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Niccolò Machiavelli

    b8599290442has quoted2 years ago
    For if anyone in a naked state should thrash upon the sand under the highest sun, or upon the snow in the most icy months of winter, as did Diogenes, he would be considered mad
    Artem Kostryukovhas quotedlast year
    For in­jur­ies ought to be done all at one time, so that, be­ing tasted less, they of­fend less; be­ne­fits ought to be given little by little, so that the fla­vour of them may last longer.
    Artem Kostryukovhas quotedlast year
    The chief found­a­tions of all states, new as well as old or com­pos­ite, are good laws and good arms; and as there can­not be good laws where the state is not well armed, it fol­lows that where they are well armed they have good laws.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    and to hold them se­curely it is enough to have des­troyed the fam­ily of the prince who was rul­ing them;
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    He who has an­nexed them, if he wishes to hold them, has only to bear in mind two con­sid­er­a­tions: the one, that the fam­ily of their former lord is ex­tin­guished; the other, that neither their laws nor their taxes are altered, so that in a very short time they will be­come en­tirely one body with the old prin­cip­al­ity.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    But when states are ac­quired in a coun­try dif­fer­ing in lan­guage, cus­toms, or laws, there are dif­fi­culties, and good for­tune and great en­ergy are needed to hold them, and one of the greatest and most real helps would be that he who has ac­quired them should go and reside there.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    Be­cause, if one is on the spot, dis­orders are seen as they spring up, and one can quickly rem­edy them; but if one is not at hand, they are heard of only when they are great, and then one can no longer rem­edy them.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    Besides this, the coun­try is not pil­laged by your of­fi­cials; the sub­jects are sat­is­fied by prompt re­course to the prince; thus, wish­ing to be good, they have more cause to love him, and wish­ing to be oth­er­wise, to fear him.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    The other and bet­ter course is to send colon­ies to one or two places, which may be as keys to that state, for it is ne­ces­sary either to do this or else to keep there a great num­ber of cav­alry and in­fantry.
    feradwighthas quoted4 months ago
    Again, the prince who holds a coun­try dif­fer­ing in the above re­spects ought to make him­self the head and de­fender of his less power­ful neigh­bours, and to weaken the more power­ful amongst them, tak­ing care that no for­eigner as power­ful as him­self shall, by any ac­ci­dent, get a foot­ing there;
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