Edwin Abbott

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

With wry humor and penetrating satire, Flatland takes us on a mind-expanding journey into a different world to give us a new vision of our own. A. Square, the slightly befuddled narrator, is born into a place which is limited to two dimensions—irrevocably flat—and peopled by a hierarchy of geometrical forms. In a Gulliver-like tour of his bizarre homeland, A. Square spins a fascinating tale of domestic drama and political turmoil, from sex among consenting triangles to the intentional subjugation of Flatland’s females. He tells of visits to Lineland, the world of one dimension, and Pointland, the world of no dimension. But when A. Square dares to speak openly of a third, even a fourth dimension, his tragic fate climaxes a brilliant parody of Victorian society.

An underground favorite since its publication in England in 1884, Flatland is as prophetic a science-fiction classic as the works of H.G. Wells, introducing aspects of relativity and hyperspace years before Einstein’s famous theories, and it does so with a wonderful, enduring enchantment.
123 printed pages

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Impressions

    Кирилл Моисеевshared an impression4 years ago
    🔮Hidden Depths

    Instigates you to step over your dimensional believes in an effort to grasp or to the least of it touch what could be an instance of a space of more than 3 dimensions.

    What could it be like to be capable of perceiving a space of negative dimensions?

Quotes

    Kirsten Gunvor Løthhas quoted5 hours ago
    now, I will rise; and the effect upon your eye will be that my Circle will become smaller and smaller till it dwindles to a point and finally vanishes.
    There was no "rising" that I could see; but he diminished and finally vanished. I winked once or twice to make sure that I was not dreaming. But it was no dream. For from the depths of nowhere came forth a hollow voice—close to my heart it seemed—"Am I quite gone? Are you convinced now? Well, now I will gradually return to Flatland and you shall see my section become larger and larger."
    Kirsten Gunvor Løthhas quoted5 hours ago
    call me a Circle; but in reality I am not a Circle, but an infinite number of Circles, of size varying from a Point to a
    Kirsten Gunvor Løthhas quoted5 hours ago
    Lordship would treat me as if I were one of the vulgar who, being ignorant of Mathematics, suppose that a Woman is really a Straight Line, and only of One Dimension. No, no, my Lord; we Squares are better advised, and are as well aware of your Lordship that a Woman, though popularly called a Straight Line, is, really and scientifically, a very thin Parallelogram, possessing Two Dimensions, like the rest of us, viz., length and breadth (or thickness).

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