The Four Noble Truths, His Holiness the Dalai Lama
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His Holiness the Dalai Lama

The Four Noble Truths

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Anna Petrescu
Anna Petrescuhas quotedlast year
two levels of compassion. At the first level, compassion is simulated. This is the initial stage, when you need to practise certain contemplations in order to generate compassion. As a result of this practice you reach the second level, at which compassion becomes natural and spontaneous. This is one of the ways of understanding the difference between relative and absolute compassion.
Vlad Tampiza
Vlad Tampizahas quoted2 years ago
Once you have achieved this first stage, you can proceed to the second stage and tackle the root cause – the fundamental ignorance of which we spoke earlier. At this stage you are able to counteract the forces of the kleshas directly. Once you can do that, the third stage consists not simply of gaining victory over them, but also of rooting out all the propensities and imprints they have left within the psyche. This is why Aryadeva states in the Four Hundred Verses on Madhyamaka that a true spiritual aspirant must first overcome negative behaviour, in the middle phase must counter any grasping at self, and in the final stage should overcome all the views that bind us within the samsaric realm
Vlad Tampiza
Vlad Tampizahas quoted2 years ago
We should not take pleasure in any negative action we have committed, but rather we should feel deep remorse and regret, and immediately afterwards we should purify the negativity, if possible. If we can do this, if we can live a way of life where we relate to our positive and negative actions in this way, then we will be able to follow the teachings on the law of karma much more effectively
Vlad Tampiza
Vlad Tampizahas quoted2 years ago
So, as we saw earlier, most of our conscious mind consists either of states related with objects that we have experienced in the past – recollections of past experiences inform our present consciousness – or it consists of some kind of feeling or sensation. As a result, it is very difficult for us to glimpse the actual nature of consciousness, which is the sheer state of knowing or the luminosity of mind. One technique that we can use in order to do this is sitting meditation, through which we free our mind from thoughts of past experiences and from any form of anticipation of the future. Instead, we abide in the nowness of the present, although we cannot really talk of a ‘present’ consciousness.
When you are able to clear away thoughts of the past and the future, slowly you begin to get a sense of the space between the two. You learn to abide in that present moment. In that space, you begin to glimpse what we call emptiness, and if you can remain in that emptiness for longer and longer periods of time then gradually the nature of consciousness itself, which is the sheer luminosity and natural awareness of mind, will slowly dawn in you. Through repeated practice this period can be lengthened more and more, so that your awareness of the nature of consciousness becomes clearer and clearer
Vlad Tampiza
Vlad Tampizahas quoted2 years ago
The first of the Four Noble Truths is the Truth of Suffering.
Vlad Tampiza
Vlad Tampizahas quoted2 years ago
When you analyse things by mentally breaking them down into their constitutive parts, you come to the understanding that it is simply in dependence upon other factors that anything comes into being. Therefore there is nothing that has any independent or intrinsic identity of its own. Whatever identity we give things is contingent on the interaction between our perception and reality itself. However, this is not to say that things do not exist. Buddhism is not nihilistic. Things do exist, but they do not have an independent, autonomous reality
Anna Petrescu
Anna Petrescuhas quoted2 years ago
all the major world religions have the potential to serve humanity and develop good human beings.
Shari Raji
Shari Rajihas quoted3 years ago
compassion, the altruistic mind, or our good heart
Shari Raji
Shari Rajihas quoted3 years ago
Non-violence essentially means that we should do our best to help others and, if this is not possible, should at the very least refrain from harming them.
Shari Raji
Shari Rajihas quoted3 years ago
The second principle is that of non-violence, which is the action taken by a Buddhist practitioner who has the view of the interdependent nature of reality.
Shari Raji
Shari Rajihas quoted3 years ago
The first of these is the interdependent nature of reality.
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