Podcast: Good Beer Hunting

Good Beer Hunting
561Books14Followers
GBH is not a voice speaking only from the outside looking in, but rather, from the middle of some of the most rapidly changing dynamics that any U.S. industry has ever seen. The interviews go deeper and the articles work harder to balance the culture of craft beer with the businesses it supports, shifting the conversation with our readers toward the future of the industry we love and the tenacity of its ideals.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 days ago
    Welcome to the first episode in our Next Germination series, produced in partnership with Guinness. For those of you that have been reading and listening to Good Beer Hunting for years, you know how important the underwriting we receive is. Alongside hundreds of paying subscribers, whom we call the Fervent Few, our underwriters enable us to pursue big, ambitious projects. And no one has been more supportive and continuously so than Guinness. Years of support has helped us build an unprecedented editorial team in beer. This team has claimed dozens of awards over the years, including the North American Guild of Beer Writers awards, which we won roughly half of all those awards last year. The Society of Professional Journalists award. And this past weekend, a James Beard award. All this momentum and continuity would not be possible—not even close—without the support of the folks at Guinness. And today marks yet another step in that collaborative journey with the Next Germination series. When we were scoping out the themes and ambitions for this two-year stretch of underwriting, nothing was more important to Guinness and our team than extending that long table of beer to include more people who have traditionally been marginalized from the industry and its culture, which is often prone to a monoculture. For a brand that’s known and loved around the world, in countries like Ireland the UK of course, but also Nigeria, the Caribbean, and the U.S. where they built their latest production facility and taproom in Baltimore, Guinness’ future is directly dependent on the growth of beer drinking audiences, and the increasingly diverse and equitable spaces and cultures that surround it. This series—called Next Germination—reflects our editorial team’s desire to continue our own mission of helping beer drinking audiences get smarter, more impassioned, and inspired about the world’s most popular drink. It’s a perfect alignment in both mission and ambition. So what exactly is the Next Germination? Well, we believe the beer world is so much more than its homogenous stereotypes. Today, a new and diverse generation of drinkers, change-makers, and doers is continuing to push for progress in every direction. Their aims are varied, but their shared emphasis on equity, community-building, and access has deep reverberations that go beyond the liquid in your glass. So together with Guinness, The Next Germination is a series of stories and podcasts that celebrates the people making beer brighter and broader—and transforming its future for the better. In this first episode, I’m talking to Beth Demmon, one of our best writers and hosts about her first piece that kicks off the series - called “Keeping Neurodiversity in Mind — How Two Groundbreaking Breweries are Making Beer Spaces More Accessible” We both rely on our limited experience as parents of neurodiverse children as a way in to appreciating and articulating the experience of neurodiverse beer drinkers, and how the industry has an emerging opportunity - especially in its hospitably sector - to broaden its approach to a wide array of audiences with specific needs that could help center them in the future of beer.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting9 days ago
    Does the world really need another craft brewery? Honestly, no—but Daniel Muñoz and Jeremy Grinkey think the world just might need their brewery, which is coming very soon to the city of Orange in Orange County, California. It’s called Everywhere Beer, but they’re not just stopping at beer. The two co-founders, along with their partners Stefan Weber and Keith Pumilia, hope to create a space that’s comfortable, welcoming, and approachable for everyone in their community, something that unfortunately still remains a relative rarity across the craft beer industry. In today’s conversation, Jeremy, Daniel, and I discuss the future of Everywhere, but also their pasts. Listeners might know of Jeremy as the long-haired and long-bearded director of production at The Bruery, or as @Sour_Jesus on Instagram. Both of them are veterans of the wine industry as well as The Bruery, where their partners also worked before banding together to form Everywhere. What led four guys to leave The Bruery to start their own? As it turns out, lots of things, including a shared need to write their own legacies instead of perpetuating someone else’s; the search to find their own voices as artisans; a pandemic-inspired realization that our time on Earth is finite (so get busy living); and finally, a desire to expand representation in a mostly white culture. How do four dudes in Orange County plan to accomplish that? You’ll just have to keep listening. You’ll also hear about the ups and downs of finding their space, which beer styles and breweries inspire them, what consumers they hope to attract, which types of beers to expect (as well as beverages outside of beer, like wine, hard seltzer, and maybe even craft soda), and why they feel philanthropy is a crucial element to supporting their local community. The sky’s the limit: Or at least, their 20-tap system is. Everywhere Beer is tentatively slated to open in August 2022. Let’s hear about how they’re going to make that happen and where it will go from there.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Huntinglast month
    Some people call it boring brown beer, but others think of it as liquid from heaven. In a love letter to what’s arguably the most British of beer styles, writer Anthony Gladman covers the history, meaning, and future of Best Bitter in his piece titled “Don’t Call It a Comeback — Taking Stock of Best Bitter’s Moment in the Spotlight,” which was published on April 6, 2022. In today’s conversation, Anthony and I talk about the early, uncertain days of the COVID-19 pandemic, which spurred a collective return to familiar flavors, with beer being no exception. He found that comfort in a can of Best Bitter, brewed collaboratively between Boxcar Brewery and Mills Brewing. Unbeknownst to him at the time, that beer ultimately led him down this path of exploration into what the Best Bitter actually is, where it comes from, and how it shapes the identities of brewers over generations, even in the face of inevitable evolution. The style is currently at a crossroads, one where allegiance to history and tradition is butting up against changing demographics and contemporary craft beer culture. But despite those changes, it’s still a beer style that means something to many, if not most, British drinkers. Today, you’ll hear about that shared experience, what makes a Best Bitter a Best Bitter, what Anthony loves about the easy-drinking style, and his musing on where tradition may be headed. Don’t let the name fool you—there’s a loving sweetness in the soul of every cask pour of Bitter.
