en

David Herbert Lawrence

    b5888667540has quoted7 days ago
    The present book is a continuation from "Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious." The generality of readers had better just leave it alone. The generality of critics likewise. I really don't want to convince anybody. It is quite in opposition to my whole nature. I don't intend my books for the generality of readers. I count it a mistake of our mistaken democracy, that every man who can read print is allowed to believe that he can read all that is printed. I count it a misfortune that serious books are exposed in the public market, like slaves exposed naked for sale. But there we are, since we live in an age of mistaken democracy, we must go through with it.
    I warn the generality of readers, that this present book will seem to them only a rather more revolting mass of wordy nonsense than the last. I would warn the generality of
    b9315800885has quoted3 days ago
    half a loaf is better than no bread
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    bur­row­ing
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    Car­ston, Waite and Co.
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    Lord Palmer­ston form­ally opened the com­pany’s first mine at Spin­ney Park, on the edge of Sher­wood Forest.
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    Car­ston, Waite & Co. found they had struck on a good thing, so, down the val­leys of the brooks from Selby and Nut­tall, new mines were sunk, un­til soon there were six pits work­ing. From Nut­tall, high up on the sand­stone among the woods, the rail­way ran, past the ruined pri­ory of the Carthu­s­i­ans and past Robin Hood’s Well, down to Spin­ney Park, then on to Min­ton, a large mine among corn­fields; from Min­ton across the farm­lands of the val­ley­side to Bunker’s Hill, branch­ing off there, and run­ning north to Beg­gar­lee and Selby, that looks over at Crich and the hills of Derby­shire: six mines like black studs on the coun­tryside, linked by a loop of fine chain, the rail­way.
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    Mrs. Morel came of a good old burgher fam­ily, fam­ous in­de­pend­ents who had fought with Co­l­onel Hutchin­son, and who re­mained stout Con­greg­a­tion­al­ists
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    She was pur­itan, like her father, high-minded, and really stern.
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    in­can­des­cence
    Teddyhas quoted2 years ago
    tongue-wag­ger
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