Savvy Painter Podcast

Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
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Savvy Painter is a weekly podcast for artists who mean business. Antrese Wood talks to experts in the field about the business of art and how it gets created. Want to know how leaders in the fine art world of plein-air and landscape painting got their start? What habits do top artists have in common? Every week, we talk about representational painting, abstract art, alla prima painting, art competitions, art materials, watercolor, oil painting, how to get into an art gallery, how to succeed with your art business and so much more!
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast18 days ago
What does it take to hone your visual memory skills as an artist? Can you really build a successful business by selling your artwork? Isn’t (insert any age here) too old to get started as an artist? What am I supposed to do with all this time at home caused by the Coronavirus (COVID-19)?  Thankfully, my guest, Lucy Kalian was kind enough to take the time to discuss her answers to these questions and so many more. Lucy is a brilliant and talented artist who started honing her skills at 40 years old. She’s built two successful businesses and she’s an absolute joy - I can’t wait for you to get to know Lucy and her fascinating perspective on a wide range of topics!  Building your visual memory  What comes to mind when you hear the term, “Visual memory?”  Visual memory is the ability to remember or recall information such as activities, pictures or words that have been viewed in the past.  Is your visual memory game strong or could it use some strengthening? Like all muscles, if you want to increase your capacity, you need to exercise! Over many years of practice both in the studio and in her everyday life, Lucy has managed to hone her visual memory skills like a precision laser. According to Lucy, the secret to her success is nurturing curiosity and taking the time to study the world around you.  Delegating and working smarter  You’ve heard the old phrase, “Work smarter, not harder!”  While it might sound like a phrase that works best in the board room the truth is, it applies to businesses big and small. When it comes to the growth of your business as an artist, you are the bottleneck. You can’t do all of the things, all of the time if you want to grow - sooner or later, you are going to need some help. If you can handle the business side of things, great! If you can’t, no problem - just find someone to help you in that critical area. Do yourself a favor and learn from Lucy’s inspiring story of delegation, growth, and success! There is no substitute for time in the saddle  Do you ever find yourself wondering what it will take to unlock the potential you know you have within you? What do you feel like you are missing in your art career? While many artists find themselves looking for that one key tip or insight that will help them flip the switch, the hard reality is, “There is no substitute for time in the saddle.” Speaking with Lucy the message is clear, she is a firm believer in putting in the time and honing your craft. Don’t lull yourself into a false sense of complacency - keep striving! Lucy’s creativity challenge I wanted to try something a little different and I thought that now, while we are all stuck at home doing our part to “Flaten the curve” that it would be a good time to introduce it. I asked Lucy to take a minute and think of a creative challenge she could offer our community.  Lucy’s challenge:  Even when you can’t sit down to produce a finished piece of art - don’t put all that pressure on yourself. Use all of your observational skills all of the time. Really look at things. Something happens when you give yourself permission to think outside of the box and use your imagination. Wherever you are, take a minute to really look and think about how you would mix that color or arrange that composition. What do you have to lose?  Outline of This Episode [0:50] I introduce my guest, Lucy Kalian.  [2:40] Lucy talks about how she got started as an artist.  [6:30] What age is too late to become an artist?  [8:00] It’s not about the money.  [13:20] Lucy describes her artwork.  [20:00] The power of visual memory.  [25:00] Delegating responsibilities and freeing up more time for your art.  [36:00] Defeating the inner critic.  [41:45] How Lucy discovered that she was colorblind. [51:00] There is no substitute for time in the saddle.  [54:15] Lucy’s creativity challenge.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Tony Curanaj Grand Central Atelier Graydon Parrish Scott Fraser Resources Mentioned on this episode Lucy Kalian Track: Posi+ive Copley Society of Art Salmagundi Art Club Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcastlast month
What type of magic happens in the artist’s studio? Is there some special formula that “Successful” artists use that helps them maximize their creativity and studio time?  I wanted to take this opportunity to explore this critical topic with the vast spectrum of artists we have represented in the Savvy Painter community. From all over the country and the world, artists like you have shared their struggles, successes, and helpful tips when it comes to making the most of their time at the canvas.  Make sure you have a pen and paper close by, you don’t want to miss a minute of this powerful exploration of the artist’s studio!  Recognizing when resistance shows up Let’s face it, at some point in your career, you’ll face resistance. I focused a whole episode dedicated to this important topic: How to Beat Resistance (Advice for Painters) “If you’ve read Steven Pressfield’s book, the War of Art, you’re familiar with Resistance. Even if you have not read his book, I’ll wager you are familiar with Resistance, you just didn’t know it had a name, a proper name with a capital “R.” It’s real. It’s powerful. It’s a sneaky little bastard who’s not always easy to spot. Pressfield uses a lot of war analogies in his descriptions of Resistance, and he’s right to do so because it’s serious business. Resistance is at war with you, it can destroy you. Resistance wants to take you out, so I do see Resistance as an enemy. If I let him have his way, I’d stop showing up for you. Don’t worry, I’m not going anywhere – I want to help artists like you find your way to beat Resistance and do the work that matters most to you!” After that episode, I heard from a ton of artists like you who were eager to share similar challenges and helpful strategies they’ve deployed to help them beat Resistance in their lives. As I stressed on that episode, the first step to beating Resistance is recognizing how it shows up - and for many of you, Resistance shows up before you even step into the studio. From surges of anxiety to even building a physical wall of objects that prevent you from getting your studio, we all face Resistance differently.  The one thing that will help you combat Resistance in your personal and professional life is by setting an intention, it doesn’t have to be big but it does have to move you in the right direction. What have you found work for you as you combat Resistance in your career?  The artist’s studio, sanctuary or soul-crushing?  When you think of your studio, do you consider it a sanctuary or somewhere that is fraught with pain and anxiety? To say it another way, do you have a healthy relationship with your studio right now or is it a bit more complicated?  Cody, an artist from Indianapolis, described his studio space as a “Refuge where stressful things can sometimes happen.” This description speaks to the struggle of facing deadlines or starting shakily on a new project but that it always happens in the confines of a creative space. Remember, your space is your own. There is no “right way” to set up your studio - if it works for you and spurs your creativity then go with it!  My challenge to you  If you find yourself struggling to create the artist’s studio you’ve always dreamed about, here are some helpful tips from me and other fellow artists.  I challenge you to re-frame your thoughts when you think about your studio. Don’t let your thoughts automatically go to the stressful or frustrating aspects of your task at hand, instead think of what you get to do in your creative space.  A helpful practice I’ve picked up over the years is to center myself as I cross the threshold into my studio. When I cross that physical threshold into my studio, I take a deep breath and say “This is for me, I am here and I have something to say.”  If you don’t have a ritual that works for you to center yourself and start your studio time with intention, why not give mine a try, what do you have to lose?  Outline of This Episode [0:40] I introduce the topic of this week’s episode.  [4:00] Artists like you who struggle and cope with resistance.  [14:45] How do you view your studio? Is it a sanctuary?  [28:00] Vicki Sulivan and other artists talk about their relationship with their studio.  [34:00] A helpful practice you can try as you enter your studio.  [36:30] Studio tips from artists like you.  [43:30] Closing thoughts.  Resources Mentioned on this episode How to Beat Resistance (Advice for Painters) Defeating Overwhelm and Finding Clarity  www.savvypainter.com/faso Hole and Corner #SavvyPainterStudioTours Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
