Savvy Painter Podcast

Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
127Books
Savvy Painter is a weekly podcast for artists who mean business. Antrese Wood talks to experts in the field about the business of art and how it gets created. Want to know how leaders in the fine art world of plein-air and landscape painting got their start? What habits do top artists have in common? Every week, we talk about representational painting, abstract art, alla prima painting, art competitions, art materials, watercolor, oil painting, how to get into an art gallery, how to succeed with your art business and so much more!
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast12 days ago
Do you ever find yourself fascinated by the stories of artists who paint from sketch drawings? What do those artists look for when they sketch? How do they remember the right colors or where the light was coming from? Hoping to get some answers to these questions and a whole lot more, I was pleased to sit down with the artist, Tom Hughes. In our conversation, Tom opens up about how he found his path as an artist, what it was like working for the Christian Science Monitor, and more. I can’t wait for you all to get a peek into the world of Tom Hughes!  Hearing the call Can you remember that moment when you decided you wanted to pursue your career as an artist? Or maybe for you, the draw to an art career was more of a gradual revelation. Slow or sudden, each artist has their own version of realizing their unique path as an artist. For Tom Hughes, the decision to embrace life as an artist was more along the lines of answering a “Calling.” If you are religious, spiritual, something in between, or nothing at all, I’m sure you can relate to what Tom talks about when he describes his draw to art as a “Calling.” For some reason, I’ve found that language to resonate with many artists, does it resonate with you?  Picking up skills along the way  As you’ve grown as an artist over the years, do you attribute it to practice or learning new skills along the way? While some artists love to explore new methods and push the limits, others like to hunker down and become proficient at one particular approach. Tom Hughes did not receive formal art training at a university for college; he took the route that included self-education. As you can imagine, Tom’s journey hasn’t always been easy. He has had significant moments of confidence, like his time at the Christian Science Monitor, and he’s had periods where he had to take a break and step away.  Finding the right process Through all of the highs and lows of Tom’s career, the one constant that gets to the heart of Tom’s career is his willingness to adapt and discover the right process. Rarely do artists get described as process-oriented. We artists often get painted with a broad stroke and labelled as flighty, inconsistent, and emotional, just to name a few! Tom worked hard for years to hone in on the process that would work best for him. One of the ways Tom likes to work is by sketching his subjects before he goes to the canvas. Are you drawn to a more process-focused approach in your art?  It’s OK to change over time I am still blown away when I look back to the start of this fledgeling little podcast and the few friends I knew who would listen to see the massive following we enjoy today - it’s incredible! There are a few elements from those early episodes that you’ll still notice as part of the podcast today, but there have been many changes. If you don’t learn and adapt over time, what is the point? Too often, I find my fellow artists are more adverse to change and evolution then I had expected. We are the ones who get the opportunity to push the envelope and help the public look deeper - it’s OK to change over time! Outline of This Episode [0:50] I introduce my guest, Tom Hughes.  [2:20] How Tom got started as an artist.  [9:00] Skills that Tom picked up and learned along the way.  [14:00] Tom’s studio process.  [19:00] Diving into the details of Tom’s sketching sessions.  [26:40] Tom’s process when it comes to plein air painting.  [34:15] What is Tom’s color pallet like?  [40:00] How we change as artists over time.  [46:20] Tom’s struggle with watercolours.  [50:20] Why I love watercolours and life as an artist.  [1:00:00] Have tolerance for your bad paintings!  Other artists mentioned on this episode Winslow Homer Rembrandt Resources Mentioned on this episode Tom’s website Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Painting from Sketch Drawings, with Tom Hughes, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcastlast month
When was the last time you really took a moment to slow down and notice your surroundings? Do you find that you are easily distracted by your cell phone notifications or the million other things demanding your attention? You aren’t alone! I’ve struggled with managing my distractions for years, so I was thrilled to hear my guest, Michelle Dunaway address this critical topic. In our conversation, we also discuss Michelle’s oil painting, her recent arm injury, how to be honest with yourself, and much more. I know that artists like you will get a ton of value from Michelle’s thoughtful perspective, enjoy!  Space to daydream and wonder What was your childhood like? Did you have a ton of expectations placed on you from an early age or were you free to find your own path? While many parents have nothing but the best of intentions - the truth is - a carefree childhood can quickly get pushed to the wayside. Thankfully, Michelle was given permission and encouragement to explore her creativity. Looking back, she is especially fond of the moments where she would get lost in a daydream or playing in a field. Michelle also points to a critical influence in her life, Richard Schmidt - he also took time to invest in Michelle and encourage her abilities both professionally and as a peer. An unexpected injury  Don’t you hate it when life throws you a huge curveball that you never saw coming? Maybe for you, it was an unexpected expense like a car repair or the illness of a loved one, or maybe your story is a lot like Michelle’s and you’ve experienced a personal injury that you have to overcome. After recovering from a misstep that caused an injury to her arm, Michelle started to get back into the swing of things. Before long, she realized that she wasn’t able to put in the hours painting as she had before the accident. It turns out that Michelle had re-injured her arm and now has to undergo surgery and an extensive recovery process.  Managing distractions  The experience with her arm injury highlighted an important aspect that Michelle had been working to focus on for years - managing distractions. From her cellphone to the news and everything in between - Michelle’s life felt like it was full of distractions. As a spiritual person, Michelle looks to prayer and meditation to help her find her center. Cutting through all the noise of daily life is no easy task! The injury to her arm has forced Michelle to become more aware and present - she still struggles with the distraction of her cell phone, but she’s making progress. What can you take away from Michelle’s story?  The moments that make you smile  Have you had a moment in your art career that made you pause in gratitude? Let’s face it; gratitude is not an easy attitude to cultivate. We can get so focused and caught up in what we don’t have or what isn’t going right that we fail to reflect on the good things in life. Michelle will be the first person to tell you that her life is filled with things to be grateful for. Looking back on her career - Michelle points out one person’s reaction to her oil painting of Richard Schmidt as a particularly remarkable experience. The man that was viewing her painting was moved to tears and explained that Michelle’s painting made him feel like he had met Richard Schmidt. What a compliment! Outline of This Episode [1:00] I introduce my guest, Michelle Dunaway.  [2:30] Michelle talks about her influences and why she started a career in art.  [5:30] How has Michelle’s arm injury impacted her journey?  [19:20] Michelle and I discuss the “Artist’s eye.”  [21:00] Learning to be honest with yourself.  [29:30] What does Michelle look for in a subject?  [39:00] Michelle talks about her experience working with Faso.  [42:00] A typical day in Michelle’s studio. [50:00] Removing distractions.  [54:40] Proud moments from Michelle’s career.  [1:04:00] Michelle shares a story about a painting that moved her.  [1:13:30] What is Michelle’s dream project?  Other artists mentioned on this episode Richard Schmidt John Singer Sargent  Monet Cecilia Beaux Jeremy Lipking Mary Oliver Stephanie Paige Thomson  Resources Mentioned on this episode Michelle's website Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcastlast month
