Pen & Sword History

    ellatanevahas quoted8 months ago
    Of course many wounded people never survived to get help. Innumerable Khmer stepped on mines and if not killed instantly died soon after. The bodies were never found. I heard of a Buddhist monk wounded by a mine who, carried by his friends, had almost made it to the hospital. They had stopped in the first village across the border and asked for medical help in the village shop. The shop had somehow got hold of a bottle of an intravenous plasma expander – a blood substitute – and sold it to them. These solutions have a short lifespan and must be absolutely sterile. This bottle was months old and instead of being almost colourless had become green with bacteria. It must have been similar to the green scum on ditchwater. The friends injected this into the monk who was dead within four hours
    ellatanevahas quoted8 months ago
    Sometimes there was a happier outcome. One evening an ambulance rushed in with a seven-year-old girl. She came from a village in the north, right on the border and had been playing in front of her house when there had suddenly been some cross-border shooting. The little girl had been shot in the head and was deeply unconscious. There is realistically almost no hope at all here for someone with a bullet in the brain and we assumed she would die very soon. But we put her on a table in the emergency room and took
    ellatanevahas quoted8 months ago
    X-ray of her head. The bullet was not where we thought it was. It hadn’t even penetrated the skull but had gone through the scalp at a sharp angle, ricocheted along the bone and was lying just under the skin further back. As we looked in amazement at the picture, the girl suddenly woke up, saw some strange-looking Europeans staring at her, jumped off the table and ran off into the courtyard screaming. We eventually persuaded her to come back and have the bullet removed. She kept it as a souvenir. A very lucky girl
    ellatanevahas quoted8 months ago
    As I was watching them in our workshop in Quetta, I noticed there was a subtle difference from the Cambodian models – it was in the knee joint. Instead of bending to 90 degrees, these bent double to almost 180 degrees. I asked the technician the reason. He said that ICRC had adapted them for a Muslim country. It meant that when the wearer went to mosque he could kneel down to pray like all the others. I was impressed by that
    Mustafahas quoted2 years ago
    Thomas Bull, in his ‘Hints to Mothers’ (1854), estimated that three-quarters of all deaths from opiate decoctions occurred in children under five years.
    Mustafahas quotedlast year
    It was not just straightforward adulteration of tea leaves that was the problem, it was also the production of counterfeit tea, called ‘smouch’, sometimes referred to as ‘English Tea’.
    b9000542659has quotedlast year
    Eden, which left him responsible for managing the day-to-day government business
    b9000542659has quotedlast year
    being provided – would seemingly leave the US with no choice but
    b9000542659has quoted8 months ago
    brought [to Churchill] a measure of ease to his frustrated spirit.’

    Eden’s escape was literature. He read voraciously, and was particularly
    b9000542659has quoted8 months ago
    commanders and political leaders faced significant risks when flying
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