A Look Inside The Artist’s Studio, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast2 months ago
When you approach the canvas do you find yourself trying to tell a story with your artwork? Do you think you are telling a story with your art whether you like it or not? Here to explore these questions and many more is my guest and fellow artist, Rob Rey.  Rob’s artwork is often inspired by his interests in both natural sciences like astronomy and physics as well as social sciences like psychology and sociology. These interests commonly influence his work, as do a multitude of inspiring artists from classical art to golden age illustration and contemporary representational art. In our conversation, you’ll hear how Rob approaches his creative process, what he has learned from his career over the years, which artists have made the most impact on him, and so much more. I can’t wait for artists like you to learn from Rob’s fascinating journey! Telling a story Have you ever watched a scene in a movie that said a thousand words without using a single line of dialogue? What about an instrumental song that evokes feelings of joy or dread without using any words? From paintings and sculptures to music and movies, artists have been using their medium to tell stories since the beginning of time. What are the resonant, positive, and awe-inspiring stories of today? How can our expanding scientific knowledge drive our enchantment with the natural world and grow our empathic interests toward our fellow humans? Exploring these questions visually, Rob Rey hopes to promote or create the stories that best help us to achieve these goals. Make sure to check out images of Rob’s artwork located at the end of this post.  Chaos vs. Order Do you ever find yourself struggling with the tension between chaos and order on your creative journey? What do you do to cut through all of the noise and focus on what really matters? According to Rob Rey, he found a good balance between chaos and order in his artwork through trial and error. After years of practice and persistence, Rob feels like he has a good handle on the balancing act required to navigate chaos and order. What do you think of Rob’s response? What has worked well for you on your creative journey? Advice for fellow artists Listening to Rob describe his approach to the creative process and how stories have captured his imagination gets me thinking about what I love about my life as an artist. If you’ve been around the Savvy Painter community for very long, you know that I am always looking for ways to improve as an artist and I hope you never stop learning either. I wanted to get Rob’s take on what advice he would pass on to fellow artists. Rob is a huge fan of taking time to practice your craft - log in the hours! Let’s face it, the only way to learn how to avoid making the same mistakes is by practicing a new approach. What can you learn from Rob’s story?  Outline of This Episode [0:40] I introduce my guest, Rob Rey. [2:30] What led Rob to his career as an artist?  [6:15] Rob talks about his interest in stories and storytelling.  [13:15] Telling a story with an image.  [15:30] Resolving chaos vs. order.  [20:00] Rob talks about reactions to his artwork.  [31:15] Rob’s dream project.  [38:00] Relating science to our daily lives.  [40:00] Rob opens up about his creative process.  [49:00] Advice for fellow artists.  Other artists mentioned on this episode John William Waterhouse Alphonse Mucha J. C. Leyendecker Jeffery Catherine Jones  Frank Frazetta Resources Mentioned on this episode Rob Rey’s website Book: The Power of Myth Podcast: Radiolab Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Using Art To Tell Stories, with Rob Rey , Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast2 months ago
Webster’s Dictionary defines Resistance as, “an act or instance of resisting: opposition. b: a means of resisting. 2: the power or capacity to resist.”  What comes to mind when you think about resistance? Do you start thinking about all the things that are giving your resistance in your life? Do you have a resistant family member? What about that project that keeps giving you a headache? Imagine what it would be like to clearly identify and manage the resistance you face both personally and professionally. I’d like you to join me as I share some insights about my journey with resistance and some tips I’ve picked up along the way. If you are ready to make 2020 a more productive year - you’ll want to pay close attention!  Identifying resistance  I first learned about resistance when I read Steven Pressfield’s book, “The War of Art” in 2005. Before then, I had a hard time understanding why painting, writing, or any other creative endeavor was so hard.  Since then, I’ve re-read that book at least once every single year. Each time I read it, I have a different insight. If you’ve read Steven Pressfield’s book, the War of Art, you’re familiar with resistance. Even if you have not read his book, I’ll wager you are familiar with resistance, you just didn’t know it had a name, a proper name with a capital “R.” It’s real. It’s powerful. It’s a sneaky little bastard who’s not always easy to spot. Pressfield uses a lot of war analogies in his descriptions of Resistance, and he’s right to do so because it’s serious business. Resistance is at war with you, it can destroy you. Resistance wants to take you out, so I do see Resistance as an enemy. If I let him have his way, I’d stop showing up for you. Don’t worry, I’m not going anywhere - I want to help artists like you kick this jerk to the curb! Antrese’s rules for overcoming resistance  Resistance will encourage you to overthink, over analyze and over research to the point that your mind is so filled with data, you’re immobilized. I am the queen of overthinking and self-inflicted analysis paralysis. Since I know that is my tendency, I’m learning to make action my default. Over the years, I found a few helpful ways to combat and even overcome Resistance’s influence in my life. Here are a few rules I’ve made for myself, in time I may adjust them but for now, they’re working for me: Given the choice between consuming and making, I will always choose making. I can only research for 20 minutes at a time. After I research I ALWAYS take action. That means if I’m researching a technique, I can only spend 20 minutes before I try the technique. I only need to know enough to take my next step. Most of the time, that baby step is enough to get me going. So there are a few examples of rules I have created for myself and I’d like to challenge you to make your own. You may not be prone to analysis paralysis, but you’re prone to something, and Resistance will find it and use it against you. Take the time to identify Resistance’s power in your life and plot steps to mitigate and even remove its power. Trust me, I know it’s hard work but it’s worth it!  Outline of This Episode [0:01] My introduction to this episode.  [3:00] Some awesome feedback from artists like you!  [5:00] Let other people inspire you.  [7:00] How resistance shows up in my life. [9:30] Helpful rules that I’ve come up with to combat resistance.  [12:30] Using resistance to your advantage.  [17:30] How artists like you are dealing with resistance.  [21:00] Closing thoughts and helpful tips.  Resources Mentioned on this episode Steven Pressfield - The War of Art Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success Seth Godin
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast2 months ago
