Atlantic Books

Atlantic
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Independent British publisher of literary fiction and non-fiction.
    Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books9 days ago
    The Weight of Numbers describes the metamorphosis of three people: Anthony Burden, a mathematical genius destroyed by the beauty of numbers; Saul Cogan, transformed from prankster idealist to trafficker in the poor and dispossessed; and Stacey Chavez, ex-teenage celebrity and mediocre performance artist, hungry for fame and starved of love. All are haunted by Nick Jinks, a malevolent curse of a man who seems to be everywhere at once. As a grid of connections emerge between a dusty philosophical society in London and an African revolution, between international container shipping and celebrity-hosted exposés on the problems of the Third World—this novel sends the specters of the Baby Boom’s liberal revolutions floating into the unreal estate of globalization and media overload—with a deadly payoff.The Weight of Numbers is an artful and deadly novel that traces the secret histories and paranoid fantasies of our culture into a future globalized in ways both liberating and hideous, full of information and empty of meaning. Simon Ings has delivered a storytelling tour de force that will alter some of your most cherished beliefs.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books9 days ago
    In 1976 Buenos Aires, a ten-year-old boy lives in a world of school lessons and comic books, TV shows and games of Risk—a world in which men have superpowers and boys can conquer the globe on a rectangle of cardboard. But in his hometown, the military has just seized power, and amid a climate of increasing terror and intimidation, people begin to disappear without a trace.When his mother unexpectedly pulls him and his younger brother from school, she tells him they’re going on an impromptu family trip. But he soon realizes that this will be no ordinary holiday: his parents are known supporters of the opposition, and they are going into hiding. Holed up in a safe house in the remote hills outside the city, the family assumes new identities. The boy names himself Harry after his hero Houdini, and as tensions rise and the uncertain world around him descends into chaos, he spends his days of exile learning the secrets of escape.Kamchatka is the portrait of a child forced to square fantasy with a reality in which family, politics, history, and even time itself have become more improbable than any fiction. Told from the points of view of Harry as a grown man and as a boy, Kamchatka is an unforgettable story of courage and sacrifice, the tricks of time and memory, and the fragile yet resilient fabric of childhood.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books11 days ago
    A SUNDAY TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR'This feels like a vision for the 21st-century novel… It made me happy' Ocean Vuong, author of On Earth We're Briefly GorgeousBenson and Mike are two young guys who have been together for a few years — good years — but now they're not sure why they're still a couple. There's the sex, sure, and the meals Mike cooks for Benson, and, well, they love each other. But when Mike finds out his estranged father is dying in Osaka just as his acerbic Japanese mother, Mitsuko, arrives for a visit, Mike picks up and flies across the world to say goodbye. In Japan he undergoes an extraordinary transformation, discovering the truth about his family and his past, while back home, Mitsuko and Benson are stuck living together as unconventional roommates, an absurd domestic situation that ends up meaning more to each of them than they ever could have predicted…Funny and profound, Memorial is about family in all its strange forms, becoming who you're supposed to be and the outer limits of love.NAMED A BOOK TO WATCH IN 2021 BY:SUNDAY TIMES | THE TIMES | DAILY MAIL | THE TELEGRAPH | RADIO 4 | IRISH TIMES
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books4 months ago
    This “absorbing” murder mystery “vividly illustrates daily Palestinian life” (Publishers Weekly).A member of the tiny but ancient Samaritan community has been murdered. The dead man controlled hundreds of millions of dollars of government money. And if the World Bank cannot locate it within the next several days, all aid money to the Palestinians will be cut off.Visiting Nablus, history teacher-turned-sleuth Omar Yussef must solve the murder and find the money, or all of his community will suffer . . .“Yussef, ever the historian, jumps at the chance to visit the Samaritan synagogue and learn more about their beliefs, but he is quickly engulfed in a murder investigation . . . As in The Collaborator of Bethlehem and A Grave in Gaza, Rees not only offers a perceptive look at complex international political issues but also helps us to understand those issues in the context of everyday lives—of Palestinians attempting to dodge bullets coming in all directions (from Israelis but also from rival factions within their own country) and carry on with the business of falling in love, marrying, raising children.”—Booklist, starred review
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books4 months ago
    Hugh “Bulldog” Drummond is a British fictional character, created by H. C. McNeile and published under his pen name “Sapper”. Following McNeile's death in 1937, the novels were continued by Gerard Fairlie and later Henry Reymond. After an unsuccessful one-off appearance as a policeman in The Strand Magazine, the character was reworked by McNeile into a gentleman adventurer for his 1920 novel Bulldog Drummond. McNeile went on to write ten Drummond novels, four short stories, four stage plays and a screenplay before his death in 1937. The stories were continued by his friend Gerard Fairlie between 1938 and 1954; further books were published in the 1960s and one in 1983. Drummond is a First World War veteran, brutalised by his experiences in the trenches and bored with his post-war lifestyle. He publishes an advertisement looking for adventure, and soon finds himself embroiled in a series of exploits, many of which involve Carl Peterson—who becomes his nemesis—and Peterson's mistress, the femme fatale Irma. After his first adventure Drummond marries his client, Phyllis Benton; in later episodes she becomes involved in Drummond's exploits, often as the victim of kidnapping by Drummond's enemies. In 1921 an adaptation of the first novel was staged in London, with Gerald du Maurier playing the role of Drummond; the play was further adapted and resulted in the 1922 silent film Bulldog Drummond, with Carlyle Blackwell in the lead role. Several other Drummond films have followed, either based on McNeile's stories or with unique storylines.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books4 months ago
    “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been claimed as the first detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his “tales of ratiocination”.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books4 months ago
    The Riddle of the Sands is one of the earliest examples of the spy novel genre, and became hugely popular shortly after its publication. Childers carefully interweaves fiction with real-world places, events, and politics, making for an extremely convincing story of invasion—so convincing that some (perhaps erroneously) credit the novel with spurring the creation of new English naval bases. The framing device, where Childers pretends to be an editor presenting a factual account, only adds to the believability of the story.
