Pushkin Press

Pushkin Press
Pushkin Press
229Books

One fee. Stacks of books

You don’t just buy a book, you buy an entire library… for the same price!

Always have something to read

Friends, editors, and experts can help you find new and interesting books.

Read whenever, wherever

Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Publishing the best writing from around the world – great stories to be read and read again.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press14 days ago
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press21 days ago
Two brilliant, multi-layered stories from the winner of the Kenzaburo Oe Prize: part of our Japanese novella series, showcasing the best contemporary Japanese writingIn two stunning tales by novelist-playwright Toshiki Okada, characters stagger and thrash, bound by a generational hunger for human connection. On the eve of the Iraq War a couple find unexpected deliverance —  fleeting and anonymous — at a love hotel. And wheels spin as a woman aches for something more from her husband, even as she knows she has enough.Snapshots of moments high and low, these stories introduce us to an unsettlingly honest voice in contemporary Japanese fiction.Toshiki Okada is a hugely admired playwright, director and novelist. Born in Yokohama in 1973, he formed the theatre company “chelfitsch” in 1997. Since then he has written and directed all of the company's productions, practising a distinctive methodology for creating plays, and has come to be known for his use of hyper-colloquial Japanese and unique choreography. His play Five Days in March, on which the first story in The End of the Moment We Had is based, won the prestigious Kishida Drama Award. His works have been translated into many languages around the world.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press21 days ago
A delightful and essential compendium of words, new, old or abused through Brexit.BLUNDER.To mistake grossly, to err very widely.'Someone had blundered' (Alfred, Lord Tennyson, 'Charge of the Brexit Brigade')EUTHANASIA. An easy death. Strangulation by EU regulations, according to Brexiteers.'Brexit' seems to mean many things, but none of them is clear. Fortunately, help is at hand from Harry Eyres and George Myerson, who offer us pithy and incisive definitions of the key terms associated with this momentous process.From 'COCK-UP' to 'WRETCHED' via 'BUFFOON' and 'MAY', Johnson's Brexit Dictionary is a delightful, witty and essential compendium inspired by Dr Johnson's original, and updated for our turbulent times.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press2 months ago
HOTEL SILENCE won the Icelandic Literature Prize (the equivalent of our National Book Award) and the Booksellers Prize.BUTTERFLIES IN NOVEMBER won the Tómas Gudmundsson Literary Award and was longlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. It was named a best book of the year by the Financial Times and Independent, and it was widely reviewed in the New York Times, Boston Globe, New Yorker, O Magazine, New York Magazine, and Minneapolis Star Tribune.Her writing has been translated widely into twenty-two languages. HOTEL SILENCE will be published internationally in seven countries to-date: France, Italy, Sweden, England, Hungary, Norway, and Iceland.For readers of: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, The 100-Year-Old-Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson, Rachel Joyce’s The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, and Gabrielle Zevin’s The Storied Life of AJ Fikry.In the tradition of widowers who go on epic adventures, curmudgeonly misunderstood men who find love in unexpected places, and little old ladies who commit white collar crimes for a better quality of late life, comes a new loveable, floundering protagonist in the midst of a mid-life crisis who wants to forego it all but can’t seem to even get that right.Olafsdottir’s English debut novel The Greenhouse (AmazonCrossing), sold over 100,000 ebooks; it won the DV Cultural Prize for literature and was nominated for the Nordic Council Prize, the Prix Femina, and Prix FNAC.Olafsdottir is a masterful writer in that she brings both humor and lightheartedness as well as incredible complexity and insight to her work. Depicts in intimate detail the difficulty of rebuilding a small town in an unnamed war-torn region. It is a deeply-felt portrait of human suffering and courage.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press3 months ago
