this green, gentle, and most docile earth; consider them both, the sea and the land; and do you not find a strange analogy to something in yourself? For as this appalling ocean surrounds the verdant land, so in the soul of man there lies one insular Tahiti, full of peace and joy, but encompassed by all the horrors of the half known life. God keep thee! Push not off from that isle, thou canst never return!
What of it, if some old hunks of a sea-captain orders me to get a broom and sweep down the decks? What does that indignity amount to, weighed, I mean, in the scales of the New Testament? Do you think the archangel Gabriel thinks anything the less of me, because I promptly and respectfully obey that old hunks in that particular instance? Who ain't a slave? Tell me that.
He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the known nations of the world.
He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the known nations of the world.
For to go as a passenger you must needs have a purse, and a purse is but a rag unless you have something in it.
And there is all the difference in the world between paying and being paid. The act of paying is perhaps the most uncomfortable infliction that the two orchard thieves entailed upon us. But BEING PAID,—what will compare with it?
Yes, as every one knows, meditation and water are wedded for ever.
He loved to dust his old grammars; it somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality.
Ignorance is the parent of fear

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