Have you found artists who paint Americana inspiring? Are you drawn to the romanticism and grandeur of the genre? How do artists who focus on painting Americana feel about their genre of work? I was thrilled to sit down with the talented and generous artist, Susan Lyon. In our conversation, Susan opened up about what led her to her career as an artist, why she decides to change things up, her dream of mentoring young artists, and much more. I can't wait for you to get to know Susan's inspiring story!  A captured imagination  When you look back at your start as an artist, who do you point to for inspiration? Was your imagination captured by the likes of Georgia O'Keeffe and N. C. Wyeth? Susan Lyon's imagination was ignited by a whole range of artists, including O'Keeffe and Wyeth. Today, Susan finds herself encouraged and inspired by her peers who paint Americana. Susan also enjoys studying and painting the faces of people she loves. Listening to Susan, you really get the sense that her heart is poured out into her artwork.  Practicing meditation  How do you deal with all the stress and challenges of life as an artist? What practices help you focus and unlock your creativity? For years Susan Lyon would practice meditation, but it wasn't until the last couple of years when everything started to "Click." By practicing meditation, Susan has learned how to calm her nervous system and ask open-ended questions. Meditation has given Susan the gift of perspective and peace - key elements for a healthy career as an artist! What can you learn from Susan's story? What practices have helped you in your career?  Don't chase perfection!  Have you been caught up in the perfection game? Some artists learn quickly how detrimental the pursuit of perfection can be - for others, it can take years. We've all been there - you have a particular idea of how you want your artwork to turn out but reality jumps in and messes everything up. It's at that point where you need to decide if you are going to keep pouring in your time and energy or cut your losses and start something new. Susan recalls how challenging it can be to realize that you've sunk way too much time into a project that needs to end. I hope you find her advice and insights as helpful as I did!  The power of group energy When was the last time you got so caught up in the electric energy and positive influence of your fellow artists? Some artists love to get alone with their canvas and explore the depths of their creativity while others feed off of and thrive in a more communal environment. Beyond personal preferences - Susan makes an excellent point about the power of group energy, especially when it comes to artists. In her experience, when like-minded artists gather and encourage one another - powerful energy is unlocked. Have you experienced that time group energy? Outline of This Episode [0:53] I introduce my guest, Susan Lyon.  [3:05] What led Susan to her career as an artist.  [12:00] Susan talks about changing things up.  [17:15] Reverting back to a safety zone.  [19:50] Susan shares the benefit of practicing meditation.  [29:30] Why Susan enjoys painting the image of people she loves. [35:00] The challenge of chasing perfection.  [40:10] What is Susan’s process like in the studio?  [45:30] Susan’s dream of mentoring younger artists.  [50:10] The power of group energy.  [53:30] Branching out with a one-person show and teaching.  [1:06:00] The power of vulnerability.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Richard Schmid  Georgia O'Keeffe Bettina Steinke Howard Terpning N. C. Wyeth J. C. Leyendecker Resources Mentioned on this episode www.savvypainter.com/faso Susan’s website Brene Brown Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast2 months ago
What does it take to branch out from traditional practices and sell your art on platforms like Etsy? Can you make a living off of an Etsy business? What should you look out for? Good news! I put all these questions and more to my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop.  In our conversation, Jenni opens up about realistic expectations, why it’s not enough to just build a shop on Etsy, how to plan for seasonal changes, and much more. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to build a presence on a platform like Etsy - this is the episode for you!  Addressing Criticism The last time I had Jenni on as a guest, we had an excellent discussion that resonated with a lot of Savvy Painter listeners. Just recently, I received a message that had some pointed criticism for Jenni and the numbers she shared regarding her Etsy earnings. In our conversation, Jenni breaks down why she shared the numbers that she shared and why she had to split up her shops to increase her earning potential. After our conversation, I’m confident that you’ll have a greater understanding of what to expect when it comes to building a presence on Etsy.  Don’t be afraid to test What is the best product to sell on Etsy? For each artist and seller, the answer to this question will change - especially depending on the season! While small prints will sell well for one artist - large prints will sell better for another. The key is to give yourself permission to test the market and find out what works. When it comes to selling your art - there is no one size fits all solution you’ve got to be willing to make adjustments and learn as you go. Jenni encourages artists to look around at what is selling, especially given the season.  If you build it - will they come?  Remember that old Kevin Costner movie, “Field of Dreams?” Wouldn’t it be nice if your business were as simple as setting it up and waiting for the customers to flock to your doorstep? Unfortunately - as many of you know - selling your art isn’t easy. Just like nurturing relationships with a gallery - you’ve got to nurture a relationship with your audience on platforms like Etsy. Consider sharing part of your story or starting a blog to feature artwork and projects you’ve worked on in the past.  One step at a time How do you feel about starting your Etsy store? Does it sound daunting and overwhelming? If so - you aren’t alone. There are so many artists out there who want to begin selling on Etsy and other platforms, but they don’t know where to start. I get it - I’ve been there! Don’t think that you need to have everything up and running right away - you don’t! Listen to Jenni’s advice and start one step at a time - break it down into manageable steps that you can accomplish at your own pace. For more information on how to start an Etsy shop - make sure to check out Jenni’s website! Outline of This Episode [1:10] I introduce my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop.  [5:00] Jenni addresses some criticism from our first episode together.  [12:30] Setting realistic expectations. Jenni shares some helpful examples.  [19:50] Testing what works and learning from what doesn’t.  [27:00] Should you be worried about people ripping off your artwork on Etsy?  [35:30] What is going on with Etsy’s shipping promotions?  [38:30] If you build it - they will come - right?  [42:30] Jenni explains how to break down your priorities.  [45:00] How do you deal with audience burnout?  [50:20] Preparing for seasonal trends.  [53:30] Building a presence and making a connection.  [56:45] Tips for building up your business and planning out your month.  Resources Mentioned on this episode Discover How to Sell Your Art Online and Grow Your Audience, with Jenni Waldrop Fuzzy & Birch Does Etsy Actually Work? Snapshot of a Real Etsy Business Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast2 months ago
I still can’t believe that it’s been five years since I started the Savvy Painter podcast. Back when I first started, there were hardly any podcasts about, by, or for artists. Today, there are a ton of options out there, and I’m happy to call many of them friends! On this episode - I decided to do something different - I sat down with a handful of fellow podcasters to answer three questions.
