Books
Shintaro Ishihara

Season of Violence

Violent, sensual, and seemingly un-Japanese, the stories in Season of Violence nevertheless depict Japanese teenagers of the present in compulsive but often unconscious revolt against the moral codes of “old Japan.” Yet these stories tell of youth who offer no real, modern morality to replace the old—only the anti-morality of indiscriminate sex, brutality, and living for today's pleasures and sensations. These are stories of teenagers who came to be known as Taiyozoku— the Sun Tribe.Season of Violence won for its young author, Shintaro Ishihara, Japan's coveted Akutagawa Prize. Thus, Season of Violence is a good deal more than fast-moving, forcefully written fiction; it is vital social commentary on contemporary Japan which gives unexpected dimension to the traditional cardboard image of the Japanese student as somber, diligent, and obedient.Ishihara's stories of Japanese who were born in the ashes of war and defeat and raised in the fast-moving world of the postwar boom are stark accounts of a period when the values of the past have been discarded for misguided materialism and pleasure-seeking.
151 printed pages
Original publication
2004

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Quotes

    Corinahas quoted2 months ago
    The brutal side of his nature had reasserted itself.
    Corinahas quoted3 months ago
    He simply played like a child who feels compelled to damage his favorite toys until they are destroyed. And Eiko might easily have accepted the role of being a mere plaything.
    Corinahas quoted3 months ago
    Tatsuya regained the old sadistic feelings toward Eiko, and she found she had no power to repulse them. Tatsuya was no longer moved to excitement when they embraced in Eiko's room, and his sudden assaults often hurt her so much that she cried out in pain

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