Quotes from “Big Magic” by Elizabeth Gilbert

Mr. Destiny 9 and 14
Mr. Destiny 9 and 14has quoted2 years ago
Instead, I simply vowed to the universe that I would write forever, regardless of the result. I promised that I would try to be brave about it, and grateful, and as uncomplaining as I could possibly be. I also promised that I would never ask writing to take care of me financially, but that I would always take care of it—meaning that I would always support us both, by any means necessary. I did not ask for any external rewards for my devotion; I just wanted to spend my life as near to writing as possible—forever close to that source of all my curiosity and contentment—and so I was willing to make whatever arrangements needed to be made in order to get by.
natalyalitrovnik
natalyalitrovnikhas quoted2 years ago
Create whatever causes a revolution in your heart.
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
Never apologize for it, never explain it away, never be ashamed of it. You did your best with what you knew, and you worked with what you had, in the time that you were given. You were invited, and you showed up, and you simply cannot do more than that.
Anna Bashmakova
Anna Bashmakovahas quoted7 months ago
The work wants to be made, and it wants to be made through you.
Anna Bashmakova
Anna Bashmakovahas quoted7 months ago
My favorite refrigerator magnet: “I’ve suffered enough. When does my artwork improve?”
b2935330187
b2935330187has quotedlast year
I firmly believe that we all need to find something to do in our lives that stops us from eating the couch. Whether we make a profession out of it or not, we all need an activity that is beyond the mundane and that takes us out of our established and limiting roles in society (mother, employee, neighbor, brother, boss, etc.). We all need something that helps us to forget ourselves for a while—to momentarily forget our age, our gender, our socioeconomic background, our duties, our failures, and all that we have lost and screwed up.
SabirHasanli
SabirHasanlihas quotedlast year
You can measure your worth by your dedication to your path, not by your successes or failures.
SabirHasanli
SabirHasanlihas quotedlast year
Follow your curiosity. Ask questions. Sniff around. Remain open.
SabirHasanli
SabirHasanlihas quotedlast year
Living in this manner—continually and stubbornly bringing forth the jewels that are hidden within you—is a fine art, in and of itself.
Julie Grigorieva
Julie Grigorievahas quotedlast year
ou’re afraid you have no talent.
You’re afraid you’ll be rejected or criticized or ridiculed or misunderstood or—worst of all—ignored.
You’re afraid there’s no market for your creativity, and therefore no point in pursuing it.
You’re afraid somebody else already did it better.
You’re afraid everybody else already did it better.
You’re afraid somebody will steal your ideas, so it’s safer to keep them hidden forever in the dark.
You’re afraid you won’t be taken seriously.
You’re afraid your work isn’t politically, emotionally, or artistically important enough to change anyone’s life.
You’re afraid your dreams are embarrassing.
You’re afraid that someday you’ll look back on your creative endeavors as having been a giant waste of time, effort, and money.
You’re afraid you don’t have the right kind of discipline.
You’re afraid you don’t have the right kind of work space, or financial freedom, or empty hours in which to focus on invention or exploration.
You’re afraid you don’t have the right kind of training or degree.
You’re afraid you’re too fat. (I don’t know what this has to do with creativity, exactly, but experience has taught me that most of us are afraid we’re too fat, so let’s just put that on the anxiety list, for good measure.)
You’re afraid of being exposed as a hack, or a fool, or a dilettante, or a narcissist.
You’re afraid of upsetting your family with what you may reveal.
You’re afraid of what your peers and coworkers will say if you express your personal truth aloud.
You’re afraid of unleashing your innermost demons, and you really don’t want to encounter your innermost demons.
You’re afraid your best work is behind you.
You’re afraid you never had any best work to begin with.
You’re afraid you neglected your creativity for so long that now you can never get it back.
You’re afraid you’re too old to start.
You’re afraid you’re too young to start.
You’re afraid because something went well in your life once, so obviously nothing can ever go well again.
You’re afraid because nothing has ever gone well in your life, so why bother trying?
You’re afraid of being a one-hit wonder.
You’re afraid of being a no-hit wonder . . .
Listen, I don’t have all day here, so I’m not going to keep listing fears. It’s a bottomless list, anyhow, and a depressing one. I’ll just wrap up my summary this way: SCARY, SCARY, SCARY.
Everything is so goddamn scary.
Ingrid Belan
Ingrid Belanhas quoted2 years ago
have felt this phenomenon in my own life, whenever I start complaining. I have felt the way my self-pity slams the door on inspiration, making the room feel suddenly cold, small, and empty. That being the case, I took this path as a young person: I started telling myself that I enjoyed my work. I proclaimed that I enjoyed every single aspect of my creative endeavors—the agony and the ecstasy, the success and the failure, the joy and the embarrassment, the dry spells and the grind and the stumble and the confusion and the stupidity of it all.
natalyalitrovnik
natalyalitrovnikhas quoted2 years ago
because in the end, creativity is a gift to the creator, not just a gift to the audience
natalyalitrovnik
natalyalitrovnikhas quoted2 years ago
Bravery means doing something scary.
Fearlessness means not even understanding what the word scary means.
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
has taken me years to learn this, but it does seem to be the case that if I am not actively creating something, then I am probably actively destroying something (myself, a relationship, or my own peace of mind).
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
“My creative expression must be the most important thing in the world to me (if I am to live artistically), and it also must not matter at all (if I am to live sanely).”
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
Manson explains it this way: “If you want to be a professional artist, but you aren’t willing to see your work rejected hundreds, if not thousands, of times, then you’re done before you start. If you want to be a hotshot court lawyer, but can’t stand the eighty-hour workweeks, then I’ve got bad news for you.”
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
Because if you love and want something enough—whatever it is—then you don’t really mind eating the shit sandwich that comes with it.
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
So many of us believe in perfection, which ruins everything else, because the perfect is not only the enemy of the good; it’s also the enemy of the realistic, the possible, and the fun.”
Mark Ong
Mark Onghas quoted2 years ago
Perfectionism stops people from completing their work, yes—but even worse, it often stops people from beginning their work. Perfectionists often decide in advance that the end product is never going to be satisfactory, so they don’t even bother trying to be creative in the first place.
Sanet Krylich
Sanet Krylichhas quoted2 years ago
(Experience has taught me to be careful of meeting my heroes in person; it can be terribly disappointing.)
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