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast3 months ago
When was the last time that you found deep and abiding joy in your artwork? Have you explored the joy of painting animals and pets? Most of you know how excited I am about Trekell’s new Pet Portrait Competition. Guess what? I’ve got the judge for that competition joining me for this episode of the podcast!
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast3 months ago
If you are anything like me - you’ve struggled with how to deal with your inner critic over the years. There are a few things that have helped me deal with my inner critic, but I am always excited to hear what my peers have done to address this common issue in the art community. Here to share his unique and valuable perspective is the artist - Danny Gregory.
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast4 months ago
What does it look like to see your career take off as an artist on Instagram? Is it a sustainable model or has Facebook’s acquisition taken all fun and profitability out the platform? I put all of these questions and a lot more to my guest, Kate Zambrano.  Kate is a fine artist based in California specializing in realistic portrait art and figurative art, made up mostly of females. Sometimes described as dark art, her work is a personal study of human psychology and complexity. Kate creates melancholic body languages and expressions, capturing the nuanced truth.  I can’t wait for you to learn from Kate’s unique perspective - I know you’ll find what she has to say is knowledgeable and entertaining! Putting in the hours  Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy, and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal, and you can tell! Falling in love with charcoal Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal and you can tell! Navigating Instagram  Instagram - do you love it or hate it as an artist? Have been able to grow your audience and deepen your connection to your followers? Kate enjoyed a huge boon to her business and her career as an artist once she began posting on Instagram. Quickly, Kate became quite the force as a popular artist on Instagram - then the bottom fell out. A year and a half ago, everything changed with Instagram’s algorithm - small businesses that were thriving on the platform started shutting down left and right. Since they reworked the platform, artists like Kate have noticed that their content hasn’t been getting nearly as many likes or engagement as years past. Instagram’s change has had a huge negative impact on Kate and her business. She thought the decline in support was attributed to her skill and ability as an artist. Today, Kate is doing a lot better - she found a new way forward and shifted her view of success.  Kate’s view of success What does success look like for Kate today? With all the instant validation of Instagram no longer factoring into her view of success - Kate has had to rethink her personal definition of success. Kate is now focused on maintaining a positive attitude and a healthy mindset - she believes that forward thinking and staying in-tune with her emotions will put her back on the right track. Professionally, Kate finds encouragement in the positive feedback she gets from her peers - she’s not chasing approval, but she’s grateful to get it from her friends. Outline of This Episode [0:45] I introduce my guest, Kate Zambrano.  [2:45] How Kate decided to pursue a career as an artist.  [6:00] Practice and repetition.  [12:30] How Kate taught herself to draw.  [15:10] Kate describes her artwork.  [20:45] Why charcoal is Kate’s favorite medium.  [26:25] How to enter Trekell’s pet portrait competition.  [35:10] Kate explains how she got started on Instagram and what has changed.  [44:30] The challenge of making it as a female artist.  [50:10] Kate’s view of personal and professional success.  [53:30] What Kate is obsessed with.  [1:01:20] How to connect with Kate.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Sean Cheetham - Savvy Painter Resources Mentioned on this episode Realistic Portrait Art | Charcoal Workshops | Kate Zambrano Art Kate Zambrano (@katezambrano) • Instagram Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast4 months ago
Imagine living on a boat in the San Francisco Bay area - doesn’t that sound AMAZING? How would you optimize your working area? What materials would you use? Instead of guessing the answers to this beautiful scenario - I got to ask my friend Kaethe Bealer all about it! Kaethe is a long time listener of Savvy Painter and she’s participated in several of my workshops over the years. I have been so impressed with Kaethe’s growth as an artist. From life on a boat to her process using acrylic paint I know Kaethe’s unique insights and reflections will help artists like you in a number of ways. Life on a boat Seriously though - what is it like living on a boat near San Francisco? Don’t you want to know? Apparently, it is not always as romantic as it sounds. As you can imagine space is at a premium. Forget leaving a studio space set up - if space isn’t being used - then things have to be put away. Thankfully, Kaethe has a supportive spouse who encourages her and supports her in her growth as an artist. While life on a boat sounds challenging - Kaethe also has some stellar work to show for it - which she has to store off boat at her father-in-law's house. Why acrylic paint? Speaking of Kaethe’s artwork - I was interested to hear what type of paint she uses on her boat and why. Kaethe uses acrylic paint and works mostly on pannel - her subject matter is all over the place - she loves to explore whatever catches her interest. With her life on the boat - Kathe has found acrylic paint to be the best material to use - it’s easy to clean up! She has a little evaporation bucket outside that she uses to discard her dirty water. Kaethe also uses Open Golden which is an extended drying acrylic paint. Just keep painting “Just keep painting” is one of the mantras that has impacted Kaethe’s on her journey as an artist. She experienced a significant period in her life where she stopped painting and it took her while to get back into the rhythm. These days Kaethe is committed to putting in the time and logging those hours at the canvas. She wants to encourage her artisitc peers to keep at it and stay in the game. Selling her work on the internet was a huge turning point for Kaethe - that experience also buoyed her spirits and emboldened her to get her work featured in art galleries. Workshop junkie Have you heard the term, “Workshop junkie?” I would consider myself a workshop junkie - I LOVE workshops. If money wasn’t a factor I’d fill up my days in workshops with fellow artists honing my skills and learning new techniques and insights. In our conversation - Kaethe and I also discussed the danger of using workshops as a crutch. Attending too many workshops can lead to thinking too little of your abilities and hamstringing your growth. Finding the balance is not an easy task but it is crucial - you need to have a healthy mindset! Outline of This Episode [0:45] I introduce my guest, Kaethe Bealer. [3:15] What led Kaethe to her current work with acrylic paint? [5:15] Living on a boat, is it as romantic as it sounds? How does Kaethe manage it? [8:45] Kaethe describes her process and how she works with various acrylic colors. [15:30] How did Kaethe lose the “Chalky” feel of her paintings? [20:30] Kaethe and I talk about the influence of Peggi Kroll Robers. [23:30] Make sure to check out the Trekell Art Supplies competition. [25:30] Just keep painting. [30:00] Kaethe describes her evolution as an artist. [37:30] Advice Kaethe has for fellow artists. [40:30] How does Kaethe decide which art competitions to enter? [45:00] Kaethe and I discuss the value of workshops. [47:00] What led Kaethe to jump back into her artwork? [49:00] Closing thoughts from Kaethe. Other artists mentioned on this episode Timothy Horn - Savvy Painter Stanley Goldstein - Savvy Painter Peggi Kroll Roberts - Savvy Painter Sarah Sedwick Resources Mentioned on this episode Kaethe's website Instagram: @kaethe_bealer Facebook page: Kaethe Bealer - Home | Facebook Trekell Art Supplies Galleries: Valley Art Gallery Galleries: Studio Gallery Galleries: Bedford Gallery Open - Golden Artist Colors, Inc. Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast5 months ago
