Mountaineers Books

Mountaineers Books
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Leading readers to the lessons and pleasures of the great outdoors.
    Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books3 years ago

    * Mountaineering guidelines for people going to altitude (heights above 7,000 feet) with pre-existing health conditions such as heart conditions, diabetes, and cancer
    * A handy glossary and easy-to-read tables covering symptoms and signs, altitude illness, and high altitude drugs
    * Case studies of real situations and a question-and-answer section help readers better understand general issues about altitude and its effects, and more
    This edition of  Altitude Illnessprovides the latest information on prevention and treatment of altitude illness — from preparing for altitude to recognizing and treating the symptoms of acute mountain sickness, including high altitude pulmonary and cerebral edemas. Suited for both novice and seasoned hikers, climbers, trekkers, and skiers, Altitude Illness, 2nd Ed., also includes an updated examination of how altitude interacts with certain drugs, a new section on using the web to find more information about altitude illness, and much more.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    “A lovely mix of recollections coupled with erudite reflections of an at-times almost too-openly-honest elder.” — Tom Hornbein, author of Everest: The West Ridge
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    On the morning of 2 June 1953, the day of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation, the first news broke that Everest had finally been conquered. Drawing on first-hand interviews and unprecedented access to archives, this is a ground-breaking new account of that extraordinary first ascent. Revealing that what has gone down in history as a supremely well-planned expedition was actually beset by crisis and controversy, Everest 1953 recounts a bygone age of self-sacrifice and heroism, using letters and personal diaries to reveal the immense stress and heartache the climbers often hid from their fellow team members. Charting how the ascent affected the original team ­in subsequent years and detailing its immense cultural impact today, Everest 1953 is the perfect book to commemorate this remarkable feat of the human will.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    * The author reveals the demons that drove her to extreme physical accomplishments at the cost of great suffering story of adventure and personal growth* Pasaban is one of the best high-altitude climbers in the world todaybr>
    On May 17, 2010, a 37-year-old Spaniard named Edurne Pasaban became the first woman to climb all fourteen peaks higher than 8,000 meters. This record-breaking accomplishment put the Basque woman on National Geographic’s 2010 “Adventurers of the Year” list. The next year, both The Alpinist and Outside magazines placed her on their “Adventurers of the Year” lists, too.Pasaban’s accomplishment did not come without controversy: Another woman, Korean climber Oh Eun-Sun, claimed to have completed the peaks a few weeks earlier. Later inquiries revealed that Oh Eun-Sun had failed to summit Kangchenjunga in 2009 and her claim was eventually withdrawn, leaving Edurne as the clear victor. But how did she get there?Published for the first time in English, Tilting at Mountains tells Edurne’s heartfelt and deeply personal story. She details not only how she came to climb the 8,000-meter peaks——the competitive nature of her Basque heritage played a role, as did, admittedly, an interest in handsome climbing guides——but also how her love for the mountains pulled her from a deep, soul-crushing depression. The book covers her climbs on all the 8,000-meter peaks, some of which were almost cakewalks while others were climbed at great cost, including the loss of close friends.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    • One of the greatest explorers of the 20th century• Shipton’s Everest explorations set the stage for its conquest by Edmund HillaryEric Shipton was an adventurer when adventure meant traveling to places for which no maps existed, scaling mountains whose heights were uncalculated, and encountering people whom no westerner had ever met. That Untravelled World, originally published in 1969, is his autobiography, written near the end of his career, when the passing of time had deepened his reflections on his many accomplishments and companions. Shipton’s story begins with his early childhood, his first climbs in the Alps, his decision to be a coffee farmer rather than attend university, and his early climbs in Africa. He recounts his introduction to Bill Tilman, through a letter Tilman sent asking for advice about climbing Mount Kenya. This introduction lead to one of the most famous climbing partnerships in history—as bonded in pursuit of adventure as Holmes and Moriarty were in solving crimes. In 1951 Shipton led an expedition to explore the south side of Everest. His small party of four (plus Sherpas) explored Everest’s Western Cwm to determine if the South Col could be climbed from there. In 1952, unable to get a permit to climb Everest, Shipton and his team climbed “eleven mountains between 21,000 and 23,000 feet, and a number of smaller peaks.” Shipton was expected to be named the leader of the momentous 1953 British Everest expedition but, surprisingly, John Hunt was chosen instead. Of the slight, Shipton wrote, “I had often deplored the exaggerated publicity accorded to Everest expeditions and the consequent distortion of values. Yet, when it came to the point, I was far from pleased to withdraw from this despised limelight; nor could I fool myself that it was only the manner of my rejection that I minded.” So disappointed was Shipton in being overlooked to lead the Everest summit expedition that he left Britain for South America. He never again returned to the Himalaya yet, as this book reveals, his adventures were far from over.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    Frank Smythe's mountaineering achievements in the decade before the Second World War became a part of climbing history. His intensive Alpine climbing, followed by two Himalayan expeditions — to Kangchenjunga in 1930 and success the following year on Kamet, the highest summit then reached — became the prelude to Everest. And in 1933 on that great mountain, climbing alone and without supplementary oxygen he got to within 820 feet of the top, a record height before efforts were resumed post-war and Everest was climbed in 1953. And as a superb Himalayan finale, in 1937 he returned to the Indian Garhwal to climb difficult peaks up to 24,000 feet in a rapid lightweight style. The expeditions were central to his lifetime's work as a writer and photographer — 27 books and albums, together with numberless newspaper and magazine articles, intensive lecturing, radio broadcasts and a film. It was an output that made him a celebrity, a rare feat in the days before television and the internet. He had tens of thousands of readers and his name was familiar to perhaps millions of the general public. It was an incredible career, especially since he died at the early age of 48 after a serious illness in India. Frank Smythe was resolute in keeping his home life private, and few details of it emerged in his writings. It was a turbulent life, even from earliest childhood, and remained so, with ambition and impatience almost overwhelming him at times, and eventually this volatile mix, apart from alienating some more traditional members of the Alpine Club, would lead to the break-up of his marriage. Yet when he was among hills he became tranquil and inspired. Some fifty years after his death in 1949 one of his three sons, Tony, decided to write a full account of his father's life, an extraordinary story he believed was important historically and well worth telling. This book is the result. 'This book is timely, well researched and written with the authority of a committed climber. The reader will be watching to see just how objective Frank's son will be and I can only compliment Tony Smythe on dealing with all the major events in his father's life in the most even-handed way. I found the quarrel between Smythe and Graham Brown one of the most interesting sections of the book for Tony's description of the climbing is riveting and his analysis of the disagreements masterful. The reader is left gripped … The book does not lack humour either, and I found myself smiling, sometimes laughing out loud.' Doug Scott 'Frank could obviously be an awkward bloke, but I'm growing fond of him! Hugely impressed, a huge piece of work and very well written.' Steve Dean 'Just received the second part of your magnificent book — it makes fine reading … All those years of incredible research with interesting findings have paid off … I was amazed about the number of accidents and illnesses he suffered in his short life.' Richard Smythe (brother)
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    CLICK HERE to download a sample from Sherpa
    • Ang Tharkay was the sirdar for Maurice Herzog’s Annapurna expedition in 1950—the first 8000-meter peak to be climbed
    • Ang Tharkay was a key member of the 1951 reconnaissance of Everest—which led to the successful 1953 ascentSherpas have recently been in the public eye, in part because of the 2013 Everest “brawl,” the 2014 avalanche that took the lives of thirteen climbing Sherpas, and the 2015 earthquake that devastated Nepal. These events and others have led to much public discussion about how Sherpas today are treated and viewed by their Western employers. Sherpa expands our understanding of these issues by providing historical context.
    The autobiography of Ang Tharkay, who was born in 1908 and became one of the most renowned Sherpas of early Himalayan exploration, has long been a collector’s item in the original French-language edition but it has never been available in English until now.
    In Sherpa, Tharkay describes his experiences traveling with Eric Shipton and H.W. Tilman and as the sirdar (head Sherpa) on Maurice Herzog’s 1950 ascent of Annapurna. Few such Sherpa accounts have been written, and fewer still from these early Himalayan expeditions. Opening with a brief account of Tharkay’s childhood and background, Sherpa then immerses readers in expeditions on Everest, Nanga Parbat, and, of course, Annapurna. Tharkay reveals some of the politics within the Sherpa support teams: petty arguments and shared struggles that went unnoticed or at least unrecorded by those who hired them. Tharkay’s admiration of his employers is leavened with his recognition of their shortcomings, but his affection for the climbers who employed him, and theirs for him, radiates throughout the story.
    Sherpa includes an original foreword by Tashi Sherpa, founder of Sherpa Adventure Gear and the nephew of Ang Tharkay. He remembers how he and his young cousins worshipped “Agu” (Uncle) as a respected mountaineer and hero, a warm and safe presence for the family.