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Huntinglast month
    Breweries love to talk about what they bring into the world. In other words, their beer. Breweries tend to talk less about what they leave behind. Their focus is on the next batch of beer, not the last one. In a lot of ways that makes perfect sense...but if you want to keep track of your business, your favorite brands, or the industry as a whole, a forward focus can also leave a blindspot. Breweries imprint upon the world with more than just their beer. They forge facilities with both equipment and character. They create all sorts of physical objects like tap handles, labels, cans and bottles, coasters, merch, and so on.They create terabytes of information: websites, graphics, brew logs, TikTok videos, and recipes to name a few. Even more gets created in their name by other entities, from government to Google. Most romantic of all these are the memories, relationships, ideas, and inspirations that breweries create. They both affect us individually and ripple out into communities. On and on it goes. A brewery's imprint today is expansive, it's redundant...and it's fleeting.Of all the stuff I just mentioned, very little of it is built to last.Beer gets consumed. Virtually all brewing facilities eventually close, even the wildly successful ones. Websites get taken down. Merch wears out or gets thrown out. Computer files get lost or deleted. And unless we record our memories somehow, they'll inevitably fade with us. All this to say: as time passes for a brewery–or anything else in this world–what's known becomes limited to what's left. Imagine what gets lost in a year. Imagine what gets lost in a hundred.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Huntinglast month
    While beer is in the name of this podcast, we explore all kinds of beverage alcohol with our guests. In recent episodes, we’ve talked about alcohol-infused coffee, agriculture, filmmaking, and more. If you follow alcohol industry news—or just stroll through your local grocery or liquor store—you know hard seltzer and canned cocktails increasingly take up space on shelves and in conversations. All of which is to say, the entirety of alcohol matters more every day as people explore new options, flavors, and expand their own understanding and expectation of how they enjoy and connect to whatever is in their bottle, can, or glass.   These themes are what led me to Paula de Pano, an advanced sommelier, wine educator, and entrepreneur behind Rocks + Acid Wine Shop, a new bar and store in North Carolina. Paula is a longtime industry vet with an education in culinary arts from the Culinary Institute of America—that’s the “CIA” you’ll hear mentioned in this interview—and she is opening this new venture with a focus on ways to court all kinds of drinkers. Wine can kind of feel stodgy at times given its history and pop culture status as a drink of choice for older, more affluent people, but Paula is making distinct choices about how to stock wines and interact with customers that seem necessary to reach a wider audience. She’s taking a unique stance on who she buys wine from and why, and even the physical layout of Rocks + Acid is meant to provide an atmosphere where education feels welcomed, not forced.   The past 20 years has offered narratives of beer’s decline, spirits’ rise, and wine’s … consistency. It hasn’t really lost volume or sales, but it has faded a bit in terms of attention, especially for younger drinkers. So, while we talk about and see the evolution of alcohol into all sorts of flavored concoctions that line store shelves, Paula is looking to make wine more familiar, welcoming, and exciting for all.