I’ve got a special episode in store for you all this week including questions and answers to a few select topics. I wanted to experiment with a new format, and I’m glad to have you along for the ride! On this episode - I cover how artists like you can navigate art competitions, I give an update about my move to Argentina, and I go over some productivity tips. I’m so thankful to all of you who have been so supportive and encouraging as I’ve made the transition back to Argentina - I excited to roll out some exciting new interviews and innovative episodes like this one! How to find the right art competitions I know it might feel that way, but here is the truth - not all art competitions are shady. It is also unfair to lump them all into the same category, some art competitions will be a great fit for one artist, and they’ll be a terrible fit for others. Here are my four tips for finding the right art competitions. Understand your goal. Do your homework. Celebrate when you get in! Just move on when you don’t get in. You are responsible for your own career - so act like it! Don’t get upset about the cost of entering into an art competition, if you think it’s a right fit and that you have a shot then go for it. As you can tell, I’ve got a lot to say about this topic, and I know it’s not an easy one. I’d love to hear from you - what tips do you have to share about finding the right art competitions? Argentina update We did it! We’ve made it to our new home in Villa Carlos Paz in Argentina. It’s been great to hear from many of you as you’ve patiently waited to hear from me during this whole transition process. My new studio is all set up, and I am ready to jump back into my routine. One thing that is a bit of a love/hate factor of life here in Villa Carlos Paz is all the mom and pop stores. I love that I get to directly support the local economy with my purchases - I hate that it can take weeks and weeks to get something as simple as binder clips. All-in-all life is good, and I’m glad for this new chapter of life! Be kind to yourself! As an artist, you want to create worthwhile art, and that’s great! Let’s be honest - when you fail to create the stellar art you have envisioned in your mind - you let yourself have it. We are notorious at holding ourselves to such high and lofty standards that when we fail, we are our own worst critics. Self-reflection is great! Beating yourself up is not so great. Think of it this way - you wouldn’t let your friend beat themselves up - so don’t do it to the person in the mirror! I firmly believe that you cannot create from a place of frustration or negativity - if that sounds too fluffy - too bad :) Outline of This Episode [0:15] I introduce this special question and answer episode. [2:20] My tips for navigating juried art competitions. [8:00] What is a reasonable price to expect for entering an art competition? [10:00] I give an update on my move to Argentina. [12:20] How do you keep moving forward when life keeps getting in the way? [17:00] Tips for good results when plein air painting. [19:30] Closing thoughts. Resources Mentioned on this episode www.savvypainter.com/webinar My Instagram Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast5 months ago
When was the last time you decided to quite all the voices and just focus on your desire to create art? Is it hard for you to carve out the time in your life or have you found the right formula to make it work? Wherever you are at in your journey, I know you’ll appreciate hearing from the amazing Jacksonville based artist - Kristin Cronic. In our conversation, Kristin opens up about how she got started as an artist, what it was like navigating life as a Navy officer, how she recovered when her whole world was flipped upside down, and so much more. Don’t forget to check out images of Kristin’s artwork located at the end of this post. Paint on the floor and permission to create art Do you remember when you were first given permission to paint? Remember the joy you had? What happened to that joy? Have you fanned those flames over the years or are you just now starting to re-light the fire? Kristin Cronic looks back to the early years of her life when her mother would allow her to paint and explore to heart's content. Her mother still has a paint-covered floor in her room at that house to this day! Kristin also received early encouragement from her aunt, Kathy Strauss who is also an artist. Surviving a hurricane Several years ago in 2017, Hurricane Irma struck the Florida coast, the Florida Keys, and the Caribbean. Irma also happened to strike just as Kristin and her family were planning a major shift in their lives - Kristin was resigning from the Navy to pursue her career in art. Also - Kristin was six weeks pregnant with their second child. As crazy as that time was, thankfully, Kristin and her family made it through the whole ordeal safely. In the ensuing months, Kristin and her family went to work picking up the pieces as they began to rebuild. Two months after the chaos - Kristin started to really struggle with all the challenges that were building up. Thankfully, her husband stepped in with some helpful advice. Follow your gut In the middle of trying to bring order to chaos, Kristin followed her husband’s advice, and she started painting again. He knew, even when she had forgotten that taking the time to create art would help her find peace. It’s wonderful when you have people in your corner who help you follow your gut even when you can’t hear it speaking up! As Kristin started to follow her gut and get back into what brought her joy, she found herself struggling with a direction. Listening to the Savvy Painter podcast helped Kristin reconnect with her inner artist and begin the path toward creating art again. Listening to the podcast wasn’t the silver bullet for Kristin, she also reached out to a local artist, and she enrolled in the Savvy Painter Growth Studio. It’s never too late Hopefully, you’ll find Kristin’s powerful story of finding her way and following her gut inspiring - I know I did! What I want artists like you to know is this; it’s never too late. You aren’t too old or too out of touch with the art community. No excuse is big enough to keep you from creating art. The world needs your story and your art just as much as it needs Kristin’s! I’m so encouraged that this podcast and the community we’ve built has helped artists like Kristin find their way. Please, continue offering your feedback and your insights as we continue to work together to create something meaningful in this space. Outline of This Episode [0:08] An update on my move to Argentina. [2:00] I introduce my guest, Kristin Cronic. [3:20] How did Kristin get started as an artist? [7:30] Kristin talks about how this podcast and a local artist encouraged her to get back involved with painting. [13:00] How Kristin’s world turned upside down. [17:30] The differences between the Navy culture and life as an artist. [21:15] Kristin explains how she started to find her voice. [26:45] How Kristin got her art featured in two art shows. [34:00] Insights Kristin has learned by listening to artists featured on this podcast. [37:30] Advice that Kristin has for fellow artists. [39:45] Closing thoughts. Other artists mentioned on this episode Cameron Schmitz Paul Ladnier Erin Spencer Kathy Strauss Resources Mentioned on this episode Kristin Cronic Fine Art Savvy Painter Growth Studio Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast6 months ago
