Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
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Treasure Island

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of «buccaneers and buried gold». First published as a book on May 23, 1883, it was originally serialized in the children’s magazine Young Folks between 1881–82 under the title Treasure Island or, the mutiny of the Hispaniola with Stevenson adopting the pseudonym Captain George North.
Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is an adventure tale known for its atmosphere, characters and action, and also as a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality — as seen in Long John Silver — unusual for children’s literature now and then. It is one of the most frequently dramatized of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perceptions of pirates is enormous, including treasure maps marked with an «X», schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen carrying parrots on their shoulders.
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Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
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🎯Worthwhile

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🎯Worthwhile
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💩Utter Crap

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alexandra26reedshared an impression10 months ago
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🙈Lost On Me
🔮Hidden Depths
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I am interest about this book

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such an interesting adventure!

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and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as lonely, had chosen
I had thought up to that moment of the adventures before me, not at all of the home that I was leaving; and now, at sight of this clumsy stranger, who was to stay here in my place beside my mother, I had my first attack of tears.
pleasant sittyated grog-shop
I hated the very thought of Treasure Island.
— 3. The Black Spot

ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks and medicines. He was lying very much as we had left him, only a little higher, and he seemed both weak and excited.
«Jim,» he said, «you're the only one here that's worth anything, and you know I've been always good to you. Never a month but I've given you a silver fourpenny for yourself. And now you see, mate, I'm pretty low, and deserted by all; and Jim, you'll bring me one noggin of rum, now, won't you, matey?»
«The doctor — « I began.
But he broke in cursing the doctor, in a feeble voice but heartily. «Doctors is all swabs,» he said; «and that doctor there, why, what do he know about seafaring men? I been in places hot as pitch, and mates dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the sea with earthquakes — what do the doctor know of lands like that? — and I lived on rum, I tell you. It's been meat and drink, and man and wife, to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab»; and he ran on again for a while with curses.
«Look, Jim, how my fingers fidges,» he continued in the pleading tone. «I can't keep 'em still, not I. I haven't had a drop this blessed day. That doctor's a fool, I tell you. If I don't have a drain o' rum, Jim, I'll have the horrors; I seen some on 'em already. I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain. Your doctor hisself said one glass wouldn't hurt me. I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim.»
He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father, who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer of a bribe.
«I want none of your money,» said I, «but what you owe my father. I'll get you one glass, and no more.»
When I brought it to him, he seized it greedily and drank it out.
«Aye, aye,» said he, «that's some better, sure enough. And now, matey, did that doctor say how long I was to lie here in this old berth?»
«A week at least,» said I.
as lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence. And
If schooners, islands, and maroons,
and the rest of these
And indeed bad as his clothes were and coarsely as he spoke, he had none of the appearance of a man who sailed before the mast, but seemed like a mate or skipper accustomed to be obeyed or to strike. The man who came with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as lonely, had chosen it from the
The Old Buccaneer
, an American gentleman in accordance with whose classic taste the following narrative has been designed, it is now, in return for numerous delightful hours, and with the kindest wishes, dedicated by his affectionate
PART SIX
Captain Silver

