Worth Books

Summary and Analysis of The Case Against Sugar

    IrenaWhohas quoted2 years ago
    Taubes takes the stance that even a little bit of sugar in our diets may be too much. Because sugar consumption has increased over the centuries, each subsequent generation may find it more difficult to undo the damage done.
    IrenaWhohas quoted2 years ago
    Sugar activates the same pleasure centers in our brains as cocaine and heroin, but because it doesn’t cause the type of destructive behavior seen in alcoholics and drug users, we haven’t sought to study it as a drug.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar—Your Brain’s Silent Killers
    by David Perlmutter
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Coca-Cola was found to have donated $1.5 million to the Global Energy Balance Network, an organization that advises Americans to get more exercise to lose weight and worry less about calorie counting
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    The idea that sugar may be addictive is also validated by the experience of alcoholics and drug addicts who have found quitting their addiction is easier when they eat sugary food in its place.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Studies in rats and monkeys have shown that even when they are addicted to cocaine, within two days they will choose sugar water over cocaine.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    our consumption of sugar over the centuries may have changed the species.”
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Sugar and slavery went hand in hand from the earliest times.”
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Sugar actually lights up the same center in the brain as nicotine, cocaine, heroin, and alcohol, and like other drugs, our bodies can become habituated to sugar and will require larger amounts to find satisfaction.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    He describes how beginning in childhood we see sugar as a reward for good behavior, a demonstration of parental love, and a feature in celebrations like birthday parties. But sugar may have more in common with illicit drugs than we realize
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Imagine a drug that can intoxicate us, can infuse us with energy, and can do so when taken by mouth. It doesn’t have to be injected, smoked, or snorted for us to experience its sublime and soothing effects. Imagine that it mixes well with virtually every food … and that when given to infants it provokes a feeling of pleasure so profound and intense that its pursuit becomes a driving force throughout their lives.”
    The “drug” Taubes references here is, of course, sugar.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    we are a sick population growing sicker despite advances in medical care.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    Because our palates are so attuned to sugar, it is included in nearly all processed foods, from lunchmeats and hot dogs to salad dressing and canned tomatoes.
    Юлия Даниловаhas quoted2 years ago
    As with drugs, we become habituated to sugar in that the more we consume, the more we feel we need it.
    b0921264949has quoted3 years ago
    Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It
    Mlle Mélancoliehas quoted3 years ago
    Our own sugar consumption can also affect the next generation, as evidenced by the Pima mothers who passed obesity and diabetes on their children.
    Svyatoslav Yushinhas quoted4 years ago
    “Sugar had become the currency of childhood.”
    Svyatoslav Yushinhas quoted4 years ago
    c. 8000 BC: Sugarcane is first domesticated in New Guinea.
    c. 500 BC: Farmers in India first refine sugar into the white crystalline form we know today.
    11th century: Crusaders return home from the Middle East and North Africa with sugar and introduce it to Europe.
    1493: Columbus brings sugar to the New World for the first time on his second voyage. The Caribbean proves to be the ideal climate for growing sugarcane—and there are plenty of slaves to work the fields.
    1775: Sugar now makes up almost one fifth of British imports—five times that of tobacco—and is a strong source of tax revenue.
    1898: Elliott Joslin, diabetes expert, first notes rising rates of diabetes in the United States. He blames this on fat consumption.
    1913: Frederick Allen proposes that sugar may be the cause of diabetes.
    1914: R. J. Reynolds introduces Camels, the first blended cigarettes with high sugar content.
    1934: Congress passes the Sugar Act, which protects the sugar industry through import quotas, production limits, and price control.
    1943: Sugar growers and refiners organize as the Sugar Research Foundation to counter growing evidence that sugar is detrimental to health.
    Svyatoslav Yushinhas quoted4 years ago
    The natural question that follows after reading Taubes’s book is: How much sugar is safe to eat? Just as it would be difficult and expensive to prove that sugar was explicitly responsible for Western diseases, there haven’t been studies showing how much sugar our bodies can safely tolerate. While some would argue that sugar in moderation is safe, Taubes believes that even small amounts of sugar may have long-term consequences. He compares it to tobacco use—we wouldn’t advocate smoking cigarettes in moderation, and we should be just as wary of sugar. The more sugar we consume, the more likely we are to become insulin-resistant, and therefore less able to process sugar without gaining weight, and more likely to develop diabetes. Our own sugar consumption can also affect the next generation, as evidenced by the Pima mothers who passed obesity and diabetes on their children.
    Svyatoslav Yushinhas quoted4 years ago
    In 1940, Arizona had the lowest rate of diabetes in the country, with only 755 cases total, 73 of them among Native Americans, such as the Pima, who lived on reservations. By the 1960s, 50% of Native American adults in Arizona were diabetic: the most shocking spike in diabetes in history. Isolated from the rest of the population for generations, the Pima began to integrate into mainstream American culture during World War II when some members of the tribe were drafted into the military and others began working in factories near Phoenix. Over the next few decades the diabetes rate skyrocketed along with obesity—in 1971 researchers noted that two-thirds of Pima men and over 90% of the women were considered overweight, if not obese.
    Taubes argues that because the Pima changed their diet so suddenly from sustenance farming to a sugar-rich Western diet, the population had little time to adapt, quickly becoming insulin-resistant.
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