Do you have questions about oil painting and the best materials to use? Look no further, it’s here! Robert Gamblin, Mary Weisenburger, and Pete Cole join me to answer your biggest questions about oil painting and more! I’m so excited for you to hear their helpful insights into some really great topics. You’ll hear them go over questions about pigments, stories about pigment sources, why some paints have more oil separation, some great information on oil paints and toxicity, and much more! This will serve as a great resource for artists like you to keep in your back pocket. Learn how you can connect with Gamblin and utilize their great resources! A Dedicated Focus on Oil Painting You’ve heard that old phrase, “Jack of all trades and master of none” right? That’s what comes to mind when I hear Robert Gablin talk about why his company solely focuses on oil painting instead of branching out to provide water colors, acrylic paints, and other materials. Instead of being a jack of all trades, Robert and his team have decided to focus on being a master of one, oil paint products. Their narrow focus has paid off, they have displayed an amazing passion for detail and improvement on their niche subject. Just hearing from Robert, Mary, and Pete I could tell that they really know their field – they are the experts when it comes to oil paint! Is the New Blue Worth it? If you follow news about pigments and breaking developments around that subject like I do, then you’ve heard of the new “YInMn Blue” that was discovered at Oregon State University. This new color was discovered in 2009 as a byproduct of an experimentation. Since this news has recently been making the rounds on social media again it led me to get Robert Gamblin’s take on the new color and if they’ve found it worth it to start producing the color themselves. Robert explained that they found that it is not effective to produce the color for a few reasons. Their primary reason is the enormous cost it requires to create the color. This is due to the fact that the color requires three compounds and two of them are rare earth minerals. Robert’s vast knowledge was on display during our conversation and I know that artists like you will find his insights very helpful. Mitigating Toxicity Risks Do you find yourself concerned about your health when it comes to your time in the studio? Are you nervous about how your lifestyle as an artist will impact your health in long run? What would it mean for you to have supplies that are responsible, not only for the environment but for artists like you? My guests from Gamblin are happy to share with artists like you that their line of high-quality products are free of toxins. They want to see more artists use products that are sustainable and health conscious. Don’t let your time in the studio get clouded by concern for your health. Hear from the Gamblin team and how their products could be the best fit for you! What is FastMatte? Don’t you hate it when you are in a creative flow and you have to make the decision to pause and let your paint dry before you can proceed? What if there was a way to avoid that pause and continue with your creative momentum? That’s where Gamblin’s helpful product, FastMatte come in. FastMatte colors are a unique type of oil colors, every color dries fast, every color dries matte. These qualities make them perfect for underpainting techniques. FastMatte also serves as an excellent way to come back to oil painting for those painters who have switched to acrylics because of the need for a faster drying rate. I was seriously impressed with this helpful solution that Gamblin has developed and I hope you get the chance to find out for yourself!
Your Questions Answered! With Gamblin Artist's Colors,
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast7 months ago
What is that people look for when they invest time and money into collecting art? Are they looking for a particular style? Is it for their personal enjoyment or do they want it to serve as a conversation starter? Here to give us a great peek inside the world of collecting art is art advisor, Tracy Kinnally. In our conversation, Tracy explains how she got started as an art advisor, where the art market is headed, advice for artists and collectors, and much more. I know that artists like you will really appreciate our conversation especially the turn it takes toward the end. How do you get started as an art advisor? Have you ever wondered how someone gets started as an art advisor? Did they dream of helping people find art from an early age? Tracy Kinnally studied at Christie’s in London and then went on to intern at the Chelsea gallery in New York and the Guggenheim in Venice. These days, Tracy is hard at work on her business helping people all over the world find the right art to feature in their home or workplace. You can connect with Tracy by going to her website; the link is located in the resources section. What are art collectors looking for? As many people can attest to, collecting art can become a sort of obsession. What is it that these collectors are looking for? Do they get connected to a particular artist or a style? Tracy has found that each person is looking for something a little bit different and that is why she enjoys meeting people in their homes to get a sense of what would fit for that individual. She even finds that what a collector says they want and what they really want are two different things. I found Tracy’s perspective fascinating and helpful, and I know that you will too! Advice for artists and collectors. If you are going to start collecting art, you should connect with someone like Tracy Kinnally, seriously. Art advisors can help you make the right decision and even expose you to options would have never otherwise considered. If you don’t want to connect with an art advisor, Tracy says that you should follow your gut. When you see something you like, go with it, don’t buy a painting that you are unsure about. As for artists, Tracy says that they should make their work as easily accessible as possible. She encourages artists to build up a body of work and to have contact channels easy to find and responsive. The worst thing you can do is to ignore or never follow up with a collector who is interested in your artwork! Where the art market is headed. Without a doubt, the art market is headed into an exciting period. Even right now, there are so many possibilities open to artists and those collecting art. Gone are the days where you could only sell your art in a gallery or at an art show, the internet has made it so much easier than it was in the past. Yes, there are challenges that come with this new direction for the art market, but there is no going back, you have to adapt. What is your take on this topic? Do you agree with Tracy’s take, let me know! Outline of This Episode [5:20] I introduce my guest, Tracy Kinnally. [6:45] How did Tracy get into her work as an art advisor. [9:30] Tracy talks about her work with private art collectors. [17:00] How does Tracy create her catalogue of paintings and artists? [20:40] Tracy talks about curating a space and picking the right piece of art to feature. [32:00] Advice for collectors and artists. [35:20] Where is the art market headed? [38:00] Tracy and I talk about some of the artists that we are obsessed about right now. [45:00] Where did portrait paintings come from? Why do we collect them? [47:00] Painting the female image. [54:30] Closing thoughts. Other artists mentioned on this episode Toyin Ojih Odutola Genieve Figgis Jean Honore Frangonard Francois Boucher Cameron Rowland Venus of Willendorf Cave paintings of Lascaux Venus de Mlo Venus of Urbino Birth of Venus Matthew Brannon Katja Seib Caroline Walker Nick Farhi Kathryn Andrews Amber Lia Kloppel Ann Gale Catherine Kehoe Ken Kewley Resources Mentioned on this episode Tracy's website Tracy on Twitter Tracy on Instagram Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast7 months ago
