en

Henry David Thoreau

    Настя Мозговаяhas quoted2 years ago
    I should not talk so much about my­self if there were any­body else whom I knew as well. Un­for­tu­nately, I am con­fined to this theme by the nar­row­ness of my ex­pe­ri­ence.
    Настя Мозговаяhas quotedlast year
    Why should they be­gin dig­ging their graves as soon as they are born?
    Yaroslav Pavlovhas quotedlast year
    I am sure that there is greater anxiety, commonly, to have fashionable, or at least clean and unpatched clothes, than to have a sound conscience.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    Most men, even in this com­par­a­tively free coun­try, through mere ig­no­rance and mis­take, are so oc­cu­pied with the fac­ti­tious cares and su­per­flu­ously coarse labors of life that its finer fruits can­not be plucked by them. Their fin­gers, from ex­ces­sive toil, are too clumsy and trem­ble too much for that. Ac­tu­ally, the la­bor­ing man has not leisure for a true in­tegrity day by day; he can­not af­ford to sus­tain the man­li­est re­la­tions to men; his la­bor would be de­pre­ci­ated in the mar­ket. He has no time to be any­thing but a ma­chine. How can he re­mem­ber well his ig­no­rance—which his growth re­quires—who has so of­ten to use his knowl­edge? We should feed and clothe him gra­tu­itously some­times, and re­cruit him with our cor­dials, be­fore we judge of him. The finest qual­i­ties of our na­ture, like the bloom on fruits, can be pre­served only by the most del­i­cate han­dling. Yet we do not treat our­selves nor one an­other thus ten­derly.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    The mass of men lead lives of quiet des­per­a­tion. What is called res­ig­na­tion is con­firmed des­per­a­tion. From the des­per­ate city you go into the des­per­ate coun­try, and have to con­sole your­self with the brav­ery of minks and muskrats. A stereo­typed but un­con­scious de­spair is con­cealed even un­der what are called the games and amuse­ments of mankind. There is no play in them, for this comes af­ter work. But it is a char­ac­ter­is­tic of wis­dom not to do des­per­ate things.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    Prac­ti­cally, the old have no very im­por­tant ad­vice to give the young, their own ex­pe­ri­ence has been so par­tial, and their lives have been such mis­er­able fail­ures, for pri­vate rea­sons, as they must be­lieve; and it may be that they have some faith left which be­lies that ex­pe­ri­ence, and they are only less young than they were. I have lived some thirty years on this planet, and I have yet to hear the first syl­la­ble of valu­able or even earnest ad­vice from my se­niors.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    In the large towns and cities, where civ­i­liza­tion es­pe­cially pre­vails, the num­ber of those who own a shel­ter is a very small frac­tion of the whole. The rest pay an an­nual tax for this out­side gar­ment of all, be­come in­dis­pens­able sum­mer and win­ter, which would buy a vil­lage of In­dian wig­wams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    Our in­ven­tions are wont to be pretty toys, which dis­tract our at­ten­tion from se­ri­ous things. They are but im­proved means to an unim­proved end, an end which it was al­ready but too easy to ar­rive at; as rail­roads lead to Bos­ton or New York. We are in great haste to con­struct a mag­netic tele­graph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have noth­ing im­por­tant to com­mu­ni­cate.
    Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted2 years ago
    Our in­ven­tions are wont to be pretty toys, which dis­tract our at­ten­tion from se­ri­ous things. They are but im­proved means to an unim­proved end, an end which it was al­ready but too easy to ar­rive at; as rail­roads lead to Bos­ton or New York. We are in great haste to con­struct a mag­netic tele­graph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have noth­ing im­por­tant to com­mu­ni­cate.
    Liamhas quoted2 years ago
    Public opin­ion is a weak tyrant com­pared with our own pri­vate opin­ion. What a man thinks of him­self, that it is which de­ter­mines, or rather in­di­cates, his fate
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