As you look at your career as an artist, do you notice how much you’ve grown and changed over the years? What led to the big moments of growth and change for you? It was a joy to sit down with my guest and fellow artist, Shana Levenson. In our conversation, Shana opens up about her experience as an art instructor, how her children have influenced her art, how she’s grown over the years, and much more. I know that artists like you will get a lot out of Shana’s helpful and unique perspective!  Empowering others Who was it that helped you along in your growth as an artist? Did you have a family member who took special interest in your creative development? Were others in your family supportive of your creative and artistic pursuits? Following in her brother’s footsteps, Shana Levenson had wanted to pursue a career as an artist from a young age. As she slowly carved out time to go to art school over the years - Shana fell in love not only with art but also with teaching. Shana got into teaching as a necessity but found that she really enjoys empowering others as they develop creatively.  Parenting and painting  As she finished her Master’s degree, Shana was also dealing with the end of her marriage. Not only did Shana have to navigate the challenges of life as an artist, but she also had to figure out parenting and life as a single mother. Juggling both parenting and painting wasn’t easy for Shana - especially when her ex-husband said that she could not continue using their children in her artwork. I couldn’t imagine facing the challenges that Shana has faced as an artist and a parent - I hope artists who navigate both find Shana’s story inspiring! Dealing with criticism  How do you respond to criticism and critique? Let’s face it, criticism and less than positive feedback are the worst part of putting something out there for the public to consume. In spite of the challenge that facing criticism can cause - doing so confidently is a key area of growth for most artists. Shana is the first to admit that she has had to strengthen her muscles over the years when it comes to dealing with criticism. Don’t assume that criticism won’t come - it will! You need to decide right now, how you plan to respond when negative feedback comes your way. What can you learn from Shana’s story?  Push yourself Do you have a habit of pushing yourself creatively? Does a new challenge thrill and excite you or do you find yourself running in the opposite direction? As I got to know Shana over the course of our conversation, I really wanted to get to the heart of what makes her tick. Considering my question about her positive habits, Shana was quick to point out the fact that she loves to push herself beyond her limits. A good example of Shana’s desire to push herself is her desire to work with lace in her paintings - something she had never done before. You can find images of Shana’s artwork located in the resources section at the end of this post.  Outline of This Episode [0:40] I introduce my guest, Shana Levenson.  [9:00] Shana talks about her experience as a teacher.  [13:00] How Shana’s art changed after her divorce.  [19:00] Pushing through difficulty and finding a new way forward.  [23:00] Dealing with rejection.  [28:00] Shana’s criteria for entering art competitions.  [32:30] Negative and positive reactions to Shana’s artwork.  [38:45] Shana talks about pushing herself beyond her limits.  [49:00] How does Shana approach the canvas?  [55:30] Closing thoughts.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Pablo Picasso Henri Matisse Jodie Herrera David Kassan Resources Mentioned on this episode Shana Levenson - Fine Art www.savvypainter.com/faso Daily Rituals: How Artists Work Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
The Growth Of An Artist, with Shana Levenson, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast3 months ago
If you are anything like me, you find yourself fighting back the feeling of overwhelm from time to time. What do you usually do when you start to feel overwhelmed? How do you cut through the usual complexity that life brings and find clarity? As we start the New Year, I wanted to take some time to go over some helpful tools and insights that I've gained over the years through experience and learning from my peers. I hope that artists like you will find something of value as I share some useful practices and lessons that I've gathered over the years.  Beginning with the end in mind  If you want to start finding clarity in your life, it can be helpful to begin with, the end in mind. Too often, people get overwhelmed with the idea of significant change that they give up before they get started. To make big change more manageable, try breaking it down.  Author Annie Dillard once wrote, "How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. What we do with this hour, and that one is what we are doing. A schedule defends from chaos and whim. It is a net for catching days." How do you want your year to look? Why not set some goals and start to work your way backward from there? If you're going to make a trip to another country, start planning out what you need to do each day, week, and month leading up to the trip. What works for trips can work for your art projects as well!  Say no to the right things One of the hardest lessons that I've had to learn over the years is to disappoint the right people and to say "No" to the right things. Let's face it, you can't make everyone happy, and you can't do all of the things! Part of ordering your life and your career is learning how to prioritize your time, energy, and relationships. You may want to take every opportunity that comes your way, but the truth is, that is not sustainable. If you're going to keep a healthy work-life balance, you need to decide on your priorities and stick to them.  Take action!  One of the worst aspects of getting overwhelmed can be finding yourself frozen with inaction. How do you react when you feel overwhelmed? If you want to make some positive changes in your life, you need to start somewhere. Even if you need to make a small step toward change, take it! I challenge you to write down the one thing that you will do today that will make you feel accomplished. Here are a few examples that you can use:  Knock out a small painting like an 8x10 or even a 3x5.  Set your studio up for tomorrow, so you are ready to go.  Open your sketchbook up and sketch for just 15 minutes.  Prepare canvases for the weekend, so you are ready to paint.  Choose one small section of that large painting that you will resolve today.  Write that email that you've been avoiding.  Make that decision that you've been agonizing over.  These examples are just intended to get you started. Pick an action step that makes sense for you - but don't put it off! Outline of This Episode [2:30] I give a shoutout to a few listeners.  [6:40] Why you need to figure out your life design.  [9:00] Where are your priorities?  [11:30] I describe my ideal day.  [19:20] Finding clarity and focus.  [22:00] Saying “No” to the right things.  [24:00] Action steps you can take today! [26:00] Closing thoughts. Resources Mentioned on this episode www.savvypainter.com/faso Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Defeating Overwhelm and Finding Clarity , Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast3 months ago
It is difficult to honestly talk about the most painful places of life - the times when cannot avoid facing our mortality or need to come to grips with our value as human beings. But in this conversation, Erin McGee Ferrell spoke about those issues with such ease that I was grateful. The ease with which she deals with those subjects is a testament to the healthy way in which she's faced those issues herself. Erin lit up my day with what she shared and the way she shared it, and I know that you’ll be inspired and encouraged as well. A few jewels you can look forward to from this episode: Erin’s current studio: in a church rectory, overlooking a cemetery How Erin got involved in healthcare-related work - and the difference she’s making The relationship of art to the deeper things we all experience in life A South American experience where Erin discovered a culture losing its artistic history How Erin’s art serves as her personal diary Creativity poured out when Erin faced her mortality Amazingly, as Erin and I recorded this conversation she had just passed the 1-year anniversary to the discovery that she had breast cancer. Throughout that year she had experienced all the emotions and procedures you might imagine and many that you can only know if you’ve been in those shoes. She says that the experiences of the last year pushed her to a new place of expression, a place where she had to release the thoughts and feelings that were bubbling to the surface from the deepest places in her soul. She wrote bad poetry in the middle of the night and she created art related to the things she was experiencing. She says… “When you tap into those really deep places of facing your death - stuff just has to bubble up. When you go that deep, you hit something and it has to bubble out of it.” A research project that proves the power of art on cancer patients Even before her own experience battling cancer Erin was deeply interested in the impact art could have on those fighting life-threatening diseases. She was awarded a research grant from the state of Maine to do an 8-week study which was called, “The Effects of a Live Painter in a Chemotherapy Treatment Facility.” The project was designed to provide exactly what the name implies - and measure the results. With the help of a friend who is a Social Psychologist, they conducted the study and published their findings in the Journal for Oncology Nursing. What did they discover? There were four primary findings... The presence of the artist lowers anxiety It changes the feeling of the environment It creates a spontaneous community among the patients As a side-benefit: the project lessened the degree of compassion fatigue experienced by the nurses Clearly, art and the creation of it matters in life and death contexts, making not just the experience of those undergoing treatment better but also helping those who care for them to provide even better care. Art is about the human soul - and we don’t touch it as much as we need to  Perhaps one of the most powerful points Erin makes has to do with the greater function art has in relationship to the human soul. In her mind, art helps us touch the parts of ourselves that are the most important, give them expression, and benefit others in the process. Art provides a vehicle through which to express things like fear, loneliness, mortality, hopes, and dreams - and to process those things through our expression. Erin sees our honest connection to those parts of ourselves as being vital to health and our growth as human beings.  