    The novel begins with Carruthers, an official in the Foreign Office, accepting an invitation from his friend Davies for what he assumes is a pleasure trip on a sailboat in the Baltic sea. As the two embark on their journey, it quickly becomes apparent that not everything is at it seems on the German coast.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books4 months ago
    A Palestinian travels to New York—where he must defend his own son against a murder charge—in this “excellent” mystery (Publishers Weekly, starred review).
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Bookslast year
    Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us as never before.Traditionally, World War II has been understood in a straightforward way but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, battles, bombs and bravery all have a fascinating history… but so too do handkerchiefs, furniture, Mozart, insects, blood, mothers, suicide, darkness, cancer and puppets!Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Bookslast year
    Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us as never before.Traditionally, the Vikings have been understood in a straightforward way — but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, ships, raiding and trade have a fascinating history… but so too do hair, break-ins, toys, teeth, mischief, luck and silk!Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Bookslast year
    Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us as never before.Traditionally, the Tudors have been understood in a straightforward way but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, Tudor monarchs, exploration and religion have a fascinating history… but so too does cannibalism, shrinking, bells, hats, mirrors, monsters, faces, letter-writing and accidents!Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Bookslast year
    Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the world around us as never before.Traditionally, the Romans have been understood in a straightforward way but the period really comes alive if you take an unexpected approach to its history. Yes, emperors, the development of civilisation and armies all have a fascinating history… but so too do tattoos, collecting, fattening, recycling, walking, poison, fish, inkwells and wicked stepmothers!Each of these subjects is equally fascinating in its own right, and each sheds new light on the traditional subjects and themes that we think we know so well.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Bookslast year
    From the Irish bestselling author of Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan comes a short story about modern love, old-fashioned values and a new-born calf.____________________________While the country gears up for a referendum, a man sits waiting with a ring in his pocket…He has known his girlfriend since they were children, though they have become quite different adults. He lives in the city, she works on a farm. She's voting YES, he doesn't know what he's doing; what exactly it is he believes.But he does know that he makes her laugh and that their connection feels natural, most of the time. So surely there's a decent chance she will say YES to him too?
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books2 years ago
    There are only five other black girls in our class of twenty-six…________________________From the author of the critically-acclaimed House of Stone, listed for the Folio Prize, is a short story about growing up in Zimbabwe ________________________A country school girl attends the prestigious Girls' College in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and she learns how to be English. She learns pronunciations, learns to pour, sip, and hold tea, and even learns to laugh the English way— Hahaha!…Hahaha… Haaaaa haaaaa haaaa…But things begin to change for the pupils of Girls' College when Zimbabwe's new president calls for 'A' grade schools to enrol more black pupils.
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books2 years ago
    From the Miles Franklin longlisted author of Flames, is a short story that will have you on the edge of your seat, screaming 'wake up'.___________________The mum and the dad are in bed but the boy is standing in the hallway. He's been sleepwalking again.The boy wakes up in the middle of the night to find a man in his hallway. But this is no regular man. No, he's a hall chimp. The man jumps around like a chimp, scratched his armpits like a chimp, rolls around on the floor like a chimp. The boy wants to play too…
  • Atlanticadded a book to the bookshelfAtlantic Books2 years ago
    From the critically acclaimed author of Oliver Loving and The Story of Forgetting is a short story about friendship, loss and growing up.______________________Life lesson: the most soothing salve available to the man who has recently torched his own face is a regular application of wickedness with a pretty girl.The choices we make can follow us, and when half of your face is torched you can't escape the past. As a freshman in college he meets friends and attends parties, red cup in tow. His face is a Rorschach test to his friends, though he'll never tell them what really happened.In his group of friends there is Ava— sardonic, infatuating and alarmingly beautiful Ava. But he's too burnt up to be considered as anything more than a 'bestie' to a girl like her…
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