Small but Mighty

Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Press
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Galley Beggar Press is an independent publisher committed to publishing daring, innovative fiction and narrative non-fiction.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast month
Toby Litt's father wanted him to find about their ancestor: William Litt, a champion Cumberland Wrestler.William was one of the greatest ever 'kings of the green' — a man who reigned undefeated in one of the nineteenth century's most popular sports, taking home over 200 prize belts. William had other talents, as well. He was almost certainly a smuggler — and definitely published poet and novelist.But Toby knew that coming to terms with him would be hard. A huge and fascinating man, William was also troubling. He ended his life in poverty and exile. And as well as having to measure himself up against this apparent paragon of masculinity, Toby would have to uncover uncomfortable memories and hard truths.Would Toby like what he found out about himself along the way? As a novelist, as a son, and as a father in turn? Would he have to get in the wrestling ring?… Would he even want to?Using the nineteenth century as a guide, Wrestliana asks vital questions about modern-day masculinity, competition, and success. It is a beautiful portrait of two men and their different worlds, full of surprises and sympathy, and a wonderful evocation of a lost place and time.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A hallucinatory, fragmentary, and tragic fictional telling of one of the most fa-

mous psychotherapy cases in history, A lex Pheby’s Playthings offers a visceral and darkly comic

portrait of paranoid schizophrenia. Based on the true story of nineteenth-century German judge

Daniel Paul Schreber, Playthings artfully shows the disorienting human tragedy of Schreber’s

psychosis, in vertiginous

prose that blurs the lines between madness and sanity.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mighty7 months ago
Megan Dunn was in a hole. Her attempt to write a fictional tribute to Fahrenheit 451 wasn't going well. Borders, the bookseller she worked for, was going bust. Her marriage was failing. Her prospects were narrowing. The world wasn’t quite against her – but it wasn’t exactly helping either.Riffing on Ray Bradbury's classic novel about the end of reading, Tinderbox is one of the most interesting books in decades about literary culture and its place in the world. More than that, it's about how every one of us fits into that bigger picture – and the struggle to make sense of life in the twenty-first century.Ironically enough for a book about failures in art, Tinderbox itself is a fantastic achievement; a wonderfully crafted and beautifully written work of non-fiction that is by turns brilliantly funny and achingly sad. … Tinderbox is one of the most successful books about failure you will ever read.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mighty7 months ago
‘A unique and breathtaking talent.’ Scarlett Thomas“Gonzalo Garcia is so talented: a new deep and hilarious literary voice.” Dorthe NorsTomás' girlfriend has left him. She has, in fact, fled to Antarctica, leaving him alone in Santiago, where life is rapidly passing him by.Tomás is a game designer – but he can't see his ideas through.Tomás also works in a university – where he spends most of his time hiding under a desk.Tomás’ flat is falling apart. The band he used to play in is doing annoyingly well. He drinks coffee though a straw straight from the pot because he doesn't own a cup…This smart, funny debut novel from Gonzalo G. Garcia gives a new voice to a disenchanted generation. With its Chilean setting, willingness to play with form and uniquely messed-up central character, it's unlike anything else. But it's also universal. Tomás may be someone who ends up sleeping in a tent in his own living room. But his loss and longing, not to mention his jokes, will touch everyone.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mighty10 months ago
Jivan Singh, the bastard scion of the Bapuji family, returns to his childhood home after a long absence – only to witness the unexpected resignation of the ageing Devraj Bapuji from the vast corporation he founded, Company India. On the same day, Sita, Devraj's youngest daughter, absconds – refusing to submit to the marriage her father wants for her. Meanwhile, Radha and Gargi, Sita's older sisters, are left to run the Company…And so begins a brutal, deathly struggle for power, ranging over the Palaces and slums of New Delhi, the luxury resorts and spas of Amritsar and Srinagar. Told in astonishing prose – a great torrent of words and imagery – We That Are Young is a modern-day King Lear that bursts with energy and fierce, beautifully measured rage.Set against the backdrop of the Anti-Corruption Riots in 2011–2012, it provides startling insights into life in modern India, the clash of old and new, the breakneck pace of life in one of the world's fastest developing economies – and the ever-present spectre of death. More than that, this is a novel about the human heart. And its breaking point.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
"“A work of enormous scope and ambition from a writer who combines style, wit… and a rare sense of the ridiculousness of the human condition. Incomparable.” (Alex Pheby, Wellcome Book Prize-shortlisted author of Playthings)