In all of that, Erin sees herself being a “seed slinger” - a person who tosses things out without a lot of planning but with the hopes that they will take root and grow to the benefit of others. A recent experience regarding the placement of some of her books in the Alumni Center of her Alma Mater (Mount Holyoke College) affirmed that at least some of her seeds are doing just that. I believe it’s even more extensive and I am encouraged that she’s reaping the fruit through experiences like these. “My art is my diary” True to her description of the function art plays for us as human beings, Erin says her art is her diary. She creates as she experiences and responds to life. That admission is apparent in this conversation even if she hadn’t described it that way. Many of her projects and paintings are clearly drawn from the chapters of her own story and she has learned to have joy in the journey and to infuse what she does with fun. I so enjoyed this conversation and believe you will too. Please don’t miss it. Erin is a treasure and her contributions to the world through her work are far-reaching and significant. Outline of This Episode [0:32] The joy, humor, and faith in the future behind Erin’s overall work [5:05] A quick description of Erin’s artwork - loose, figuration, abstract, observation [7:01] Erin’s work process involves lots of play and experimentation [11:06] The outlet Erin found in art while battling breast cancer [16:55] How Erin’s experienced the loss of artwork skills and traditions in South America [23:15] “The Pirate Crew Paper Dolls” project [29:08] The organizations Erin is working with - and why she’s so involved in health care [39:15] Erin’s current project - 6 X 6 paintings - and the future work she dreams of doing [42:51] The most challenging things to Erin as a painter and artist [45:43] Art as a diary [49:34] Erin’s advice to herself as a younger artist Other artists mentioned on this episode Alice and Martin Provensen (artists of many 1970s era children’s Golden Books) Resources Mentioned on this episode Erin’s website: http://www.artistamerican.com/ Erin on Twitter: @ErinMcGeeFerrel Erin on Facebook Erin on “The Moth Story Slam” Mt. Holyoke College School of Art - Erin’s Alma Mater https://deanfisherworkshops.com/ - SPONSOR The Dean Fisher episode of Savvy Painter The Journal for Oncology Nursing The Pirate Crew Paper Dolls project Erin created The National Organization for Art and Health (NOAH) Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast4 months ago
Do you ever find yourself wondering why you feel like a square peg forced into a round hole when it comes to following art “Rules?” Is there something wrong with you, the system, gatekeepers, or all the above? I was thrilled to sit down and discuss this topic and much more with my friend, Michael McCaffrey. In our conversation, we also touch on his work inspired by his father, the difference between figurative and abstract work, why putting in time matters, and so much more. I can’t wait for you to learn from Michael’s fascinating perceptive and expertise!  Follow the “Rules” or forge your own path?  Are you a rule follower or a rule breaker? Most people who see that question will automatically know which category they fall in. Have you always been on one side of that question, or have you shifted over time? For Michael McCaffrey - permission to break from certain art “Rules” evolved. Practically, Michael had to change is approach to painting his father because he simply wouldn’t sit still for portraits. Even when he took photos of his father and brought them to the canvas for a reference point - Michael still had to give himself permission to push the boundaries and create his own set of “Rules.”  A unique take on the familiar  When I first visited Michael’s website, I was like a kid in a candy shop, seriously! Taking a look around at all the different subjects and perspectives he paints is truly inspiring. Most notably, I wanted to hone in on Michael’s work with his father. Michael and I both have parents in their 80’s, and I was curious to hear how Michael’s experience has been spending time and incorporating his father into his artwork. As he observed his father in his home of nearly 40 years, Michael started to notice how his father would pay particular interest and care to one part of his home while neglecting other parts for years. Make sure to check out the images of Michael’s work located at the end of this post - I know you’ll find it as fascinating as I did!  Putting in the time If you’ve been around the Savvy Painter community for very long, you know that one of the big mantras that we often hear from seasoned artists like Michael is to put in the time at your canvas. It’s tempting to succumb to apathy or indifference, but the truth is, nothing can get you out of a funk quite like time in your studio. It’s also in the studio where you begin to refine and hone your skills as an artist - you can’t microwave skill and success. Think of your time growing and developing as an artist like slow cooking a good meal - you have to give time for those flavors to work together!  Tearing it down and building it up again  While Michael is quick to point out the “Rules” that don’t work for him as an artist - he’s also quick to explain that tearing down inevitably leads to building something in its place. Facing the institutional challenges and personal struggles of life as an artist isn’t easy, but don’t forget that there is a community of peers who can help spur you along. Michael found that through the process of tearing down rules, ideas, or even his own artwork, there was a kind of freedom to reinvent and breath new life into his artwork. What do you think of Michael’s perspective?  Outline of This Episode [0:30] I introduce my guest, Michael McCaffrey.  [3:00] Michael describes his work.  [6:40] Working from photographs and memories.  [12:00] Michael explains how his concepts develop from his time with his father.  [17:00] Bucking against the “Rules.”  [26:30] Abstract vs. figurative work.  [32:30] Putting in the time.  [37:40] Why Michael likes the idea of deconstruction and reconstruction.  [44:30] Change is growth.  [48:20] Art that Michael would love to own.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Wayne Thiebaud Lucian Freud Ann Gale  Resources Mentioned on this episode Michael’s website ww.revelite.com - Mention you heard about it on Savvy Painter for a discount!  Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast4 months ago
Can you think back to a point in your career where you started to appreciate the transformative power of art? Maybe for you, it was the first time you went to an art museum or that one art class that opened your eyes to a whole new world of possibilities. From early childhood experiences to forging his own path in the art world - my guest, Dean Mitchell, came prepared to explore the whole spectrum in our wide-ranging conversation. I know that artists like you will really appreciate Dean’s valuable and seasoned perspective! Early influences matter As you look back on your start as an artist, was there an individual who encouraged you along the way? How did your early influences shape your journey as an artist? For Dean Mitchell, two key influences changed the course of his career and his life. The crucial first influence for Dean was his grandmother - not only did she raise Dean, but she also encouraged and empowered him on his journey to becoming an artist. The other key influence for Dean was his junior high school art teacher who wouldn’t let him drop out of art competitions. While we often shrug off these early influences in our lives, the truth is, they matter more than we care to give them credit for! How art can make you feel One of the most amazing aspects of art is the ability to evoke an emotional reaction out of the viewer. From sculptures that draw you closer to watercolors that transport you to another place entirely - art has the power to take you on a deep and personal journey. In our conversation, Dean was kind enough to open up about what he hopes to accomplish with his art. Beyond painting what most people want