30° South Publishers

30° South Publishers
14Books
0Followers
30° SOUTH PUBLISHERS was formed in South Africa in 2005, with the express purpose of publishing African, particularly southern African, history and military history.
    30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    In 1999 seventeen Bulgarian nurses are kidnapped from the hospital in which they work in Benghazi, Libya and are confined in a police station in the capital Tripoli. The next eight and a half years five of them will spend in different prisons accused of deliberately infecting more than 400 children with HIV.
    “Notes from Hell” is a confession of an ordinary woman whose face becomes familiar to the whole world. The book tells about her work in Benghazi, about the reasons for the infection of the children, about the monstrous tortures she suffered, the terror, uncertainty and friendship in the Libyan prisons, about what it feels like to have three death sentences and survive.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    All is not as it seems on the El Camino to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain. Among the thousands of pilgrims is a calculating thief who attempts to use the bustle of Holy Week to smuggle out a valuable ancient manuscript. In the tradition of the Canterbury Tales, a group of travellers and a guide journey for five days exchanging their personal backgrounds among the scenic beauty. Each has something to hide.These colourful characters come from all walks of life and different continents. Their pilgrimage enables them to learn something of the origins of the historic walk as well as a great deal about themselves. Declan, Victoria and Liam come from Ireland; Vicky, a Canadian photographer, won the trip in a competition and decides to bring her friend Andrea along; Santie and Heila are sisters from South Africa and Georgina, a British police consultant who follows the path of the manuscript and ultimately solves the mystery in an exciting denouement. Part travelogue, part drama, this whodunit will keep the reader’s attention in a rollicking ride which encompasses an unexpected twist in the tail. The subplot will tug at the heartstrings revealing greed, duplicity and human frailty. The author walked the path described in the novel thus authenticating its portrayal.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    This collection of stories, rooted in truth and legend, from a forgotten time in South Africa’s past, the Forties, and a little-known part, the Lowveld, is a window into a magical time when people were uncluttered by philosophical baggage and worked for one purpose: to make a living to enjoy life. “An enchanting collection of Lowveld tales, packed with eccentric characters, bush lore and African magic. Wilf Nussey’s considerable talent as a raconteur has produced a great read, filled with humour and charm.”—Jo-Anne Richards, bestselling author of The Innocence of Roast Chicken, Touching the Lighthouse, My Brother’s Book and The Imagined Child
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    The second Boer War is the most important war in South African history; indeed, without it, South Africa would likely have not existed. But it’s also one of the least understood conflicts of the era. Over a century of Leftist bleating and insidious, self-serving revisionism, first by Afrikaner nationalists and then by the apartheid regime, has left the layman with a completely skewed view of the war. Incredibly, most people will tell you that the British attacked the Boers to steal their gold, and that when the clueless, red-jacketed Tommies advanced under orders of bumptious, incompetent British generals they were mowed down in their thousands. Others think of the conflict in terms of ‘Britain against South Africa’ and many believe that the Boers actually won the war; the marginally more enlightened explain away the Boer defeat by claiming it took millions of British troops to beat them, or that it was only the ‘genocide’ of the concentration camps which forced the plucky Boers to throw in the towel. It’s all bosh. This book will take everything you thought you ‘knew’ about the war and turn it on its head. From Kruger’s expansionist dream of an Afrikaans empire ‘from the Zambesi to the Cape’, to the murder and devastation wrought on Natal by his invading commandos, to the savage massacres of thousands of blacks committed by the ‘gallant’ bitter-einders, the reader will have his eyes opened to the brutal realities of the conflict, and be forced to reassess previously held notions of the rights and wrongs of the war. Hard-hitting and uncomfortable reading for those who do not want their bubble of ignorance burst, Kruger, Kommandos & Kak exposes that side of the Boer War which the apartheid propaganda machine didn’t want you to know about.