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting2 months ago
    What were you drinking in the early 2000s? When we look back on trends and data, there’s a good chance it was a flavored malt beverage along the lines of Zima, Mike’s Hard Lemonade, or the star of today’s story: Twisted Tea from Boston Beer Company.   In her exuberant and extremely thorough piece titled “Spill It — Twisted Tea’s Unpredictable, Unparalleled 21-Year Success Story” journalist Kate Bernot unpacks everything there is to know about the cult favorite: its experimental origins, its shockingly consistent sales numbers, and the brand’s plans for future expansion in order to bring the gospel of boozy tea nationwide. Not that it needs to sell itself too hard—Kate describes Twisted Tea’s unusually fervent consumers, who’ve remained loyal for two decades and are showing no signs of straying.  In today’s conversation, we share stories about our own experiences with the brand and how craft beer’s tunnel vision can sometimes make us unaware of successes outside our own spheres. She also shares some of her insight into the when, where, why, and how of Twisted Tea’s origin—and wonders why it’s so hard to get the full story from its creators. If there’s one thing to take away from our discussion, it’s to have an open mind when it comes to what you drink. You may be surprised at what you’re missing.
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting2 months ago
    Today’s guest has been a bit of a ghost int he GBH machine for more than a decade - since our founding really - and he’s someone I think about every time someone asks me how GBH got started - and as you’ll discover shortly, he had no idea.  Greg Browne was the brewer at a brewpub in Chicago’s NW suburbs - a place called Mickey Finn’s. He was known for brewing a hefeweizen - a recipe he inherited from his predecessor when he took over as head brewer.  More importantly, for me, he was the host of a weekly Beer School at The Map Room in Chicago - a midday gathering on Saturday’s where guests would enjoy some bread and cheese and learn about beers in a thematic way - and the themes were whatever happened to be on Greg’s mind that week.  It’s an incredible memory for me - from a time when I’d only had a smattering of craft beer experiences to rely on - and I hardly considered myself a fan of beer in any particular way. It was just causal and sometimes interesting fun. Most of my bar experiencers a the time involved $1 off specials of Blue Moon and some Golden Tee. Not exactly sophisticated stuff - but it was kind of the Chicago way.  Map Room - and Greg Browne’s beer school painted an entirely different picture however. And I’m forever indebted to that moment when he served me my first Saison Dupont. That’s the beer that inspired GBH - and Greg is the one who created that moment, unbeknownst to him.  But that’s not the real reason we’re talking today - that’s a story we could have shared at any point in in past decade really. Today I’m talking to Greg because for the first time in a long time, I saw his name pop up as part of a new brewing project called Art History, and it recently started supplying two fantastic beers to Chicago’s Hopleaf Bar. As far as I know the sis the first time Hopleaf has ever had a house beer. The venerated tap list there is a target for anyone trying to make a name for themselves in Chicago’s beer scene. Brewers host parties just to celebrate getting on tao there for the first time if they’re lucky enough to make the list at all. So for Greg to have a new gig - and so quickly become a mainstay on that list as a pair of house beers - is an unprecedented achievement.  And for this episode, I reached out to Michael Roper of Hopleaf for his perspective on all that.  It was a sign for me that it was finally time to get Greg on the podcast, share this story with him, and hear so much more about his own. It takes us deep into Chicago’s craft brewing past - and paints pa picture of the future that I’m very excited about.