to see, Dean has been able to position his career in a way where he can challenge people with his art in ways they never thought possible. When was the last time artwork on an emotional level moved you? Taking risks Dean Mitchell will be the first person to tell you that the road hasn’t been an easy one throughout his career. From growing up poor and isolated from many of the opportunities, his peers outside of the south had to institutional roadblocks that are all too real for many black artists - Dean knew he was in for a challenge. To overcome these challenges, Dean needed to take some risks that most people would shy away from. Facing rejection and defeat at an early age would crush most budding artists, but Dean was determined that all these risks would eventually pay off - and he was right! Looking beyond social constructs What hope do you have for our society? Do you think things are getting better or are they getting worse? Let’s face it - headlines and news stories often push and pull us toward confirming our biases and keeping our culture compartmentalized. Imagine what it would look like if we started peeling away and tearing down harmful social constructs like the idea that one group of people is inherently superior to others. Dean Mitchell is convinced that art exists to play a definitive role in growing our imaginations and our expectations of how the world should work. What can you learn from Dean’s fascinating perspective? I hope you enjoyed getting a peek inside the mind of this talented and renowned artist! Outline of This Episode [2:15] I introduce my guest, Dean Mitchell. [4:20] Dean talks about what led him to his career as an artist. [10:50] Family dynamics and growing up poor in Flordia. [17:00] The value of early childhood art education. [26:50] Beauty in the midst of pain. [31:30] How art can bring hope. [38:00] Going to college and taking risks. [45:30] Dean explains how he became financially stable. [57:00] An insight into the mindset of many art collectors. [59:20] Dean opens up about his experience entering art competitions. [1:06:30] How art can grab you on a visceral level. [1:20:00] Why we need to see beyond our social constructs. Other artists mentioned on this episode Edgar Degas National Museum of African American History and Culture Resources Mentioned on this episode Dean Mitchell Studio Marie Brooks Gallery Dr. Ph. Martin's Black Friday Promo Code: SAVVYFRIDAY Astoria Fine Art Cutter & Cutter Fine Art E & S Gallery Hearne Fine Art J. Williott Gallery Legacy Gallery Mac Gryder Gallery RJD Gallery Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
The Transformative Power of Art, with Dean Mitchell, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast5 months ago
When was the last time you found yourself moved deep in the core of your being by a work of art or natural beauty? As an artist, you can appreciate the power that we have to draw on people’s perceptions and emotions. It was a pleasure to speak with the talented Nashville based landscape artist, Adam Hall. In our conversation, Adam was kind enough to open up about his connection to the ocean, how his time working in the music industry influenced his artwork, challenges he has faced along the way, and much more. You’ll want to pay close attention, Adam has some helpful insights and suggestions for fellow artists and parents.  Disaster and opportunity  Do you remember that moment when you realized that you needed to commit yourself to become an artist? Was it a decision to go to art school? Or did you find yourself slowly realizing that you needed to start drawing out your creative side? For Adam hall, the turning point in his career came when he went with his musician friends to volunteer for the Red Cross. In the wake of a massive tornado storm that impacted the Nashville area, Adam and his friends decided that they wanted to help the situation. In a twist of fate, Adam and his friends found themselves at the home of renowned Nashville artist, David Wright. Seizing on the opportunity, Adam peppered David with questions and sought his advice on how to move forward in his budding career as an artist.  Overwhelmed Fast-forward many years later, and you’ll find Adam thriving as a landscape artist in the Nashville area. Adam’s journey hasn’t always been an easy one; he has experienced his fair share of stress, creative struggles, and moments of overwhelm. Do you think that feeling overwhelmed could ever be a good thing? What if you could draw on the enormity and scale of an image or scene that was so powerful that it elicited an emotional response?  When Adam was faced with a particularly busy season of his life, he found himself going for an early run one morning. His mind was weighed down by the stress and frantic energy that seemed endless. Reaching the end of his run at the beach - Adam was moved to tears as the sun crested over the horizon. At that moment at the ocean, Adam experienced something that transcended all the chaos in his mind - it was almost like hitting the reset button. In Adam’s experience, feeling overwhelmed can lead to a positive outcome.  Navigating parenthood as an artist  I love to take the opportunity to explore the insights and lessons that my fellow artists have for their peers who also happen to be parents. Having explored this facet of life with many of my guests over the years, it never ceases to surprise me that while there are many similarities, everyone has their own unique take on parenting as an artist. For Adam and his wife, they found that their creative and professional lives thrived when they were able to plan and schedule their time effectively. Instead of a combative and haphazard approach to parenting - Adam and his wife were committed to carving time to their creative pursuits. What can you learn from Adam’s story? Outline of This Episode [0:55] I welcome my guest, Adam Hall.  [3:00] Adam talks about how he got his start as an artist.  [14:00] How has Adam’s approach to the canvas changed over the years?  [16:00] Artists who have influenced Adam.  [20:00] Adam talks about his connection to the ocean.  [26:45] How does Adam describe his style and artistic approach?  [31:20] Adam shares his routine and studio practices.  [35:00] How has Adam navigated life as a parent and an artist?  [40:00] Building relationships and networking.  [48:00] Refusing to take no for an answer.  [51:15] Adam talks about the challenges he has faced along the way.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Andrew Wyeth John Singer Sargent Gerhard Richter David Wright  Resources Mentioned on this episode Adam Hall's website robertlangestudios.com Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast5 months ago
Normally when I do these question and answer episodes, I get anywhere from 20 to 30 questions to ask my guest - for this topic - the questions numbered in the 100’s! Thankfully, Jake Hawley from Picture Salon was willing to take time out of his schedule to answer many of your questions here on the podcast. In our conversation, Jake touches on file sizes, how to take the best pictures of your art, tips for pricing your fine art prints, and much more. If you’ve ever considered selling prints of your artwork - this is the episode for you!  Should I buy a large format printer?  Finding a good print shop to work with can be difficult, and you may be tempted to invest in a large format printer to take care of it all yourself. While buying a large format printer might work for some artists, the truth is - unless you are planning on using the printer regularly - it’s a poor investment. Instead, consider taking the time to research and explore some of the print shops in your area or even using a service like Picture Salon. How to get the best lighting One of the challenges of getting good fine art prints is taking a high-quality picture of your artwork. Many artists think that snapping a photo on their iPhone will suffice - unfortunately, there are many additional factors to take into consideration. Jake encourages artists like you to use a tripod when taking a photo of your artwork; he also stresses the value of paying close attention to your lighting and how it impacts the image. Ultimately, if possible, Jake suggests connecting with a professional photographer who has experience photographing fine art for reproduction.  Materials matter Did you know that the material you choose to have your art printed on can make all the difference? It’s true! In our conversation, Jake’s answers to various material questions took us on a tour of papers, metals, and more. I’ve had first-hand experience working with Jake and his team while I agonized over which type of paper I wanted to use when printing my art. If you are wondering what type of paper to use with your art - consider giving Jake a call. At Picture Salon, they’ll help you figure out what paper works best with your art and they’ll even send you some free samples.  