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    This is the true story of Irving Tucker, who married an English girl, Yvonne, and left South Africa in 1976 to farm sheep on the Welsh border, growing their own organic vegetables and living a healthy life style. They returned to South Africa every year on holiday. The couple was childless.The book deals with Irving’s complex personality and his love of practical jokes, and traces the relationship between him and the writer over the period 1961–2011. The death of Yvonne in 2010 is the primary reason why Irving announces to his friends that he is going to kill himself; this despite the fact that he is healthy, relatively young and has recently sold a piece of art for over £1 million. For two years following Yvonne’s death, his friends attempt to dissuade him from committing suicide, never sure whether it is a cry for help, an attempt to get attention, another practical joke or a serious threat. He sponsors an elephant-collaring in the bush and invites a group of friends to join him for this last African adventure. Around the campfire at night, he and his friends openly discuss his plans. The polarized reactions of Tucker’s confidants range from vehement denial to vehement support, as he advises them that his suicide date is rapidly approaching. In January 2011 he returns home to England, his deadline the end of February. Irving Tucker is a complex character with great attributes and glaring faults. This is a story of love, friendship and caring, of laughter, fun, sadness and tragedy. It is the story of a man determined to leave this world at a time of his choosing.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    In this book we are given a unique view of East Africa of the 1950s; not the stereotyped picture of wildlife safaris and leaping Masai, but the emerging independence struggle of a new African nation from the viewpoint of a white police office, in an exceptionally detailed, thoroughly readable, firsthand account of a rare period of recent history. It tells how an Australian veteran, fresh from the Korean War, became a colonial police officer in Tanganyika Territory (later Tanzania after federation with the offshore islands of Zanzibar in 1964). The reader is taken on a journey which tourists in Africa never see: from back alleys and police cells in the polyglot city of Dar es Salaam, to snake-infested camps on Uganda–Ruanda border patrols, and on police field force emergency operations from barracks at the foot of Kilimanjaro. There is much here to discover about a mostly benign semi-colonial period in Africa which lasted less than fifty years, passing, in one African’s description, as briefly as a butterfly’s heartbeat; where a few conscientious white administrators and their loyal African assistants managed vast regions of a desolate territory with remarkably selfless care and scarce resources; where things worked most of the time, but sometimes where chaos reigned. It is about the country itself, its ubiquitous animals and its people at close range, including villagers, criminals, hunters, witch doctors, and colonial officials, but most of all, the African askari policemen who were the author’s close—and often only—companions.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    Why does the zebra have stripes and the elephant a long trunk? How did the giraffe acquire a long neck and why does a hippopotamus lie in muddy water all day? How does an acacia tree kill grazing wild? Do wild animals speak to each other and do they have feelings?In The Greatest Safari, the reader is taken on an African adventure and told stories about the feelings, senses and communication of the savannah’s many inhabitants. From sausage trees, cycads, termites and ants to lions, hyenas, bats and gorillas.This book deals with the mechanisms that propelled life. We humans have acquired the facility of feeling we are something special, and thus also the feeling that we constitute an evolutionary zenith. In contradiction to this, nature is indifferent and within its boundaries there is only one criterion for success, namely survival. What the brain can produce in terms of poetry and nuclear physics is beneath notice compared with the ability to survive. If we accept the prehistoric people Homo habilis and Homo erectus as the first human beings on Earth, bacteria are still thousands of times older and are currently the most successful organism.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    Ronnie Selley, a South African from rural Natal, joined the RAF on a short-service commission in 1937, considered the Golden Age of aviation. During these glory years of Howard Hughes and Amelia Earhart few guessed at the brewing storm and dark days to come. After completing his training on antiquated First World War aircraft, Selley was posted to 220 Squadron Coastal Command, the RAF’s under-staffed and under-equipped poor relation to the more prestigious Fighter and Bomber Commands. Tasked with reconnaissance, convoy patrols and submarine-hunting the pilots of Coastal Command chalked up more flying hours than any other RAF Command. It was not uncommon for pilots to be in the air, searching the waters of the North Atlantic, for up to sixteen