Last week I sent out an email to my subscribers asking them, “What does success mean to you?” I received over two hundred responses from Savvy Painter followers! People have a lot to say about this topic and as you can imagine each answer was different and had a unique perspective. I want to take this opportunity to highlight some of those responses and engage in a larger conversation about life as an artist trying to attain “Success.” I want you to join the discussion about success, and I want to hear what other topics you’d like me to showcase. You need to determine your definition of success. Let’s face it; the answer to this question is not an easy one. As many of you noted, a quick definition might pop into your mind, but upon further consideration, you struggle to come up with a definition that fits. Ultimately, I believe that each person has to answer this question for themselves, but they do need to answer it. Don’t trick yourself into believing that you can leave this question unanswered and still somehow become “Successful.” How can you achieve something that you haven’t taken the time to define? An action step, if you dare, come up with a working definition of success that fits you. Once you’ve got that definition, write it down! Can we talk about the financial side of success? I know it’s a “Dirty” word, but we are going to talk about money. So many of you, and rightfully so, are concerned about the financial side of the success conversation. I know that you didn’t get into your career as an artist for the money, nobody would choose this profession with that goal. Unfortunately, our society often propagates the idea that our income level is tied to our worth or value. There is no way around it, the financial aspect is part of the success conversation, but I’m so glad that many of you know that it’s not the only factor defining of success. Here is the truth, you need money to live and deserve to get paid for your hard work! Show up and put in the work. Whatever your definition of success is, the fact is, you won’t succeed if you don’t stay in the game. It’s not easy to stay in the habit of working on your artwork; this is why I ask so many of my guests to give us a peek behind the curtain and let us in on their process when it comes to time in the studio. Every day that you choose to paint, you are choosing in your favour. Are you putting in the time? Do you have a process that works for you and keeps you on track? If so, let me know! My definition of success. Thank you to everyone who joined the conversation by responding to my question, I read all the replies, and I was so encouraged to hear all your perspectives! I’d like to leave you with my definition of success. Success is continued growth; it means continually expanding my horizons. For me, success means staying true to my values and staying curious. This whole art journey for me is about the process. The process of painting is more important to me than the outcome. I don’t mind failing; I don’t see failure as the opposite of success. I can learn from failure; I can’t learn if I quit on myself or my art. I hope you find this conversation on the definition of success helpful. The final message that I want to leave you with is; you are so much more than the Hollywood version of success! Outline of This Episode [1:35] I introduce the topic for this episode; “What does success mean to you?” [6:45] Why you need to define success for yourself. [16:00] Considering the financial aspect of success. [21:20] You need money to live, there is no shame in getting paid for your art. [28:30] Showing up and putting in the work. [31:15] Success is multifaceted. [35:20] I share my definition of success. [39:00] You are so much more than the Hollywood version of success! Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
What does success mean to you?, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast8 months ago
Have you ever wanted to grab your materials and head for the mountains for a plein air painting session? While that specific scenario may not resonate with every artist, I know the desire to change things up and get out of a creative slump will. My guest, Therese Morgan along with her friend and fellow artist, Mark David took off for the adventure of a lifetime backpacking the John Muir Trail. In our conversation, we discuss what led Therese to embark on this crazy expedition, challenges she faced along the way, how the trip impacted her artwork, what she learned from her journey, and much more. Caution, this episode may cause you to pack your bags and head for the hills (in a good way!) Hitting a wall. If you’ve been an artist for very long, chance are you’ve hit a wall, creatively. If you haven’t yet, consider yourself extremely lucky! What should you do when you hit a wall, find yourself in a slump, experience a creative block, or whatever you want to call it? Many artists have a unique take on how to get past a creative block. Some will say, to keep your head down and stick to your schedule while others will encourage you to take a break and pick up a book. Then there are crazy people like Therese Morgan who pack up their studio and go for a hike, and not just any hike, a twenty-seven-day hike along the John Muir Trail in California! Plein air painting, where? Have you experimented with plein air painting? Where have you explored and enjoyed the outdoors with your artwork? Have you ever done something as crazy as a twenty-seven-day hike with your shelter, clothing, food, water, and painting supplies strapped to your back? To some, plein air painting while on a multi-week hike might sound crazy, and to others (like me) it sounds like fun! Therese Morgan and her friend Mark David came to this idea one night over dinner. Their idea seemed great on paper, but they both wondered, could they pull it off? You might be under the assumption that Therese and Mark are avid and experienced backpackers; they were not. You also might assume that they had just received a generous grant or they had some other means of financial security; they did not. Lacking experience and the requisite finances, Therese and Mark forged ahead, convinced that their dream would be worth all foreseen and unforeseen challenges they’d face along the way. After some careful planning, the pair decided to embark on an almost month-long journey on the John Muir Trail. The John Muir Trail is a long-distance trail in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, passing through Yosemite, Kings Canyon, and Sequoia National Parks. The trail's length is 211 miles long with an elevation gain of approximately 47,000 feet. For almost all of its length, the trail is in the High Sierra backcountry and wilderness areas, not exactly a “relaxing” experience. Lessons learned and brush miles logged. As you can imagine, Therese and Mark’s journey was challenging, to say the least. Hiker after hiker in the backcountry would pass them by, surprised that they’d take on such an adventure with their art supplies. Looking back, Therese is proud of the amazing feat that she accomplished by finishing her journey but also of the artwork she had created along the way. Combining their efforts, Therese and Mark have created the “Brushmiles” project. Brushmiles was a term their mutual teacher, Craig Nelson would say to them, in reference to putting in the effort to paint often, to put in the miles as a painter. You can get a glimpse of their journey by checking out the link to their page located in the resources section below. Outline of This Episode [0:55] I introduce my guest, Therese Morgan. [2:40] How did Therese get involved with painting? [5:30] Therese talks about her post-college creative slump. [11:50] The challenge of finding the right artistic community. [17:00] What led Therese and her friend to hike the John Muir Trail? [29:20] Therese talks about hitting the John Muir Trail. [36:00] What did Therese learn from her trip? [41:00] Things that went wrong on Therese’s trip. [43:15] How many paintings did Therese complete on the trail? What was her schedule? [46:30] Therese talks about the benefits and challenges of hiking with her peer. [48:30] How has the John Muir Trail experience influenced Therese’s artwork? Resources Mentioned on this episode Therese's website Brush Miles A Walk in the Woods Marie Kondo Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast8 months ago
