Quotes from “The Shortest History of Germany” by James Hawes

Yana Manukhina
Yana Manukhinahas quoted2 years ago
In 1745, all England trembled with fear as the Highland Scots invaded. No one thought them romantic. But once they’d been smashed at Culloden, the British Army almost immediately began using them as shock-troops, and the English public fell in love with tales of their unspoiled, natural bravado.
Denys Kuznietsov
Denys Kuznietsovhas quoted2 years ago
The state of Germany at the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 is difficult to describe except in biblical terms. Syria today might give us some idea. At least a third of the entire population seems to have perished, more in some areas. In 1631, Magdeburg on the Elbe, Otto the Great’s most-favoured city, had over 20,000 inhabitants; by 1649, it was 450, the rest having been mostly slaughtered in the streets. Even today, when German children sing their version of ‘Ladybird, Ladybird, Fly Away Home’, it’s not a house that’s on fire, but Pomerania.
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
The Great Slav Revolt of 983 AD is as central to Slavic history as 9 AD is to German history. It was the event which guaranteed cultural survival. Just as the Romans lost everything beyond the Rhine in 9 AD, the Germans were thrown clean back across the Elbe in 983 AD
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
On Christmas day, 800 AD, Charlemagne was crowned Roman Emperor
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
After thirty years of vicious fighting, several thousand executions and the threat (issued in 785 AD) that refusing baptism would henceforth be a capital crime, Charlemagne eventually managed what the Romans hadn’t, quelling, converting and ruling all the Germans up to the river Elbe
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
Charlemagne’s memory is so enduring because he was the bridge which finally ensured that the culture of Roman Europe was transported into the mediaeval world, and hence to us
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
to this day, in Slavic languages bordering Germany to the east, as well as in Hungarian, the very word for king comes from his name: Karl the Great, better known as Charlemagne
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
Islam, was advancing up through Spain and into France in the shape of the Ummayad Caliphate, but was stopped forever at the Battle of Tours
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
The decline and fall of Rome had more or less intersected with the rise of the Germans.

In 235 AD the various Germans had been illiterate barbarians trapped in Germany by Roman power. By Theodoric’s death in 526 AD, they were muscular Christians who controlled the entire former Western Empire
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
After 300 AD Germanic war-bands seem to have been driven by some irresistible force to shift their habitations, in what’s traditionally known as the Völkerwanderungen – the Migrations of the Peoples
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
We tend to think of civilised Rome going down at the hands of barbarian Germans, with the Dark Ages the sad result. But the lights were going out in Europe long before the Germans got to the switch
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
by c. 100 AD, despite the bloody setback of the Teutoburg Forest, Rome was in full control of the richest and most fertile parts of Germania
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
In 9 BC, Drusus reached the Elbe. There, according to the historians Cassius Dio and Suetonius, a vision of a gigantic female form advised him to turn back and cease his insatiable drive for conquests, for his days were numbered
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
Julius Caesar had invented the Germans
Ian Copple
Ian Copplehas quoted7 months ago
as far as we know, no one ever called anyone a German until 58 BC
asrover27
asrover27has quotedlast year
Saxons (Saxons is widely used in western Germany to mean all eastern Germans)
asrover27
asrover27has quotedlast year
Angela Merkel unilaterally voided
asrover27
asrover27has quotedlast year
Dublin Treaty of 1997 says that asylum-seekers to the EU must register, and therefore remain, in the first country they enter
asrover27
asrover27has quotedlast year
When Angela Merkel opened Germany’s borders to the refugees trapped in Budapest last September, she was at the zenith of her power
asrover27
asrover27has quotedlast year
price for her policies is not just the rise of a new right-wing populist party in Germany and a German society that is more divided and disgruntled than it has been in years. She has also created a Europe that is no longer united
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