    This title is part of our LEGENDS AND LORE series. Click here > to learn more.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    •The classic story of a notorious climb, now revised, updated, and expanded by the original author with new information •Literally a race to ascend Europe’s most formidable mountain wall—Brits and Americans versus GermansThe North Face of the Eiger was long renowned as the most dangerous climb in the Swiss Alps, one that had cost the lives of numerous skilled mountaineers. In February 1966, two teams—one German, the other British/American—aimed to climb it in a straight line from bottom to top. Astonishingly, the two teams knew almost nothing about each other's attempt until both arrived at the foot of the face. The race was on.The Anglo-American team of John Harlin, Layton Kor, and Dougal Haston intended to make a dash to the summit when conditions were right. The Germans, with an eight-man team and a mass of equipment, planned a slow, relentless ascent. Watching all was a young journalist, Peter Gillman. Now, fifty years later, Gillman recalls the dramatic events on the North Face, and assesses their effect on those who took part. The charismatic and controversial American climber John Harlin was killed before the summit was reached, while others were permanently injured through frostbite. For British photographer Chris Bonington, who was sucked into the action, it opened a path to a career and reputation as Britain's foremost mountaineer. “It was incredibly challenging and probably some of the hardest climbing done in the Alps to that time,” remembers Bonington. “Being involved was absolutely fantastic. There’s never been anything like it for me, before or since.”
    This title is part of our LEGENDS AND LORE series. Click here > to learn more.
  • Mountaineers Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMountaineers Books2 years ago
    • Loretan is often credited with bringing fast-and-light style to the highest mountains• New foreword by bestselling writer David RobertsOn October 5, 1995, Erhard Loretan became the third person to climb all fourteen 8000-meter peaks, and the second to climb them without supplemental oxygen. He also became one of only a handful of individuals to climb Everest via the Hornbein Couloir; he and Jean Troillet completed the roundtrip climb in only 43 hours.
    An influential climber, Loretan’s story has never before been told in English. He writes with humor, often deprecating his own accomplishments, and he is shockingly honest: On Cho Oyu, for instance, his climbing partner, Pierre-Alain Steiner, fell hundreds of meters. Loretan called out to what he assumed would be a corpse. Unexpectedly, Steiner called back. Loretan writes, knowing that what he is about to share is terrible, that he felt no joy on hearing his friend’s voice because rescue was impossible in so remote a place.

    This title is part of our LEGENDS AND LORE series. Click here > to learn more.
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