Audre Lorde

A Burst of Light

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“The self-described black feminist lesbian mother poet used a mixture of prose, theory, poetry, and experience to interrogate oppressions and uplift marginalized communities. She was one of the first black feminists to target heteronormativity, and to encourage black feminists to expand their understanding of erotic pleasure. She amplified anti-oppression, even as breast cancer ravaged her ailing body.” — Evette Dionne, Bustle Magazine
Winner of the 1988 Before Columbus Foundation National Book Award, this path-breaking collection of essays is a clarion call to build communities that nurture our spirit. Lorde announces the need for a radical politics of intersectionality while struggling to maintain her own faith as she wages a battle against liver cancer. From reflections on her struggle with the disease to thoughts on lesbian sexuality and African-American identity in a straight white man's world, Lorde's voice remains enduringly relevant in today's political landscape.
Those who practice and encourage social justice activism frequently quote her exhortation, “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” In addition to the journal entries of “A Burst of Light: Living with Cancer,” this edition includes an interview, “Sadomasochism: Not About Condemnation,” and three essays, “I Am Your Sister: Black Women Organizing Across Sexualities,” “Apartheid U.S.A.,” and “Turning the Beat Around: Lesbian Parenting 1986,” as well as a new Foreword by Sonia Sanchez.
“When I don't know what to do, I turn to the Lorde.” — Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Bitch Media
This book is currently unavailable
139 printed pages
Original publication
2017

Impressions

    Lucero De La Fuenteshared an impressionlast year
    🔮Hidden Depths
    💡Learnt A Lot
    🎯Worthwhile

Quotes

    más o menos Perlahas quotedlast year
    It is today. Not yesterday. Hoy ha llegado—today has arrived. Sometimes I have gotten lost in this journey called today, where nothing moved, when I gathered up the country’s hysteria, when I looked at the world’s delirium, when I saw America try to disagree with its blood.
    Lucero De La Fuentehas quotedlast year
    I don’t see that as the point. I’m not questioning anyone’s right to live. I’m saying we must observe the implications of our lives. If what we are talking about is feminism, then the personal is political and we can subject everything in our lives to scrutiny. We have been nurtured in a sick, abnormal society, and we should be about the process of reclaiming ourselves as well as the terms of that society. This is complex. I speak not about condemnation but about recognizing what is happening and questioning what it means. I’m not willing to regiment anyone’s life, but if we are to scrutinize our human relationships, we must be willing to scrutinize all aspects of those relationships. The subject of revolution is ourselves, is our lives.
    Shari Rajihas quoted2 years ago
    we sometimes find it difficult to deal constructively with the genuine differences between us and to recognize that unity does not require that we be identical to each other.

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