Forbidden Line, the debut novel by Paul Stanbridge, is a monster. A unique retelling of Don Quixote and the fourteenth century Peasants' Revolt – it’s also a gleeful hybrid of science, pseudo-science, absurd theory and ingenious philosophy. Above all, it's a story about love, companionship, and two friends: Don and Is.

This profoundly odd couple career around Essex and London, insulting drinkers, abusing drivers, curing plague, and fighting each other and everyone around them. They are on a quest (as far as Don is concerned) to reveal the truth about history and to uncover the secrets of the hyperfine transition of hydrogen. But Is, like the rest of us, isn’t really sure what Don is talking about. All he wants to do is get through to the next day – and back to his family. Both of which turn into extremely tricky propositions, as Don takes him ever deeper into danger, and the very structure of reality begins to turn against them both…

Forbidden Line is a fiercely clever novel; it will make you question everything, and it will make you glad to be human. It is a dazzling achievement.
"
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
Chosen by The Observer as a Fiction Pick for 2016 and described as a ‘scintillating novel of ideas’, Feeding Time is a debut like no other: a blast of rage against the dying of the light. Dot is losing the will to live. Tristan is sick of emptying bedpans. Cornish spends entire days barricaded in his office. And Ruggles… well. Ruggles is damn well going to escape those Nazi villains and get back to active duty. The mix is all the more combustible since Dot, Tristan, Cornish and Ruggles are all under the same roof – that of a rapidly declining old people’s home called Green Oaks. There’s going to be an explosion. It’s going to be messy. And nobody knows who will pick up the pieces.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
Two stories of disappointment, regret and finely tuned hilarity from Joseph Mackertich. In Obsolescence, a reality television documentary maker starts to film his next door neighbour’s every move – and gets far more than he’s bargained for. In Ad Astra, a man goes hear a speech from the “stockholder’s stockholder”. It’s the ultimate get rich quick conference stump speech – and the last thing that most people in attendance want to hear.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A story that takes place on a train. About building a world out of matchsticks. About brothers. About drinking. About things that matter.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
“Raymond Ess is going to kill me.” This is what Steven Strauss thinks. He also thinks that he and his boss Raymond Ess are on a fool's errand. They're in India to buyan anti-gravity machine – something Steven is almost certain doesn’t exist, and something Ess is convinced will save his company from bankruptcy. It's hopeless, everyone knows. At least, Steven knows it – and he knows, too, that his boss’s grip on reality is growing weaker by the day. His fixation on anti-gravity devices is just one more symptom of a failing mind…… Or is Ess, in fact, as crazy as he seems? As you readThe Weightless World, you'll start to wonder. This fantastically entertaining debutstretches the limits of possibility. It shows that when technology becomes indistinguishable from magic, miracles can happen. It shows us our world anew. And as it does, it weaves a tale of friendship, betrayal, and loss that will move the ground beneath your feet.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A bomb blast. A face wound. A nun is there to help. But is it the kind of help that can be freely taken? This beautifully composed story about The Troubles is at once gentle, tender and explosive.
Nun On A Bike, Caroline Healy
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
You feel the weight of the past behind you. That same weight is being transported up ahead. You go downstairs, open the backdoor and listen to the hiss of lorries on the distant M42. Sometimes that helps a bit. You can't escape the past. Not when the past is someone called Dave who insists – absolutely insists – you're going to remember, you're going to let him into your house, he's going to sleep in your bed, he's going to drink your whisky… This story by Jon Fortgang will make you wonder why you don't have more of an idea of who Jon Fortgang is. It's that good. He's that good.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A new story from our first ever Singles Club author, Michael Stewart, in which, God has some explaining to do. You'd think that a conversation in front of a live audience would be the perfect place to do it. But He thinks otherwise…
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
