Aravind Adiga

The White Tiger

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WINNER OF THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2008
Balram Halwai is the White Tiger — the smartest boy in his village. His family is too poor for him to afford for him to finish school and he has to work in a teashop, breaking coals and wiping tables. But Balram gets his break when a rich man hires him as a chauffeur, and takes him to live in Delhi. The city is a revelation. As he drives his master to shopping malls and call centres, Balram becomes increasingly aware of immense wealth and opportunity all around him, while knowing that he will never be able to gain access to that world. As Balram broods over his situation, he realizes that there is only one way he can become part of this glamorous new India — by murdering his master.
The White Tiger presents a raw and unromanticised India, both thrilling and shocking — from the desperate, almost lawless villages along the Ganges, to the booming Wild South of Bangalore and its technology and outsourcing centres. The first-person confession of a murderer, The White Tiger is as compelling for its subject matter as for the voice of its narrator — amoral, cynical, unrepentant, yet deeply endearing.
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268 printed pages
Original publication
2008

Impressions

    brownsugar❤️shared an impression3 months ago
    🎯Worthwhile
    💞Loved Up
    🚀Unputdownable

    gerardinosshared an impression3 months ago
    👍Worth reading
    💡Learnt A Lot
    🎯Worthwhile
    🌴Beach Bag Book
    🚀Unputdownable
    😄LOLZ

    Shasha Setiyadishared an impression4 months ago
    👍Worth reading
    🎯Worthwhile

Quotes

    alla87662has quoted2 months ago
    towns that have the pollution and noise and traffic of a big city – without any hint of the true city’s sense of history, planning, and grandeur. Half-baked cities, built for half-baked men
    Shasha Setiyadihas quoted4 months ago
    Me, and thousands of others in this country like me, are half-baked, because we were never allowed to complete our schooling. Open our skulls, look in with a penlight, and you’ll find an odd museum of ideas: sentences of history or mathematics remembered from school textbooks (no boy remembers his schooling like one who was taken out of school, let me assure you), sentences about politics read in a newspaper while waiting for someone to come to an office,
    iamcatherainhas quoted4 months ago
    You can’t expect a man in a dung heap to smell sweet.

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