hours a day, in aircraft that were neither capable of such ranges nor, initially, adequately armed to defend their charges. From the outbreak of war until after its cessation Coastal Command had aircraft in the air twenty-four hours a day, every single day. The toll this took on the men of Coastal Command was unthinkable.The first RAF pilot to sink a German U-boat, Selley went on the win the DFC for his actions during the Dunkirk evacuation. He won high praise and newspaper headlines such as “Plane fights 13 German warships”, “One RAF man bombs 3 ships, routs Nazis” and “One against eight” were not uncommon. Selley subsequently suffered acute battle fatigue and spent time convalescing at the Dunblane Hydro. Thereafter, he was posted by the Air Ministry as Air Vice-Marshal Breese’s personal pilot. On 5 March 1941 Ronnie Selley, Air Vice-Marshal Breese and the entire crew of the fully armed Lockheed Hudson they was flying experienced engine problems, lost speed, stalled and exploded on impact at Wick in northern Scotland.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    Mine-protected and mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicles are today standard in the US, most major western armed forces and many other armies as a result of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The South African Army was already routinely using mine-protected armored personnel carriers and patrol vehicles forty years ago even if they looked primitive and ungainly. A few years later, the South African Army had reached the stage where it could deploy entire combat groups into battle zones equipped with only mine-protected vehicles, including their ambulances and supply trucks. By then the mine-protected vehicles had also become effective for use in combat, rather than just protected transport, the Casspir being the chief example. More to the point, they saved countless soldiers and policemen from death or serious injury, and the basic concepts now live on in the various MRAP types in service today. The valuable lessons learned by the South Africans with their early designs of these combat-proven vehicles has led the country to become one of the global leaders in the design of MRAPs which are locally manufactured and exported around the world. Surviving the Ride is a fascinating pictorial account featuring more than 120 of these unique South African-developed vehicles, spanning a forty-year period, with over 280 photographs, many of which are previously unpublished.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    Interest in KwaZulu-Natal’s battlefields — especially those of the Anglo-Zulu War — has soared since the film Zulu first screened in 1964, followed by Zulu Dawn in 1979 (the centenary of the Anglo-Zulu War). During the centenary, the famous battlefields of Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift were made ‘tourist-friendly’ by the then Natal Provincial Administration and controls were put in place by the heritage authorities to prevent relics from being plundered. Supported by effective marketing from the Battlefield Route Association and the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Tourism Authority, the battlefields have become a must-see. Indeed, Rorke’s Drift has become a tourist icon. Specialist battlefield guides have been trained and are considered to be among the best in the world. New hotels and lodges have been built with battlefield tourism resulting in the creation of an estimated 7,500 permanent jobs in what is termed the Battlefield Region. There are, of course, many more Anglo-Zulu War sites to be seen: Discovering the Battlefields will enable visitors to find them and to read an account that is not too lengthy yet has sufficient content to bring it to life. GPS coordinates will enable those wishing to undertake a journey of exploration. The book is also a useful training manual for prospective battlefield guides. Above all, however, the author shares his knowledge gleaned from over 50 years of researching the Anglo-Zulu War. He has blended firsthand accounts passed on from participants on both sides to subsequent generations with official or newly researched information that has become available in recent years. It is written in a style that is neither technical nor dramatic, is extensively illustrated with photographs of personalities and places and includes comprehensive maps of all the battle sites.