Tips for setting a price on fine art prints If I had one, I had a dozen questions about pricing fine art prints. I get it, putting a number on your art can be challenging - especially when it comes to prints of your artwork. In our conversation, Jake was kind enough to share several tips on accurately pricing your fine art prints. Jake suggests pricing a print between 3 and 5 times the cost it took to produce the print. Make sure to factor into your price the time the original took you to create as well as the time it took to get the captures. Follow up with Jake and his team at Picture Salon to get more helpful information like this! Outline of This Episode [0:50] I welcome my guest, Jake Hawley.  [2:00] What do I need to know about setting up a print shop on my website?  [5:40] Should I buy a large format printer or just use a print shop?  [8:40] What are the minimum requirements for a photograph of a painting for reproduction? [15:00] Is there a difference between flat color images and something that is more textured when it comes to file sizes?  [19:45] I share a story about trying to ship some of my paintings.  [26:45] Dealing with an under-exposed print.  [30:10] Why it’s a good idea to get paper samples before printing.  [34:50] Why lighting is so important when photographing artwork.  [43:30] What is the best way to take a picture of a painting with a glossy finish?  [52:50] How large should my photo capture be? What about file sizes?  [56:40] What does it take to keep an art reproduction safe in high humidity?  [59:30] Do you include an invoice when shipping to customers? What about dropshipping?  [1:06:30] What is the best way to sell your art?  [1:10:20] When blowing up an image 10 times the size, what is a good approach?  [1:17:00] Why it’s a good idea to keep in mind how your customers will hang your art.  [1:21:00] Jake shares some helpful tips for pricing your art prints.  [1:23:00] How to connect with Jake.  Resources Mentioned on this episode www.picturesalon.com use coupon code: SAVVY20 for a special discount  Info[at]picturesalon.com  Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast6 months ago
As an artist, one of the hardest things you can do is to push past your limits and dive right into exploring creativity. Do you find pushing the boundaries of your abilities exciting or nerve-racking? My guest, Andy J. Pizza, is ready to explore this question and a whole lot more. In our conversation, Andy opens up about his creative journey, what it’s like to embrace his ADHD, the challenge of copyright laws, and more. I know artists like you will get a ton of value from Andy’s valuable and unique perspective! Helping others Why in the world would someone start a podcast? I get that question a lot! While every podcaster will have their own unique spin on this question - I wanted to hear from Andy J. Pizza. According to Andy, the reason he started his podcast was to help more creative people like him! Too often, Andy saw podcasts and books written by creatives who looked a certain way and acted a certain way, but no one quite like him. Banking on the fact that there were others out there who wanted a fresh take on the creative journey - Andy launched his podcast, Creative Pep Talk. Make sure to listen to Andy’s podcast; you can find the link in the resources section at the end of this post. Let your freak flag fly! Have you ever felt like you were a square peg that was forced to fit into a round hole? That’s what Andy felt all those years as a creative who couldn’t quite fit in. After years of introspection and reflection, Andy finally concluded that he shouldn’t minimize what set him apart from others but that he should embrace it. How do you feel about Andy’s take? Are you ready to take on the challenge and let your freak flag fly high, or are you more comfortable playing it safe? Let’s face it; we need both bold leaders and pragmatic individuals who are ready to put in the work - which one sounds more like you? Finding the right pace I am so honored to get amazing questions and comments every day from artists like you - some just want to ask a simple technical question, and others want to dive right in with challenging ones. Over the years, I’ve learned a healthy balance between my work on this podcast and my own artwork. Have you found the right balance in your career? Andy encourages artists like you to jump at every opportunity you can get when you are young and inexperienced. He also urges more seasoned artists to slow down and find the right pace as they become more experienced in their careers. What do you think of Andy’s advice? Know thy self What is at the heart of your desire to create? Do you love to push the boundaries of your abilities, or do you simply enjoy the process? Maybe for you, it’s the ability to go at your own pace and follow your own inspiration that draws you to your work as an artist. Whatever your unique offering to the world is - discover it and embrace it! You are the only you that has ever been made - the world needs your voice and your creativity. Don’t be content to sit on the sidelines, learn from Andy’s helpful advice, and leverage your unique abilities to make the world just a little bit brighter. Outline of This Episode [0:45] I introduce my guest, Andy J. Pizza. [2:30] Andy shares his background and why he started his podcast. [12:30] I share a personal story about my family. [15:00] The real story behind ADHD according to Andy. [19:20] Andy talks about the impact his father has had on him. [22:50] Let your freak flag fly! [27:40] Andy and I talk about copyright laws. [46:00] Should you take that opportunity or let it pass by? [56:00] What to do when the opportunities start to slow down. [58:40] A missed opportunity. [1:01:30] Why masterminds and coaches ROCK. [1:05:45] Understanding how you tick. [1:13:30] Closing thoughts from Andy.   Resources Mentioned on this episode Andy J. Pizza on Instagram (@andyjpizza) Creative Pep Talk The Hero's Journey Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast6 months ago
Do you ever find yourself fascinated by the stories of artists who paint from sketch drawings? What do those artists look for when they sketch? How do they remember the right colors or where the light was coming from? Hoping to get some answers to these questions and a whole lot more, I was pleased to sit down with the artist, Tom Hughes. In our conversation, Tom opens up about how he found his path as an artist, what it was like working for the Christian Science Monitor, and more. I can’t wait for you all to get a peek into the world of Tom Hughes!  Hearing the call Can you remember that moment when you decided you wanted to pursue your career as an artist? Or maybe for you, the draw to an art career was more of a gradual revelation. Slow or sudden, each artist has their own version of realizing their unique path as an artist. For Tom Hughes, the decision to embrace life as an artist was more along the lines of answering a “Calling.” If you are religious, spiritual, something in between, or nothing at all, I’m sure you can relate to what Tom talks about when he describes his draw to art as a “Calling.” For some reason, I’ve found that language to resonate with many artists, does it resonate with you?  Picking up skills along the way  As you’ve grown as an artist over the years, do you attribute it to practice or learning new skills along the way? While some artists love to explore new methods and push the limits, others like to hunker down and become proficient at one particular approach. Tom Hughes did not receive formal art training at a university for college; he took the route that included self-education. As you can imagine, Tom’s journey hasn’t always been easy. He has had significant moments of confidence, like his time at the Christian Science Monitor, and he’s had periods where he had to take a break and step away.  Finding the right process Through all of the highs and lows of Tom’s career, the one constant that gets to the heart of Tom’s career is his willingness to adapt and discover the right process. Rarely do artists get described as process-oriented. We artists often get painted with a broad stroke and labelled as flighty, inconsistent, and emotional, just to name a few! Tom worked hard for years to hone in on the process that would work best for him. One of the ways Tom likes to work is by sketching his subjects before he goes to the canvas. Are you drawn to a more process-focused approach in your art?  It’s OK to change over time I am still blown away when I look back to the start of this fledgeling little podcast and the few friends I knew who would listen to see the massive following we enjoy today - it’s incredible! There are a few elements from those early episodes that you’ll still notice as part of the podcast today, but there have been many changes. If you don’t learn and adapt over time, what is the point? Too often, I find my fellow artists are more adverse to change and evolution then I had expected. We are the ones who get the opportunity to push the envelope and help the public look deeper - it’s OK to change over time! Outline of This Episode [0:50] I introduce my guest, Tom Hughes.  [2:20] How Tom got started as an artist.  [9:00] Skills that Tom picked up and learned along the way.  [14:00] Tom’s studio process.  [19:00] Diving into the details of Tom’s sketching sessions.  [26:40] Tom’s process when it comes to plein air painting.  [34:15] What is Tom’s color pallet like?  [40:00] How we change as artists over time.  [46:20] Tom’s struggle with watercolours.  [50:20] Why I love watercolours and life as an artist.  [1:00:00] Have tolerance for your bad paintings!  Other artists mentioned on this episode Winslow Homer Rembrandt Resources Mentioned on this episode Tom’s website Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Painting from Sketch Drawings, with Tom Hughes, Antrese Wood