The unforgettable story of one woman's struggle to survive persecution in wartime France‘I loved my bookstore the way a woman loves, that is to say, truly’In 1921, Françoise Frenkel — a Jewish woman from Poland — opens Berlin’s very first French bookshop. It is a dream come true. The bookshop attracts artists and diplomats, celebrities and poets — even the French ambassador himself. It brings Françoise peace, friendship and prosperity. Then one summer’s day in 1939, the dream ends.It ends after Kristallnacht, when Jewish shops and businesses are smashed to pieces. It ends when no one protests. So, just weeks before the war breaks out, Françoise flees to France.In Paris, on the wireless and in the newspapers, horror has made itself at home. When the city is bombed, Françoise seeks refuge in Nice, which is awash with refugees and terrible suffering. Children are torn from their parents; mothers throw themselves under buses. Horrified by what she sees, Françoise goes into hiding. She survives only because strangers risk their lives to protect her.Unfolding in Berlin, Paris and against the romantic landscapes of southern France, No Place to Lay One’s Head is a heartbreaking tale of human cruelty and unending kindness; of a woman whose lust for life refuses to leave her, even in her darkest hours.Very little is known about the life of Françoise Frenkel. She was born in Poland in 1889 and later studied and lived in Paris; in 1921 she set up the first French-language bookshop in Berlin with her husband. In 1939, she returned to Paris, and after the German invasion the following year fled south to Nice. After several years in hiding, she made a desperate attempt to cross the border to Switzerland. Frenkel died in Nice in 1975. Her memoir, originally published in Geneva in 1945, was rediscovered in a flea market in 2010, republished in the original French and is now being translated and published in numerous languages for the first time.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press3 months ago
Dazzling, hallucinatory stories by Sara Gallardo, a rediscovered Argentinian contemporary of García MárquezAn old man wakes up one morning to find that his beloved garden, the envy of all his neighbours, is floating away — with him on board; a bored young woman decides to start a new, double life in Buenos Aires — with the useful prop of a spare head she keeps in her closet; a meek German missionary leaves Paraguay for the Pampas, completely unprepared for what he will encounter there at night.Land of Smoke is the first English translation of this recently rediscovered major Argentinian writer. Dazzling and hallucinatory, the stories collected here recall the masters of magical realism — but with Gallardo’s distinctive, idiosyncratic slant.Sara Gallardo was a celebrated and prize-winning Argentinian writer, born in Buenos Aires in 1931. Her first book was published in 1958, and by the time she died in 1988, she had published novels, short stories, children’s books, and essays. Written after the death of her second husband, Land of Smoke is the first of her books to be translated into English.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press3 months ago
Winner of the prestigious Akutagawa Prize, three dream-like tales of memory and warVisiting a friend in the French countryside, a man finds himself cast into the quandaries of historical whim, religious identity, and seeing without sight; a walk along the seashore, upon the anniversary of a death, becomes a reverie on building sandcastles; and an innocent break-in at the ruins of an archbishop's residence takes a turn towards disaster.In three stories that prove the unavoidable connections of our past, Toshiyuki Horie creates a haunting world of dreams and memories where everyone ends up where they began — whether they want to or not.Toshiyuki Horie (born 1964) is a scholar of French literature and a professor at Waseda University. He has won many literary prizes, including the Mishima Yukio Prize, Akutagawa Prize (for The Bear and the Paving Stone), the Kawabata Yasunari Prize, the Tanizaki Jun'ichiro Prize and the Yomiuri Prize for Literature (twice).
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Presslast year
Mary Stuart was condemned for high treason and executed at the age of forty-four. Held captive for twenty years by England's Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots, Queen of France and a claimant to the throne of England was embroiled in the power struggles that shook the foundations of Renaissance Europe from the moment of her birth to her death. With all the rigour of a scientist and the passion of an artist, Zweig has skillfully sketched a period full of political turmoil, as well as the fascinating character of Mary Stuart.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press4 months ago