First published in 1945, In Youth Is Pleasure recounts a summer in the life of 15-year-old Orvil Pym, who is holidaying with his father and brothers in a Kentish hotel, with little to do but explore the countryside and surrounding area. ‘I don’t understand what to do, how to live’: so says the 15-year-old Orvil – who, as a boy who glories and suffers in the agonies of adolescence, dissecting the teenage years with an acuity, stands as a clear (marvelously British) ancestor of The Catcher In The Rye’s Holden Caulfield. A delicate coming-of-age novel, shot through with humour, In Youth Is Pleasure, has long achieved cult status, and earned admirers ranging from Alan Bennett to William Burroughs, Edith Sitwell to John Waters. ‘Maybe there is no better novel in the world that is Denton Welch’s In Youth Is Pleasure,’ wrote Waters. ‘Just holding it my hands… is enough to make illiteracy a worse crime than hunger.’
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A moving coming-of-age novel based on the author’s adolescent experiences in China At sixteen, Denton Welch was attending school in Derbyshire, England. One morning, instead of taking the train to school, he caught a bus traveling in the opposite direction with no real plan except to start a new adventure. Although he reluctantly returned to school at his family’s bidding, he soon received a letter postmarked from Shanghai—a letter from his father suggesting that Denton join him China.So began a momentous journey that would shape young Denton Welch’s life. Leaving behind his companions at school as well as the life he had known, he traveled across the globe to China, where he was seized with a sense of wonder completely new to him. It was there, so far from his roots, that young Denton began to explore his ambitions, aspirations, and secret desires.Written with an artist’s keen sensibility for observation and inspired by J. R. Ackerley’s Hindoo Holiday, Maiden Voyage is an unforgettable tale of growing up and discovering oneself.
Maiden Voyage, Denton Wlech
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
At the age of twenty, the novelist Denton Welch suffered a cycling accident that left him partially paralyzed; the injuries that he sustained were to leave him in almost constant pain for the rest of his life, as well as bestowing upon him the spinal tuberculosis that would kill him at the age of 33. A Voice Trough a Cloud – increasingly regarded as Welch's masterpiece – is his account of this accident and the period of convalescence soon after. The unsparing chronicle of the world of a hospital patient – riddled with anger, boredom, almost unbearable stabs of pain and sharp flashes of humour – A Voice Trough a Cloud is, as John Updike wrote in The New Yorker, “An incomparable account of shattered flash and refracted spirit.” His third and final novel, and written at a point when Welch could write for no more than a few minutes a day, A Voice Trough A Cloud is nonetheless possibly one of the most complete accounts of health and mortality; as Edmund White says, it is a book of “long slow dying”, “through which all the world's strangeness can be perceived.”
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
Knotweed grows fast and grows strong. Helena has something growing in her too. Which is just part of the reason she can't live in Hackney any more…
Knotweed, Gary Budden
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A wonderful new mini-collection from Galley Beggar favourite and soon to be superstar, Samuel Wright.
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
A new collection from one of the UK's most celebrated biographers, novelists, critics – and, as these stories show, a quite brilliant artist. Wrote For Luck ranges from North Norfolk to Chicago, from sordid old antique dealers to glamorous young writers, from glorious local gossips to frustrated academics. The stories abound with gleeful absurdity, waspish humour, and exquisitely awkward, delightfully English conversations. But they are also rich in melancholy and the heady sadness of people struggling to find a place in the world. Some are fascinatingly strange; others are uncomfortably familiar. Some are simply hilarious – and all are touchingly human
Galley Beggar Press
Galley Beggar Pressadded a book to the bookshelfSmall but Mightylast year
There were three or four other Terrapins in the dining room by now: innocuous-looking men in sober suits, who peered respectfully at the wine list and the framed photograph of the Duke of Windsor drinking a cocktail and looking as if he had just stepped in something nasty. An excerpt from D.J. Taylor's new collection Wrote For Luck, Birthday Lunch is a story of years passing, years wasted and bloody awkward conversations…
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