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting2 months ago
    The color bar may be Britain’s most shameful secret—even though it’s not so secret after all. In journalist David Jesudason’s intensely researched and deeply personal new piece titled “Breaking the Color Bar — How One Man Helped Desegregate Britain’s Pubs (and Fought for an Anti-Racist Future),” which was published on March 16, 2022, David shares the story of Avtar Singh Jouhl, a British Indian activist, communist, and beer lover who was instrumental in bringing awareness to and dismantling segregated drinking spaces in Britain. In this conversation, David and I unpack his process for approaching the piece: how his personal experiences and identity help him tackle thorny topics like racism, what he didn’t learn from the history books (and what he took upon himself to discover), which current events led him to write this, and how Britain continues to deny its legacy of racism both yesterday, today, and tomorrow through the residual effects of imperialism and nationalism. You’ll also hear a clip from Avtar himself, sharing his own experience in his own voice, as a part of living history. This is a good time to remind anyone who still thinks beer isn’t political how wrong they are, and how far we still have to go to ensure safe, inclusive spaces for all. Join us, right now, to hear about how one extraordinary man made an enormous impact in the fight against racism in Britain, what didn’t make it into the story, and what comes next, both in and out of beer.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting2 months ago
    There is a lot of calculated nuance in today’s beer industry. You have to be purposeful in your business plan, consider who you’re selling to and where, and what your company stands for. Good beer is the table stakes, and these are differentiators that help create a successful business. It’s not easy to carve out a niche, but it is possible, when you see all this nuance. In this conversation we meet Tara Hankinson and LeAnn Darland of Talea Beer Company. The pair are the co-founders and co-CEOs for the Brooklyn-based brewery, which has built its early success on attracting previously underserved consumers and creating a unique atmosphere at their taproom to appeal to all. You’ll hear them cite statistics and anecdotes as we chat, and their background in non-beer industries gives them a valuable perspective on new ways to differentiate themselves. I know it’s cliché to talk about how an outsider can bring new ideas and perspectives to old industries, but in a market where space is at a premium, both on shelves and in people's minds, Tara and LeAnn recognize what they can do to create something special and expand their reach across New York City. You’ll get to hear about what first brought them to this moment and even what they see as important next steps for themselves and the future of the business. All of what happens between is intentional, thoughtful, and works to establish itself within this complicated nuance that allows a company to make connections that can create lifetime customers.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting2 months ago
    Who wants to talk about money? We’re going to. I’m joined today by Jerard Fagerberg to talk about his piece titled “Pour Clean, Like the Source — CA Draft Tech in Oakland, California,” which was published on Good Beer Hunting on February 18, 2022.  In this piece, he outlines the creation, evolution, and expansion of CA Draft Tech, a sanitation service for taprooms, bars, and restaurants across the Bay Area. With the help of SMBX, an alternative financing company that allows consumers to invest directly in local businesses, CA Draft Tech was able to grow their business outside a bank’s traditional loan structure.  It was Jerard’s first time exploring the niche world of hospitality financing, but it’s probably not the last. He describes the research and writing process as a challenge, but a necessary one in order to demystify finances and introduce a level of transparency not often seen when discussing that big elephant in the room—money.  You’ll hear from Jerard about how the story took shape, how to best discuss the business of beer without ignoring the very real human element, just what bonds are, how SMBX taps into communities in order to elevate businesses, and why this model is well-suited to the high-capital, low-margin world of hospitality.  One note for listeners: This story was published as part of Good Beer Hunting’s Compound Interest series, underwritten by SMBX, which highlights different ways small businesses can get the funding they need; all of the businesses profiled in this series have worked with SMBX to achieve part or even all of their funding. And on that note, we have our own bond offering on the platform for anyone interested in investing in Good Beer Hunting’s future.
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    The long-awaited return and continuation of Foeder for Thought - GBH’s collaboration with Green Bench Brewing Company in St Petersburg Florida. GBH’s Founder, Michael Kiser, hosts a series of talks with wile ale producers from around the world in front of a live audience. Episodes from 2022: FFT-013 Khris Johnson of Green Bench Brewing Company FFT-014 Tim Adams of Oxbow Brewing Company FFT-015 Jeffery Stuffings of Jester King Brewery FFT-016 Christian Gregory of 3 Fonteinen FFT-017 Pierre Tilquin of Gueuzerie Tilquin FFT-018 Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing Company FFT-019 Tomme Arthur of The Lost Abbey