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast7 months ago
When was the last time you really took a moment to slow down and notice your surroundings? Do you find that you are easily distracted by your cell phone notifications or the million other things demanding your attention? You aren’t alone! I’ve struggled with managing my distractions for years, so I was thrilled to hear my guest, Michelle Dunaway address this critical topic. In our conversation, we also discuss Michelle’s oil painting, her recent arm injury, how to be honest with yourself, and much more. I know that artists like you will get a ton of value from Michelle’s thoughtful perspective, enjoy!  Space to daydream and wonder What was your childhood like? Did you have a ton of expectations placed on you from an early age or were you free to find your own path? While many parents have nothing but the best of intentions - the truth is - a carefree childhood can quickly get pushed to the wayside. Thankfully, Michelle was given permission and encouragement to explore her creativity. Looking back, she is especially fond of the moments where she would get lost in a daydream or playing in a field. Michelle also points to a critical influence in her life, Richard Schmidt - he also took time to invest in Michelle and encourage her abilities both professionally and as a peer. An unexpected injury  Don’t you hate it when life throws you a huge curveball that you never saw coming? Maybe for you, it was an unexpected expense like a car repair or the illness of a loved one, or maybe your story is a lot like Michelle’s and you’ve experienced a personal injury that you have to overcome. After recovering from a misstep that caused an injury to her arm, Michelle started to get back into the swing of things. Before long, she realized that she wasn’t able to put in the hours painting as she had before the accident. It turns out that Michelle had re-injured her arm and now has to undergo surgery and an extensive recovery process.  Managing distractions  The experience with her arm injury highlighted an important aspect that Michelle had been working to focus on for years - managing distractions. From her cellphone to the news and everything in between - Michelle’s life felt like it was full of distractions. As a spiritual person, Michelle looks to prayer and meditation to help her find her center. Cutting through all the noise of daily life is no easy task! The injury to her arm has forced Michelle to become more aware and present - she still struggles with the distraction of her cell phone, but she’s making progress. What can you take away from Michelle’s story?  The moments that make you smile  Have you had a moment in your art career that made you pause in gratitude? Let’s face it; gratitude is not an easy attitude to cultivate. We can get so focused and caught up in what we don’t have or what isn’t going right that we fail to reflect on the good things in life. Michelle will be the first person to tell you that her life is filled with things to be grateful for. Looking back on her career - Michelle points out one person’s reaction to her oil painting of Richard Schmidt as a particularly remarkable experience. The man that was viewing her painting was moved to tears and explained that Michelle’s painting made him feel like he had met Richard Schmidt. What a compliment! Outline of This Episode [1:00] I introduce my guest, Michelle Dunaway.  [2:30] Michelle talks about her influences and why she started a career in art.  [5:30] How has Michelle’s arm injury impacted her journey?  [19:20] Michelle and I discuss the “Artist’s eye.”  [21:00] Learning to be honest with yourself.  [29:30] What does Michelle look for in a subject?  [39:00] Michelle talks about her experience working with Faso.  [42:00] A typical day in Michelle’s studio. [50:00] Removing distractions.  [54:40] Proud moments from Michelle’s career.  [1:04:00] Michelle shares a story about a painting that moved her.  [1:13:30] What is Michelle’s dream project?  Other artists mentioned on this episode Richard Schmidt John Singer Sargent  Monet Cecilia Beaux Jeremy Lipking Mary Oliver Stephanie Paige Thomson  Resources Mentioned on this episode Michelle's website Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast7 months ago
Have you found artists who paint Americana inspiring? Are you drawn to the romanticism and grandeur of the genre? How do artists who focus on painting Americana feel about their genre of work? I was thrilled to sit down with the talented and generous artist, Susan Lyon. In our conversation, Susan opened up about what led her to her career as an artist, why she decides to change things up, her dream of mentoring young artists, and much more. I can't wait for you to get to know Susan's inspiring story!  A captured imagination  When you look back at your start as an artist, who do you point to for inspiration? Was your imagination captured by the likes of Georgia O'Keeffe and N. C. Wyeth? Susan Lyon's imagination was ignited by a whole range of artists, including O'Keeffe and Wyeth. Today, Susan finds herself encouraged and inspired by her peers who paint Americana. Susan also enjoys studying and painting the faces of people she loves. Listening to Susan, you really get the sense that her heart is poured out into her artwork.  Practicing meditation  How do you deal with all the stress and challenges of life as an artist? What practices help you focus and unlock your creativity? For years Susan Lyon would practice meditation, but it wasn't until the last couple of years when everything started to "Click." By practicing meditation, Susan has learned how to calm her nervous system and ask open-ended questions. Meditation has given Susan the gift of perspective and peace - key elements for a healthy career as an artist! What can you learn from Susan's story? What practices have helped you in your career?  Don't chase perfection!  Have you been caught up in the perfection game? Some artists learn quickly how detrimental the pursuit of perfection can be - for others, it can take years. We've all been there - you have a particular idea of how you want your artwork to turn out but reality jumps in and messes everything up. It's at that point where you need to decide if you are going to keep pouring in your time and energy or cut your losses and start something new. Susan recalls how challenging it can be to realize that you've sunk way too much time into a project that needs to end. I hope you find her advice and insights as helpful as I did!  The power of group energy When was the last time you got so caught up in the electric energy and positive influence of your fellow artists? Some artists love to get alone with their canvas and explore the depths of their creativity while others feed off of and thrive in a more communal environment. Beyond personal preferences - Susan makes an excellent point about the power of group energy, especially when it comes to artists. In her experience, when like-minded artists gather and encourage one another - powerful energy is unlocked. Have you experienced that time group energy? Outline of This Episode [0:53] I introduce my guest, Susan Lyon.  [3:05] What led Susan to her career as an artist.  [12:00] Susan talks about changing things up.  [17:15] Reverting back to a safety zone.  [19:50] Susan shares the benefit of practicing meditation.  [29:30] Why Susan enjoys painting the image of people she loves. [35:00] The challenge of chasing perfection.  [40:10] What is Susan’s process like in the studio?  [45:30] Susan’s dream of mentoring younger artists.  [50:10] The power of group energy.  [53:30] Branching out with a one-person show and teaching.  [1:06:00] The power of vulnerability.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Richard Schmid  Georgia O'Keeffe Bettina Steinke Howard Terpning N. C. Wyeth J. C. Leyendecker Resources Mentioned on this episode www.savvypainter.com/faso Susan’s website Brene Brown Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast7 months ago