How do you create a body of work that displays your abilities and passions as an artist? What thought process is required to curate and develop your own body of work? Artist Constance Mallinson was kind enough to join me to discuss this important topic. Constance is a California based artist. Her most recent exhibitions include Pomona College, UC Riverside, The Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, and Angles Gallery in Los Angeles. She was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship as well as a City of Los Angeles Artist’s grant. She has also taught every aspect of art at all the major universities and colleges in Southern California including UCLA and Claremont Graduate School. Throughout our conversation, Constance shared her early artistic influences, what led her to consider a career as an artist, how her art has evolved over the years, why we need to pay attention to moments of transition, and much more. I can’t wait for you to learn from Constance’s fascinating and thoughtful perspective. Creating a body of work Every artist at some point agonizes over the thought of creating a body of work that captures both what they are good at and what they love to create. Do you have a curated and developed body of work? What has helped you develop your body of work over the years? For Constance Mallinson, it all comes down to letting her skillset and her intuition guide her. As she looks back on her career, Constance remembers her early work with minimalistic landscape paintings and how she transitioned from that to her work with the pattern and decoration movement. What can you learn from Constance’s journey? Embracing each step along the way. When do you get to the point where you’ve “Arrived” as an artist? Does it ever really happen or is it just a made up ideal of fame and fortune? Instead of looking at a pinnacle moment of fame or glory, Constance decides to look at her life and art career as building blocks or steps taken on a journey. Each step is valuable because they build upon each other. You can’t take away the step of minimalistic landscape work because it contributes to her work with the pattern and decoration movement. You also can’t take away motherhood without taking away the new perspectives that aspect of Constance’s life brought to her work. Constance is passionate about helping artists not only enjoy the moments of prestige, but she also wants to help us value in-between moments as well. Do what you want to do! When was the last time you gave yourself permission to do what you want to do as an artist? Seriously! Too often we can get caught up with the idea of what we “Ought to be doing” or what people expect us to do that we fail to consider what we want our body of work to look like. If money wasn’t a factor, what would you be working on right now? I loved putting this question and the whole idea of following your desire to Constance Mallinson. She was quick to light up when we talked about shirking the expectations of others to focus on what we feel like we need to do. I hope you get as much enjoyment out this conversation with Constance as I did!  Outline of This Episode [1:50] I introduce my guest, Constance Mallinson. [3:45] What led Constance to a career as an artist? [6:15] Early artistic influences. [8:30] How has Constance’s art evolved over the years? [20:30] Art-making is the interfacing the personal and the cultural. [23:50] How far women have come in the art community. [29:00] The way that parenthood shapes life as an artist. [32:15] What is Constance working on right now? [44:30] Valuing the in-between moments and times of transition. [52:00] Why don’t we do what we want to do? [56:00] Constance’s dream project. Other artists mentioned on this episode Holly Solomon Giuseppe Arcimboldo Miriam Schapiro John James Audubon Gene Davis Claude Monet Miriam Schapiro Mike Kelley Resources Mentioned on this episode Constance's website Book - Landscape and Memory Book - Turner Whistler Monet Book - The Sight of Death Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast8 months ago
Can you really capture emotion in art? Is there something that you can convey on the canvas that transfers to the viewer? Emotion is such a complicated and complex human experience that the effort to capture it on canvas seems like an impossible task. My guest, Linda Christensen is proving that notion wrong with her amazing artwork. Linda is a Northern California based artist who paints a moment in time in women’s lives, she looks for the emotional connection and tries to capture it. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree and her Graduate Certificate from the University of California, Santa Cruz. In our conversation, Linda opens up about how she got started as an artist, habits and rituals that keep her in a creative flow, how a David Park painting influenced her, why she is ok with “getting it wrong,” tips for connecting with a gallery and pricing artwork, and much more. I know that artist like you will get a lot out of our wonderful conversation. Expressing emotion in art. Have you ever had that moment in your career where you finally found someone who expressed themselves creatively as you do? Who was that artist for you? What was it in their work that resonated with you? For Linda Christensen, that moment came when she was viewing a painting by the figurative artist, David Park. When she saw one of his paintings, Linda had an immediate and emotional connection that she’d never experienced before. That encounter with the David Park painting told Linda that emotion could be captured in a painting. Embracing distraction. What is your process like in the studio? Do you have a checklist you go through so you can get into your creative flow? Some artists love to work with music playing or after they’ve spent time in an art book, but everyone has to find their groove. I’ve found it helpful over the years to hear from my peers like Linda Christensen who are more than willing to share what they’ve found useful as they approach the canvas. Linda likes to knock out all of her errands and personal tasks before she steps foot into her studio. She also loves to have an old black and white movie playing in the background that she’s seen before so she can have a contrast to her painting process. I loved hearing all about Linda’s studio process and her love for Catherine Hepburn movies; I hope you enjoy it too. Getting it wrong. Do you ever find yourself jumping through hoops and trying to please someone else or working fulfill some idea of what you “ought” to be doing with your artwork? Do you give in to those voices and let them shape your art or do you try to silence them? Artist Linda Christensen has embraced the idea of “getting it wrong” because she knows that she’ll never “get it right.” Someone will always have a critique ready but Linda is ok with that, and she encourages other artists to embrace this mindset as well. At the end of the day, none of us are, as Linda says, “movie-ready” we all have flaws, why not embrace them? Outline of This Episode [2:30] I introduce my guest, Linda Christensen. [4:00] What led Linda to a career as an artist? [5:30] Linda talks about how David Park influenced her artwork. [7:45] How Linda describes her artwork and how her process plays out. [11:20] Habits and patterns that help Linda in her studio. [15:30] Silencing the inner critic. [17:15] How do you decide if you’ve finished a painting? [19:40] Linda talks about how she navigated her early career. [22:00] Advice Linda has for artists trying to get their artwork featured in galleries. [26:00] How does Linda price her artwork? [31:45] Linda talks about how her process changes each time she goes to the canvas. [37:00] What does it mean to “get it wrong?” [43:00] What does Linda hope people walk away with after viewing her paintings? Other artists mentioned on this episode David Park Resources Mentioned on this episode Linda's website Linda on Instagram Linda on Facebook Galleries: www.Suegreenwoodfineart.com www.Winfieldgallery.com www.Gailseverngallery.com www.stremmelgallery.com Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast9 months ago