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    It’s been nearly one year since craft beer began to face its biggest reckoning against sexism, racism, and toxic work culture to date. In that time, there has been some progress, but there has also been a growing polarization between those making calls for change and those making accusations about an out-of-control cancel culture.      In the midst of this ongoing controversy and debate, Kate Bailey from Hand & Heart has been working to establish a first-of-its-kind foundation for reconciliation and progress within hospitality. As a consultancy that aims to improve business operations by advocating on behalf of workers, Hand & Heart developed the Mikkeller Reconciliation Program and the BrewDog Affected Workers Registration Platform in order to acknowledge, document, and hopefully reconcile issues to the satisfaction of affected workers and leadership at both businesses. These efforts have come with a significant amount of challenges: emotionally, legally, and financially. Some of those witnessing the challenges have raised some questions. How does this work? Who’s paying the bill? Are there any guarantees of a safe and satisfying outcome? I spoke with Kate Bailey and ask some of these questions, although it’s important to note that since our first conversation recorded here on March 29, 2022, several new developments have come from both Hand & Heart as well as BrewDog in the ever-changing controversy. In a statement made by Hand & Heart on April 2, Kate does clarify that payments were made by Mikkeller to Hand & Heart for mutually agreed upon services rendered as part of the Reconciliation Program. In a similar statement made in response to BrewDog on April 1, Kate explains that although Hand & Heart’s preliminary efforts towards reconciliation do not hinge on any promise of financial compensation, if a business were to opt into an individually tailored program, fees associated with carrying out the services would be agreed upon and expected as with any consultancy agreement. As of today, there are no current negotiations between Hand & Heart and BrewDog. Either way, at no point are victims or accusers expected or required to pay Hand & Heart for their services.  In this conversation, you’ll hear Kate explain her investigative background and when it dovetailed with beer, how she’s able to facilitate between victims and breweries as a third-party, the risks this business model assumes, and her take on what real leadership looks like. We also discuss that despite the impossibility of a one-size-fits-all solution, the effort towards healing is a crucial, yet relatively new model for the craft beer industry. Kate says people don’t want revenge—they want accountability. And she wants to help build that, despite the numerous challenges and criticisms that she, and many other activists, face when demanding responsibility from anyone upholding toxic systems.  It’s a high stakes process—and safety is top of mind for Kate every step of the way. Find out exactly what she does to ensure safety and establish credibility, how she aims to facilitate a two-way dialogue that requires trust on both sides to accomplish a mutually beneficial—if not sometimes uncomfortable—path towards positive change, and why she remains hopeful at the possibility of redemption, even when the evidence gives her no reason to believe. This doesn’t end wrapped up neatly with a bow. But what ever does?
  • Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    Craft beer is starting to show up in places where many of us have never been, and maybe never even thought about visiting. The small South American nation of Paraguay could be considered fairly remote by most standards: Paraguay is fully landlocked, roughly in the middle of the continent, bordered by the much larger countries of Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia. Its capital, Asunción, is fairly off-the-radar compared to popular South American tourist destinations like Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. And yet even in Paraguay, good beer is really starting to make waves, as the writer William Costa reported in his recent story for us, “Mother of Cities — Subtropical Wanderings in Asunción, Paraguay.” Paraguay’s location makes for some interesting dynamics. As a landlocked country, going to the beach for relaxation or swimming means heading to a river, not the ocean. While Asunción is mostly Spanish-speaking, Paraguay actually has two official languages: Spanish and Guarani, which is the only Indigenous language to be spoken by the majority of a non-Indigenous population in the Americas. And distinctive local ingredients, including yerba mate, cassava flour, and the medicinal herbs known as pohã ñana, are now starting to show up in Paraguayan beers. In this episode, I talk to Costa, a long-term British resident of the country. We discuss beer, his article, snack foods, and even talk about some unique sounds from his daily life in Asunción, Paraguay.
    Good Beer Huntingadded an audiobook to the bookshelfPodcast: Good Beer Hunting3 months ago
    As far as we can tell, many of the earliest beers ever made were actually beer-wine hybrids, brewed out of both grain and fruit. Fast-forward 10,000 years or so, and beers made with grapes are once again in fashion. Sometimes called “Oenobeers,” after oenology, the science of winemaking, Grape Beers or Grape Ales are becoming more popular in a lot of beer regions, especially in Italy and other wine-loving countries. In this episode, I’m talking to Alessandra Agrestini, the president of the jury at a new tasting competition, the Italian Grape Ale Beer Challenge, which took place near the end of 2021 in Turin, Italy. (Full disclosure: I served as one of the competition’s international judges.) Alessandra has been active in beer judging and beer education in Italy for quite a while — she and I first met at the Birra dell’Anno beer competition some 10 years ago.  In our conversation, we discuss beer-wine hybrids, the current Italian beer scene, and beer travel, as well as beer education, food and beer pairings, and Italian Pilsner. We also touch on the notion of styles, and wonder if it’s right to call all modern beer-wine hybrids “Italian” Grape Ales, regardless of where they are made. There is some justification for that claim: Italy probably produces more Grape Ales than any other country. The competition’s website has a map showing more than 220 Grape Ales from over 130 breweries in Italy. However, Italy wasn’t the first country to create modern beer-wine hybrids. Not all Grape Ales in Italy are produced in the same way, and there are wide variations in strength, color, flavor, aroma, acidity, and sweetness, which makes it hard to argue for Italian Grape Ale as a style unto itself.  If you’re interested in learning more, check out the website ItalianGrapeAle.org. The competition is open to entries from around the world, so if brewers you know make a great Grape Ale, Grape Lager, Oenobeer, or some other beer-wine hybrid, tell ’em to send it in this fall. And after this interview finishes, stick around for an update with the names of the competition winners.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)