What does it take to branch out from traditional practices and sell your art on platforms like Etsy? Can you make a living off of an Etsy business? What should you look out for? Good news! I put all these questions and more to my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop.  In our conversation, Jenni opens up about realistic expectations, why it’s not enough to just build a shop on Etsy, how to plan for seasonal changes, and much more. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to build a presence on a platform like Etsy - this is the episode for you!  Addressing Criticism The last time I had Jenni on as a guest, we had an excellent discussion that resonated with a lot of Savvy Painter listeners. Just recently, I received a message that had some pointed criticism for Jenni and the numbers she shared regarding her Etsy earnings. In our conversation, Jenni breaks down why she shared the numbers that she shared and why she had to split up her shops to increase her earning potential. After our conversation, I’m confident that you’ll have a greater understanding of what to expect when it comes to building a presence on Etsy.  Don’t be afraid to test What is the best product to sell on Etsy? For each artist and seller, the answer to this question will change - especially depending on the season! While small prints will sell well for one artist - large prints will sell better for another. The key is to give yourself permission to test the market and find out what works. When it comes to selling your art - there is no one size fits all solution you’ve got to be willing to make adjustments and learn as you go. Jenni encourages artists to look around at what is selling, especially given the season.  If you build it - will they come?  Remember that old Kevin Costner movie, “Field of Dreams?” Wouldn’t it be nice if your business were as simple as setting it up and waiting for the customers to flock to your doorstep? Unfortunately - as many of you know - selling your art isn’t easy. Just like nurturing relationships with a gallery - you’ve got to nurture a relationship with your audience on platforms like Etsy. Consider sharing part of your story or starting a blog to feature artwork and projects you’ve worked on in the past.  One step at a time How do you feel about starting your Etsy store? Does it sound daunting and overwhelming? If so - you aren’t alone. There are so many artists out there who want to begin selling on Etsy and other platforms, but they don’t know where to start. I get it - I’ve been there! Don’t think that you need to have everything up and running right away - you don’t! Listen to Jenni’s advice and start one step at a time - break it down into manageable steps that you can accomplish at your own pace. For more information on how to start an Etsy shop - make sure to check out Jenni’s website! Outline of This Episode [1:10] I introduce my returning guest, Jenni Waldrop.  [5:00] Jenni addresses some criticism from our first episode together.  [12:30] Setting realistic expectations. Jenni shares some helpful examples.  [19:50] Testing what works and learning from what doesn’t.  [27:00] Should you be worried about people ripping off your artwork on Etsy?  [35:30] What is going on with Etsy’s shipping promotions?  [38:30] If you build it - they will come - right?  [42:30] Jenni explains how to break down your priorities.  [45:00] How do you deal with audience burnout?  [50:20] Preparing for seasonal trends.  [53:30] Building a presence and making a connection.  [56:45] Tips for building up your business and planning out your month.  Resources Mentioned on this episode Discover How to Sell Your Art Online and Grow Your Audience, with Jenni Waldrop Fuzzy & Birch Does Etsy Actually Work? Snapshot of a Real Etsy Business Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast8 months ago
I still can’t believe that it’s been five years since I started the Savvy Painter podcast. Back when I first started, there were hardly any podcasts about, by, or for artists. Today, there are a ton of options out there, and I’m happy to call many of them friends! On this episode - I decided to do something different - I sat down with a handful of fellow podcasters to answer three questions.
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast8 months ago
When was the last time that you found deep and abiding joy in your artwork? Have you explored the joy of painting animals and pets? Most of you know how excited I am about Trekell’s new Pet Portrait Competition. Guess what? I’ve got the judge for that competition joining me for this episode of the podcast!
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast9 months ago
If you are anything like me - you’ve struggled with how to deal with your inner critic over the years. There are a few things that have helped me deal with my inner critic, but I am always excited to hear what my peers have done to address this common issue in the art community. Here to share his unique and valuable perspective is the artist - Danny Gregory.
Antrese Wood
Antrese Woodadded an audiobook to the bookshelfSavvy Painter Podcast9 months ago
What does it look like to see your career take off as an artist on Instagram? Is it a sustainable model or has Facebook’s acquisition taken all fun and profitability out the platform? I put all of these questions and a lot more to my guest, Kate Zambrano.  Kate is a fine artist based in California specializing in realistic portrait art and figurative art, made up mostly of females. Sometimes described as dark art, her work is a personal study of human psychology and complexity. Kate creates melancholic body languages and expressions, capturing the nuanced truth.  I can’t wait for you to learn from Kate’s unique perspective - I know you’ll find what she has to say is knowledgeable and entertaining! Putting in the hours  Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy, and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal, and you can tell! Falling in love with charcoal Sometimes it can take a while to find that medium that you love and there are some artists like Kate who fall head over heels in love with their medium quickly. While Kate enjoys painting, she really comes alive when she uses charcoal. Kate says that charcoal fits her because of her very “Black and white” way of viewing the world. She also loves color and vibrancy and she loves to express that when she paints but at the end of the day - charcoal is Kate’s one true love. Kate has incorporated some of the skills she developed as a painter into her work with charcoal and you can tell! Navigating Instagram  Instagram - do you love it or hate it as an artist? Have been able to grow your audience and deepen your connection to your followers? Kate enjoyed a huge boon to her business and her career as an artist once she began posting on Instagram. Quickly, Kate became quite the force as a popular artist on Instagram - then the bottom fell out. A year and a half ago, everything changed with Instagram’s algorithm - small businesses that were thriving on the platform started shutting down left and right. Since they reworked the platform, artists like Kate have noticed that their content hasn’t been getting nearly as many likes or engagement as years past. Instagram’s change has had a huge negative impact on Kate and her business. She thought the decline in support was attributed to her skill and ability as an artist. Today, Kate is doing a lot better - she found a new way forward and shifted her view of success.  Kate’s view of success What does success look like for Kate today? With all the instant validation of Instagram no longer factoring into her view of success - Kate has had to rethink her personal definition of success. Kate is now focused on maintaining a positive attitude and a healthy mindset - she believes that forward thinking and staying in-tune with her emotions will put her back on the right track. Professionally, Kate finds encouragement in the positive feedback she gets from her peers - she’s not chasing approval, but she’s grateful to get it from her friends. Outline of This Episode [0:45] I introduce my guest, Kate Zambrano.  [2:45] How Kate decided to pursue a career as an artist.  [6:00] Practice and repetition.  [12:30] How Kate taught herself to draw.  [15:10] Kate describes her artwork.  [20:45] Why charcoal is Kate’s favorite medium.  [26:25] How to enter Trekell’s pet portrait competition.  [35:10] Kate explains how she got started on Instagram and what has changed.  [44:30] The challenge of making it as a female artist.  [50:10] Kate’s view of personal and professional success.  [53:30] What Kate is obsessed with.  [1:01:20] How to connect with Kate.  Other artists mentioned on this episode Sean Cheetham - Savvy Painter Resources Mentioned on this episode Realistic Portrait Art | Charcoal Workshops | Kate Zambrano Art Kate Zambrano (@katezambrano) • Instagram Connect With Antrese On Facebook On Pinterest On Instagram On Twitter
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