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    This is the story of the 1820 Settler, Jeremiah Goldswain, in his own words. After thirty-eight years on the eastern boundary of the Cape Colony, he sat down to write his memoirs. It is a close-up view of four decades during a period when the British Empire was expanding in southern Africa, with the borders being pushed ever farther into the hinterland by successive governors. As a result, there was constant conflict between the African tribes and the colonists. Jeremiah was directly involved in three of the nine Frontier Wars that occurred between 1779 and 1879. It is the story of hardship and the struggle for survival of Jeremiah and his family—his wife Eliza and their ten children—on one of the most volatile borders the world has ever seen. Even in peacetime the conflict and violent clash of cultures were constantly present and many settlers were murdered, including members of Jeremiah’s family. Through all this we see a man making his way in a world he could not have imagined while growing up in rural Buckinghamshire. He lived during an important historical time for South Africa, not only observing and fighting the wars, but meeting and serving with some of the most famous names in South African history. He saw, in detail, the effects of the Cattle Killing of 1856, the Boer uprising in the Orange River Sovereignty, as well as several other famous and notorious historical events. The text has been published once only— by the van Riebeeck Society in 1949—and since then has been used by scholars and historians as a primary source. It has not been widely read, because Jeremiah had no education, and although he had an extraordinary ability to describe experience and express his emotions, he was a stranger to the conventions of written language. Now Ralph Goldswain has transcribed the original text into an accessible account of forty years of frontier history.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publishers4 months ago
    Toc Walsh was conscripted into intake 138 Depot Rhodesia Regiment on 18 April 1974 and endured a year of what he deemed to be ‘military mayhem’. In July 1976, he was drafted again with the 10th Battalion Rhodesia Regiment to continue his wild ride into the maniacal world of combat. The country was in a state of national emergency and all available men were called up on continuous service. Mampara is a no-holds-barred look at one man’s lived experience of war.The title of the book stems from the Shona word mampara that is said to originate from the slurred bark of the male Chacma baboon. The baboon indulges in alcohol-laden fermented fruit in an attempt to attain courage for difficult endeavors such as courting a female. In many ways, us as humans indulge in the same practice especially in times of intense stress or hardships. Young men experiencing the intense stresses of combat become, like the baboon, hungry for a way to cope.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publisherslast year
    A fast-moving, action-packed account of Granger Korff’s two years’ service during 1980/81 with 1 Parachute Battalion at the height of the South African ‘bush war’ in South West Africa (Namibia) and Angola. Apart from the ‘standard’ counterinsurgency activities of Fireforce operations, ambushing and patrols, to contact and destroy SWAPO guerrillas, he was involved in several massive South African Defence Force (SADF) conventional cross-border operations, such as Protea, Daisy and Carnation, into Angola to take on FAPLA (Angolan MPLA troops) and their Cuban and Soviet allies. Having grown up as an East Rand rebel street-fighter, Korff’s military ‘career’ is marred with controversy. He is always in trouble—going AWOL on the eve of battle in order to get to the front; facing a court martial for beating up, and reducing to tears, a sergeant-major in front of the troops; fist-fighting with Drug Squad agents; arrested at gunpoint after the grueling seven-week, 700km Recce selection endurance march—are but some of the colorful anecdotes that lace this account of service in the SADF.
  • 30° South Publishersadded a book to the bookshelf30° South Publisherslast year
    “The strangest, most original book to ever come out of Africa and possibly the most important”
    This is a tale of redemption after a descent into the ether – set against a primal African backdrop; it purports to be a good read but also to have redeeming social value by providing insight into the solution of a fatal and universal malady – by turns humorous, dark, historically informative and, just possibly, uplifting. Briefly, the story, given in monologue by an ‘anti- hero’, begins in eastern Zimbabwe with ‘the drinking night that had everything’, including a brush with death via car accident. It sets the tragic-comic theme of alcoholism in a setting that is luxurious, exotic and violent. The narrative maintains momentum throughout and connects the disparateness of crime, killing, genius and sainthood through a sequence of travel to all corners of the world. There is a strong metaphysical overprint to this true-life journey and the readers will come out the other side able to identify, at some level with the text, somewhat refreshed, enlightened and made stronger in their life’s affirmation. In essence, this is the purpose of Buffoon and the basis of its claim to be one of a kind. It is also a love story. Response to date from 20–30 readers of ages varying from 25–85, including eight different nationalities, essentially the ‘intelligent layman’ (architect/lawyer/surgeons/businessmen), has been astonishing.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)