A Step Ahead: Movement Activities to Help Develop Children’s Ability to Learn, Ed.D., David L.Biles M.A.
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Ed.D.,David L.Biles M.A.

A Step Ahead: Movement Activities to Help Develop Children’s Ability to Learn

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b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
If the inner ear is unable to function properly for balance, then the eyes must help, and this prevents the eyes from focusing on reading or writing and paying attention.
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b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
symptoms may be seen as an inability to sit still, squirming, fidgeting, and other symptoms that are similar to those of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. That is a sign that the child needs more creeping, crawling, spinning, hanging upside down, and other activities to stimulate the VA.
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b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
This movement also sends a message to the mid-brain, called the reticular activating system, otherwise known as the RAS, where the production of the neurotransmitter
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b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
The vestibular apparatus is the inner ear mechanism that is used for balance. It not only tells the brain when you’re upside down, sideways, leaning, sitting, or standing but also triggers the frontal lobe of the brain to produce acetylcholine
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b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
During rolling activities the child develops the muscles in the abdomen, hip flexors, shoulders, and arms. These muscles help with standing, sitting, and normal everyday movement.
b0044244847
b0044244847has quoted4 years ago
Time spent horizontally rolling, creeping, and crawling stimulates the vestibular apparatus (inner ear mechanism), triggering the frontal lobe of the brain to produce a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Acetylcholine helps with attention span, memory, and concentration.
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