Do your dreams impact your creative process? Have you ever explored this aspect of intersection between your imagination and your art? Does your approach to starting a painting differ from your peers? My guest, Suzanne Unrein took the time to explore these fascinating topic and much more throughout our conversation. Suzanne is a California native and current New Yorker. Her paintings and works on paper explore a vibrant world of humans and animals. Her work is characterized by vibrant colours and expressive gestures. In our conversation, we discuss intuition and how dreams influence her paintings from time to time. We also touch on some differences in how we start painting. I can’t wait for you to learn from the fascinating insights and unique perspective that Suzanne brings to the table. Is there a “right way” to start painting? Where you ever taught that there was a “right way” and a “wrong way” to start painting? Did that direction cause you to have a dogmatic approach? Suzanne Unrein explained to me that she doesn’t have a set pattern that she goes back to when she approaches the canvas. She wants to put herself in a position to hear from the canvas in a new way each time she goes to start painting. As she explained her process, Suzanne did confess that she occasionally slips into some technical patterns but that emphasis to listen to the canvas is always in the back of her mind. What approach has worked for you as you’ve developed as an artist? Exploring the influence of dreams. Dreams are such a fascinating topic, from poetry and song to film and artwork, as a species we’ve long tried to understand and come to grips with what our minds process while we sleep. Have your dreams seeped into your creative process or vice versa? Suzanne shared with me that she once dreamt that she was getting eaten by a lion. She shared this with me in the larger context of her exploration of animals and the influence they have on our imagination and our society. Animals also play a huge role in Suzanne’s artwork. Have you played with the concept of dreams or animals in your artwork? Getting unstuck. What does it take to get past a creative block? Do you have any tips or tricks that have worked for you throughout your career? I’ve been stuck plenty times creatively, and I am always eager to hear from my peers to get their perspective on getting unstuck. Suzanne says that she gets stuck from time to time due to her perfectionist nature, she’ll focus on one aspect for too long that she can’t see anything else. When that happens, she’ll just pull back and remove the section that has her stuck, and she’ll start fresh the next day. I hate getting stuck but hearing from artists like Suzanne can be helpful in developing different remedies to this common occurrence. Outline of This Episode [2:30] I introduce my guest, Suzanne Unrein. [4:15] What led Suzanne to her career in art? [7:30] Suzanne talks about getting her start in LA. [10:30] How does Suzanne describe her artwork? [17:30] Is there a good “way” to start painting? [23:00] Suzanne talks about her process and a project she is working on. [30:40] Is there anything that scares Suzanne about painting? [35:15] Questions that Suzanne is interacting with in her artwork. [40:00] How does Suzanne deal with creative block? [43:30] Art that Suzanne would love to have from a living artist. [49:00] Where you can find Suzanne’s artwork.   Other artists mentioned on this episode Franz Kline Jackson Pollock Ed Ruscha John Baldessari Henri Matisse Pablo Picasso Gerhard Richter Marlene Dumas Julie Mehretu Ann Gail Resources Mentioned on this episode Suzanne's website Can Serrat in El Bruc, Barcelona, Spain Books: Madeline Miller — Circe Degenerate Art — The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany Annie Duke — Thinking in Bets Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast9 months ago
What comes to mind when you consider the phrase, “Truth in art?” Do you think of artists who have a bold message in their artwork or do you think of more subtle approaches? It was my pleasure to speak with the artist, Vincent Giarrano. Vincent received his BFA from the State University of New York at Buffalo and his MFA from Syracuse University. In our conversation, we touched on the vital role of truth in art and how that concept has shaped him as an artist. We also discussed what it means to leave a legacy, how writing can fuel the creative process, what it looks like to create a business plan, and much more. I know that artists like you will enjoy hearing from Vincent’s wonderful perspective. How writing can fuel the creative process. Does writing play a role in your creative process? If not, have you ever considered taking up the practice of writing? I’ve seen writing impact my artwork over the years, so I love taking the opportunity to explore this important practice with my peers. Vincent Giarrano also enjoys the practice of writing; he says that writing helped him as he transitioned from his work in illustration to fine art. He also credits his writing for helping him work out ideas for various projects, staying focused and organized, and with his research. If writing doesn’t help you in the ways that it has helped Vincent, what is it that fuels your creative process? Leaving a legacy. When you think about your legacy as an artist, what is it that you want to be known for? Do you want to be known for your excellent technique? Your innovative style? Your bold message? Or do you want to be known for something completely different? After surveying the landscape of the art world, Vincent Giarrano yearned to create art that communicated truth and sincerity. Vincent isn’t after complexity for complexity’s sake; he wants to produce a body of work that is true to his convictions. Make sure to check out images of Vincent’s artwork located at the end of this post. Building a business plan.  Let’s face it as a community; artists aren’t known for their business acumen. How have you fared when it comes to the business side of your art career? Have you found certain practices and strategies that have helped you succeed? For artist Vincent Giarrano, it all came down to taking the time to develop a business plan. In this particular area, Vincent says that he approached building his business plan logically. Step by step, he thought through how he’d promote his artwork, how he’d sell it, who his ideal customers were, and what level of craftsmanship he’d need to commit to. While this process wasn’t easy for Vincent, looking back, he is glad that he took the time to put together a cohesive plan. The challenge of pricing your artwork. It is the dreaded decision that every artist has to face, what price to place on your art. Do you still struggle with this aspect of your career? Some artists figure out this aspect of their business easily while some struggle for an extended period. According to Vincent Giarrano, the best practice is to take a look at the marketplace and see what other artists, comparable to your skill and experience are charging. There is no need to leave this aspect of your business up to guesswork; you can come up with a good idea on what to charge based on what your peers are doing. Vincent has a ton of helpful insights to share with artists who are just getting started, and I know that seasoned artists will also benefit from his unique perspective. Outline of This Episode [1:00] I introduce my guest, Vincent Giarrano. [2:45] Vincent opens up about how he got started as an artist. [7:00] How did Vincent get involved with illustration? [10:45] Vincent talks about how working with comic books shaped him as an artist. [13:30] How writing helps Vincent’s creative process. [20:00] Why it’s helpful to get into the right frame of mind. [28:00] What impact does Vincent want to have with his art? [31:45] How Vincent chooses his subject matter. Where does he find his models? [38:30] Discussing the use of photography. [45:00] Vincent talks about constructing his business plan. [48:20] What is the best way to price your artwork? [54:20] Vincent talks about what he is currently working on. [58:00] Why did Vincent decide to paint a subject looking at the viewer? [1:00:30] How does Vincent choose which painting he enters into a contest? Other artists mentioned on this episode Jack Kirby Jim Steranko Neal Adams Frank Miller John Singer Sargent Resources Mentioned on this episode Vincent’s website Vincent on Instagram Vincent on Facebook Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast10 months ago
Happy Holidays! Last week we celebrated over 2 million downloads of the Savvy Painter podcast! None of this would be possible without you. I'm so grateful that you choose to tune in, that you share your stories, and continually support this podcast. This is a recap of just a few of the behind the scenes highlights of the year and what that means for 2019. If you're in the L.A. area, hopefully we can meet :) And if you've been curious about painting in Italy with JSS in Civita… I have some news! I hope to see you there in 2019! Enjoy your holidays with your family and friends, may 2019 bring you loads of love, laughter, and painting bliss! Talk soon, ~Antrese
Happy Holidays! Here's to an exciting 2019,
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