— 28. In the Enemy's Camp

THE red glare of the torch, lighting up the interior of the block house, showed me the worst of my apprehensions realized. The pirates were in possession of the house and stores: there was the cask of cognac, there were the pork and bread, as before, and what tenfold increased my horror, not a sign of any prisoner. I could only judge that all had perished, and my heart smote me sorely that I had not been there to perish with them.
There were six of the buccaneers, all told; not another man was left alive. Five of them were on their feet, flushed and swollen, suddenly called out of the first sleep of drunkenness. The sixth had only risen upon his elbow; he was deadly pale, and the blood-stained bandage round his head told that he had recently been wounded, and still more recently dressed. I remembered the man who had been shot and had run back among the woods in the great attack, and doubted not that this was he. The parrot sat, preening her plumage, on Long John's shoulder. He himself, I thought, looked somewhat paler and more stern than I was used to. He still wore the fine broadcloth suit in which he had fulfilled his mission, but it was bitterly the worse for wear, daubed with clay and torn with the sharp briers of the wood.
«So,» said he, «here's Jim Hawkins, shiver my timbers! Dropped in, like, eh? Well, come, I take that friendly.» And thereupon he sat down across the brandy cask and began to fill a pipe.
«Give me a loan of the link, Dick,» said he; and then, when he had a good light, «That'll do, lad,» he added; «stick the glim in the wood heap; and you, gentlemen, bring yourselves to! You needn't stand up for Mr. Hawkins; HE'LL excuse you, you may lay to that. And so, Jim» — stopping the tobacco — «here you were, and quite a pleasant surprise for poor old John. I see you were smart when first I set my eyes on you, but this here gets away from me clean, it do.»
To all this, as may be well supposed, I made no answer. They had set me with my back against the wall, and I stood there, looking Silver in the face, pluckily enough, I hope, to all outward appearance, but with black despair in my heart.
Silver took a whiff or two of his pipe with great composure and then ran on again.
«Now, you see, Jim, so be as you ARE here,» says he, «I'll give you a piece of my mind. I've always liked you, I have, for a lad of spirit, and the picter of my own self when I was young and handsome. I always wanted you to jine and take your share, and die a gentleman, and now, my cock, you've got to. Cap'n Smollett's a fine seaman, as I'll own up to any day, but stiff on discipline. 'Dooty is dooty,' says he, and right he is. Just you keep clear of the cap'n. The doctor himself is gone dead again you — 'ungrateful scamp' was what he said; and the short and the long of the whole story is about here: you can't go back to your own lot, for they won't have you; and without you start a third ship's company all by yourself, which might be lonely, you'll have to jine with Cap'n Silver.»
So far so good. My friends, then, were still alive, and though I partly believed the truth of Silver's statement, that the cabin party were incensed at me for my desertion, I was more relieved than distressed by what I heard.
«I don't say nothing as to your being in our hands,» continued Silver, «though there you are, and you may lay to it. I'm all for argyment; I never seen good come out o' threatening. If you like the service, well, you'll jine; and if you don't, Jim, why, you're free to answer no — free and welcome, shipmate; and if fairer can be said by mortal seaman, shiver my sides!»
«Am I to answer, then?» I asked with a very tremulous voice. Through all this sneering talk, I was made to feel the threat of death that overhung me, and my cheeks burned and my heart beat painfully in my breast.
«Lad,» said Silver, «no one's a-pressing of you. Take your bearings. None of us won't hurry you, mate; time goes so pleasant in your company, you see.»
«Well,» says I, growing a bit bolder, «if I'm to choose, I declare I have a right to know what's what, and why you're here, and where my friends are.»
«Wot's wot?» repeated one of the buccaneers in a deep growl. «Ah, he'd be a lucky one as knowed that!»
«You'll perhaps batten down your hatches till you're spoke to, my friend,» cried Silver truculently to this speaker. And then, in his first gracious tones, he replied to me, «Yesterday morning, Mr. Hawkins,» said he, «in the dog-watch, down came Doctor Livesey with a flag of truce. Says he, 'Cap'n Silver, you're sold out. Ship's gone.' Well, maybe we'd been taking a glass, and a song to help it round. I won't say no. Leastways, none of us had looked out. We looked out, and by thunder, the old ship was gone! I never seen a pack o' fools look fishier; and you may lay to that, if I tells you that looked the fishiest. 'Well,' says the doctor, 'let's bargain.' We bargained, him and I, and here we are: stores, brandy, block house, the firewood you was thoughtful enough to cut, and in a manner of speaking, the whole blessed boat, from cross-trees to kelson. As for them, they've tramped; I don't know where's they are.»
He drew again quietly at his pipe.
«And lest you should take it into that head of yours,» he went on, «that you was included in the treaty, here's the last word that was said: 'How many are you,' says I, 'to leave?' 'Four,' says he; 'four, and one of us wounded. As for that boy, I don't know where he is, confound him,' says he, 'nor I don't much care. We're about sick of him.' These was his words.
«Is that all?» I asked.
«Well, it's all that you're to hear, my son,» returned Silver.
«And now I am to choose?»
«And now you are to choose, and you may lay to that,» said Silver.
«Well,» said I, «I am not such a fool but I know pretty well what I have to look for. Let the worst come to the worst, it's little I care. I've seen too many die since I fell in with you. But there's a thing or two I have to tell you,» I said, and by this time I was quite excited; «and the first is this: here you are, in a bad way — ship lost, treasure lost, men lost, your whole business gone to wreck; and if you want to know who did it
— it was I! I was in the apple barrel the night we sighted land, and I heard you, John, and you, Dick Johnson, and Hands, who is now at the bottom of the sea, and told every word you said before the hour was out. And as for the schooner, it was I who cut her cable, and it was I that killed the men you had aboard of her, and it was I who brought her where you'll never see her more, not one of you. The laugh's on my side; I've had the top of this business from the first; I no more fear you than I fear a fly. Kill me, if you please, or spare me. But one thing I'll say, and no more; if you spare me, bygones are bygones, and when you fellows are in court for piracy, I'll save you all I can. It is for you to choose. Kill another and do yourselves no good, or spare me and keep a witness to save you from the gallows.»
I stopped, for, I tell you, I was out of breath, and to my wonder, not a man of them moved, but all sat staring at me like as many sheep. And while they were still staring, I broke out again, «And now, Mr. Silver,» I said, «I believe you're the best man here, and if things go to the worst, I'll take it kind of you to let the doctor know the way I took it.»
«I'll bear it in mind,» said Silver with an accent so curious that I could not, for the life of me, decide whether he were laughing at my request or had been favourably affected by my courage.
«I'll put one to that,» cried the old mahogany-faced seaman — Morgan by name — whom I had seen in Long John's public-house upon the quays of Bristol. «It was him that knowed Black Dog.»
«Well, and see here,» added the sea-cook. «I'll put another again to that, by thunder! For it was this same boy that faked the chart from Billy Bones. First and last, we've split upon Jim Hawkins!»
«Then here goes!» said Morgan with an oath. And he sprang up, drawing his knife as if he had been twenty.
«Avast, there!» cried Silver. «Who are you, Tom Morgan? Maybe you thought you was cap'n here, perhaps. By the powers, but I'll teach you better! Cross me, and you'll go where many a good man's gone before you, first and last, these thirty year back — some to the yard-arm, shiver my timbers, and some by the board, and all to feed the fishes. There's never a man looked me between the eyes and seen a good day a'terwards, Tom Morgan, you may lay to that.»
Morgan paused, but a hoarse murmur rose from the others.
«Tom's right,» said one.
«I stood hazing long enough from one,» added another. «I'll be hanged if I'll be hazed by you, John Silver.»
«Did any of you gentlemen want to have it out with ME?» roared Silver, bending far forward from his position on the keg, with his pipe still glowing in his right hand. «Put a name on what you're at; you ain't dumb, I reckon. Him that wants shall get it. Have I lived this many years, and a son of a rum puncheon cock his hat athwart my hawse at the latter end of it? You know the way; you're all gentlemen o' fortune, by your account. Well, I'm ready. Take a cutlass, him that dares, and I'll see the colour of his inside, crutch and all, before that pipe's empty.»
Not a man stirred; not a man answered.
«That's your sort, is it?» he added, returning his pipe to his mouth. «Well, you're a gay lot to look at, anyway. Not much worth to fight, you ain't. P'r'aps you can understand King George's English. I'm cap'n here by 'lection. I'm cap'n here because I'm the best man by a long sea-mile. You won't fight, as gentlemen o' fortune should; then, by thunder, you'll obey, and you may lay to it! I like that boy, now; I never seen a better boy than that. He's more a man than any pair of rats of you in this here house, and what I say is this: let me see him that'll lay a hand on him — that's what I say, and you may lay to it.»
«But what is the black spot, captain?» I asked.
soiled blue coat,
We held a council in the cabin.
«Sir,» said the captain, «if I risk another order, the whole ship'll come about our ears by the run. You see, sir, here it is. I get a rough answer, do I not? Well, if I speak back, pikes will be going in two shakes; if I don't, Silver will see there's something under that, and the game's up. Now, we've only one man to rely on.»
«And who is that?» asked the squire.
«Silver, sir,» returned the captain; «he's as anxious as you and I to smother things up. This is a tiff; he'd soon talk 'em out of it if he had the chance, and what I propose to do is to give him the chance. Let's allow the men an afternoon ashore. If they all go, why we'll fight the ship. If they none of them go, well then, we hold the cabin, and God defend the right. If some go, you mark my words, sir, Silver'll bring 'em aboard again as mild as lambs.»
man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before
The Black Spot

ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks and medicines. He was lying very much as we had left him, only a little higher, and he seemed both weak and excited.

«Jim,» he said, «you're the only one here that's worth anything, and you know I've been always good to you. Never a month but I've given you a silver fourpenny for yourself. And now you see, mate, I'm pretty low, and deserted by all; and Jim, you'll bring me one noggin of rum, now, won't you, matey?»

«The doctor — « I began.

But he broke in cursing the doctor, in a feeble voice but heartily. «Doctors is all swabs,» he said; «and that doctor there, why, what do he know about seafaring men? I been in places hot as pitch, and mates dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the sea with earthquakes — what do the doctor know of lands like that? — and I lived on rum, I tell you. It's been meat and drink, and man and wife, to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab»; and he ran on again for a while with curses.

«Look, Jim, how my fingers fidges,» he continued in the pleading tone. «I can't keep 'em still, not I. I haven't had a drop this blessed day. That doctor's a fool, I tell you. If I don't have a drain o' rum, Jim, I'll have the horrors; I seen some on 'em already. I seen old Flint in the corner there, behind you; as plain as print, I seen him; and if I get the horrors, I'm a man that has lived rough, and I'll raise Cain. Your doctor hisself said one glass wouldn't hurt me. I'll give you a golden guinea for a noggin, Jim.»

He was growing more and more excited, and this alarmed me for my father, who was very low that day and needed quiet; besides, I was reassured by the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer of a bribe.

«I want none of your money,» said I, «but what you owe my father. I'll get you one glass, and no more.»

When I brought it to him, he seized it greedily and drank it out.

«Aye, aye,» said he, «that's some better, sure enough. And now, matey, did that doctor say how long I was to lie here in this old berth?»
close to me, holding me in one iron fist and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry. «Lead me straight up to him, and when I'm in view, cry out, 'Here's a friend for you,
described as lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence. And that was al
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