29Bookshelves
0Impressions
10Quotes
29Bookshelves
0Impressions
10Quotes

Quotes from “The Republic” by Plato

zwemyatforlove
zwemyatforlovehas quoted5 years ago
Men cannot live by thought alone; the world of sense is always breaking in upon them.

nofe

zra
zrahas quoted2 years ago
but now that is gone, and life is no longer life.
stellasinaga
stellasinagahas quoted2 years ago
riches have the advantage of placing men above the temptation to dishonesty or falsehood
stellasinaga
stellasinagahas quoted2 years ago
justice is based on the idea of good, which is the harmony of the world, and is reflected both in the institutions of States and in motions of the heavenly bodies.
josuedr11
josuedr11has quoted2 years ago
What shall he profit, if his injustice be undetected and unpunished? He who is undetected only gets worse, whereas he who is detected and punished has the brutal part of his nature silenced and humanized; the gentler element in him is liberated, and his whole soul is perfected and ennobled by the acquirement of justice and temperance and wisdom, more than the body ever is by receiving gifts of beauty, strength and health, in proportion as the soul is more honourable than the body.
josuedr11
josuedr11has quoted2 years ago
There is another point which should be remarked.
What point?
Whether he has or has not a pleasure in learning; for no one will love that which gives him pain, and in which after much toil he makes little progress.
josuedr11
josuedr11has quoted2 years ago
And is not the love of learning the love of wisdom, which is philosophy?
Nina Skaletskaya
Nina Skaletskayahas quoted4 years ago
He is answered that justice does good to friends and harm to enemies. But in what way good or harm? 'In making alliances with the one, and going to war with the other.' Then in time of peace what is the good of justice? The answer is that justice is of use in contracts, and contracts are money partnerships. Yes; but how in such partnerships is the just man of more use than any other man? 'When you want to have money safely kept and not used.' Then justice will
Nina Skaletskaya
Nina Skaletskayahas quoted4 years ago
In the first book we have more of the real Socrates, such as he is depicted in the Memorabilia of Xenophon, in the earliest Dialogues of Plato, and in the Apology. He is ironical, provoking, questioning, the old enemy of the Sophists, ready to put on the mask of Silenus as well as to argue seriously. But in the sixth book his enmity towards the Sophists abates; he acknowledges that they are the representatives rather than the corrupters of the world. He also becomes more dogmatic and constructive, passing beyond the range either of the political or the speculative ideas of the real Socrates. In one passage Plato himself seems to intimate that the time had now come for Socrates, who had passed his whole life in philosophy, to give his own opinion and not to be always repeating the notions of other men. There is no evidence that either the idea of good or the conception of a perfect state were comprehended in the Socratic teaching, though he certainly dwelt on the nature of the universal and of final causes (cp. Xen. Mem.; Phaedo); and a deep thinker like him, in his thirty or forty years of public teaching, could hardly have failed to touch on the nature of family relations, for which there is also some positive evidence in the Memorabilia (Mem.) The Socratic method is nominally retained; and every inference is either put into the mouth of the respondent or represented as the common discovery of him and Socrates. But any one can see that this is a mere form, of which the affectation grows wearisome as the work advances. The method of enquiry has passe
Nina Skaletskaya
Nina Skaletskayahas quoted4 years ago
What is the meaning of the word justice? To tell the truth and pay your debts? No more than this? Or must we admit e
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)