14Books
Of mathematics, dark matter, and quantum physics.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
Simpsons + Science = MAGICAL READING. No seriously - if you're a fan of The Simpsons, then pick up this book because Paul Halpern explains all the weird science in this long-running series so hilariously and perfectly.

Is the Coriolis effect strong enough to make all toilets in the Southern Hemisphere flush clockwise, as Bart was so keen to find out? If Earth were in peril, would it make sense to board a rocket, as Marge, Lisa, and Maggie did, and head to Mars? Just dive in to find out already.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
One of our favourite things about Professor Brian Cox is the fact that he was in rock bands before he devoted his time to physics. But enough about that. :P

How The Universe Will End shows us how vast and complex the universe is without all the complicated matter. Fresh insight, succinct explanations and compelling graphics and data makes this a wonderful, easy read for knowledge expansion.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
For more than fifty years, the world’s top scientists searched for the “missing” planet Vulcan, whose existence was mandated by Isaac Newton’s theories of gravity. Countless hours were spent on the hunt for the elusive orb, and some of the era’s most skilled astronomers even claimed to have found it.

There was just one problem: It was never there.

It's all science based, but "The Hunt for Vulcan" is an epic journey and quest if you will. Sort of like the space version of The Lord of the Rings (except there is no planet to destroy). It's got enough drama about the hunt for the planet, enough heart about the effort that went into it, suspense about its existence and the beautiful writing from Thomas Levenson makes his oft-forgetten episode in scientific history worth remembering.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
You have to understand why the discovery of the Higgs Boson was such a big deal in 2012. That's because the search for it already started in 1950s. Physicists from the US at that time convinced President Reagan and Congress to support construction of the multibillion-dollar Superconducting Super Collider project in Texas—the largest basic-science project ever attempted. But when the Cold War arrived, the project was abandoned.

Tunnel Visions is a riveting journey into the discovery into the particle, of the tough sciencey stuff that waylaid the physicists and the bureaucratic red tape that came with it. The book has over 100 interviews from scientists, government officials, engineers, physicists... to answer one important question: Is the quest for the answers to science's mysteries and questions getting too big and expensive to handle?
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
The idea of "infinity" is quite hard to wrap your head around. In fact, the ancient Greeks were so horrified by the implications of an endless number that they drowned the man who gave away the secret. And a German mathematician was driven mad by the repercussions of his discovery of transfinite numbers.

But science writer Brian Clegg lays out out simply for those who don't understand it - in a brilliant graphic guide that will let you explain it to your friends even!
Introducing Infinity, Brian Clegg
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
One thing we can't get enough of ever: The Simpsons. Which is why two books on it is nothing to complain about. Paul Halpern's is on science, Simon Singh's on Mathematics. No overlap!

In this book, he makes a compelling case on why the creators and writers are all math lovers, and how they hide so many hidden trivia, nuggets and easter eggs about math. With examples from specific episodes, Simon Singh brings to life the most intriguing and meaningful mathematical concepts, ranging from pi and the paradox of infinity to the origins of numbers and the most profound outstanding problems that haunt today's generation of mathematicians.

And yes, a lot of the writers on The Simpsons hold advanced degrees in mathematics. #squadgoals
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
Lisa Randall is one of those people in science you need to know. She studies theoretical particle physics and cosmology at Harvard University and is listed as one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People in 2007. Lisa Randall combines her heart for science with her clarity and charm to make this book such a compelling read. And it's by no means easy when you have to answer difficult questions like: How did the world begin? And how will it end? And why, oh why, do we exactly need science in our lives?
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
If you want a short read, then Lisa Randall's Higg's Discovery is your weekend pick me up. The discovery of the Higgs Boson particle was a big deal, naturally the number of books on this topic. In Higgs Discovery, Lisa Randall explains the science behind this monumental discovery, its exhilarating implications, and the power of empty space. The Guardian says this is a book for non-specialists and we're inclined to agree with them.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
The thing about mathematics and theories is that it's always a constant search for them, and the lifelong pursuit to proving it. And that's what makes stories like these so compelling and exciting to read. For over 350 years, proving Fermat’s Last Theorem was the most notorious unsolved mathematical problem, a puzzle whose basics most children could grasp but whose solution eluded the greatest minds in the world. In 1993, after years of secret toil, Englishman Andrew Wiles announced to an astounded audience that he had cracked Fermat’s Last Theorem.

Simon Singh's book is a journey through three centuries, and one relentless pursuit for a solution by countless intellectuals.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
Perhaps more biology than physics, but Brian Clegg's The Universe Inside you is equally fantastical once you scope it down right to our micro bits. He beautifully writes how your eyes are quantum traps -- consuming photons of light from the night sky that have travelled for millions of years, and of how your many senses have the abilities to detect warps in space and time. Feeling like a superhero yet?
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
For most people, quantum theory is a byword for mysterious, impenetrable science. And yet for many years it was equally baffling for scientists themselves. Manjit Kumar's Quantum narrates the life of some eminent physicists and their work and also gives a view of the environment of science at that time. The life stories of Bohr, Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Schrödinger, and others now have extra context in the backdrop of society and culture at that time.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
You can't have a physics shelf without any mention of Einstein. He may be a genius, but his work is so accessible as he simplifies difficult, complicated concepts. In addition to outlining the core of relativity theory in everyday language, Albert Einstein presents fascinating discussions of other scientific fields to which he made significant contributions.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
If the only thing you know about Schrodinger is "Schrodinger's Cat" (and not even the concept - just the term), then it's time to brush up on more on his groundbreaking concepts.
Bookmate
Bookmateadded a book to the bookshelff=ma3 years ago
Physics is a really difficult subject to handle, with many more sub-topics equally niche and hard to grasp. But this book is great for the laymen who really want to try their best to understand the best of concepts. Feynman was one of the greatest physicists and this book explains and breaks down his diagrams and concepts very simply.
bookmate icon
One fee. Stacks of books
You don’t just buy a book, you buy an entire library… for the same price!
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)