An atmospheric love story with a twist by the author of The Rabbit Back Literature SocietyIn a small hillside town, Olli Suominen – publisher and discontented husband – is constantly losing umbrellas. He has also joined a film club. And Greta, an old flame, has added him on Facebook.As his life becomes more and more entangled with Greta's, and his wife and son are dragged into the aftermath of this teenage romance, Olli is forced to make a choice. But does he really want to know what the secret passages are? Can he be sure that Greta is who she seems to be? And what actually happened on that summer's day long ago?Tense, atmospheric and often very funny, Secret Passages in a Hillside Town is a magical Finnish story from the author of the acclaimed The Rabbit Back Literature Society.Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen, born in 1966, is one of Finland's best-kept secrets. A novelist and short-story writer, he is well known for his fantasy and sci-fi narratives and has twice won the Kuvastaja Fantasy Prize given by Finland's Tolkien Society and four times won the Atorox Award for Fantasy. He teaches Finnish language and literature and is the father of three sons. Pushkin Press also publishes The Rabbit Back Literature Society.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press5 months ago
A quixotic and funny tale about first love – from the Akutagawa Prize-winning author‘Ms Ice Sandwich isn’t friendly at all. When the customers come and stand in front of the glass case and stare at all the sandwiches and stuff inside it, she never bothers to say Hello or Can I help you?’Ms Ice Sandwich seems to lack social graces, but our young narrator is totally smitten with her. He is in awe of her aloofness, her skill at slipping sandwiches into bags, and, most electric of all, her ice-blue eyelids. Every day he is drawn to the supermarket just to watch her in action. But life has a way of interfering — there is his mother, forever distracted, who can tell the fortunes of women; his grandmother, silently dying, who listens to his heart; and his classmate, Tutti, no stranger to pain, who shares her private thrilling world with him.Tender, warm, yet unsentimental, Ms Ice Sandwich is a story about new starts, parents who have departed, and the importance of saying goodbye.Mieko Kawakami was born in Osaka in 1976. Her second novella, Breasts and Eggs (2008), won the Akutagawa Prize and has been translated into Norwegian, Spanish, French, Chinese, Korean and more. She has published many books, including novels, short stories, essays, and prose poems. In 2016, she was selected as one of Granta’s Best of Young Japanese Novelists.Louise Heal Kawai was born in Manchester, but has been a resident of Japan for about twenty-five years, and a translator of Japanese literature for the past ten. Her translations include the bestselling memoir Yakuza Moon by Shoko Tendo, the ground-breaking feminist novel by Taeko Tomioka, Building Waves, and A Quiet Place by the mystery writer Seicho Matsumoto. Ms Ice Sandwich is her second Mieko Kawakami translation.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press6 months ago
The gripping and elegiac stories of eight lost books, and the mysterious circumstances behind their disappearancesThey exist as a rumour or a fading memory. They vanished from history leaving scarcely a trace, lost to fire, censorship, theft, war or deliberate destruction. Yet those who seek them are convinced they will find them.This is the story of one man’s quest for eight mysterious lost books.Taking us from Florence to Regency London, the Russian Steppe to British Columbia, Giorgio van Straten unearths stories of infamy and tragedy, glimmers
of hope and bitter twists of fate. There are, among others, the rediscovered masterpiece that he read but failed to save from destruction; the Hemingway novel that vanished in a suitcase at the Gare de Lyon; the memoirs of Lord Byron, burnt to avoid a scandal; the Magnum Opus of Bruno Schulz, disappeared along with its author in wartime Poland; the mythical Sylvia Plath novel that may one day become reality.As gripping as a detective novel, as moving as an elegy, this is the tale of a love affair with the impossible, of the things that slip away from us but which, sometimes, live again in the stories we tell.Giorgio van Straten is director of the Italian Cultural Institute of New York and one of the editors of the literature review Nuovi Argomenti. He is the author of several novels, including the prize-winning My Name a Living Memory, along with two collections of short stories. He has translated the works of authors such as Kipling, London and Stevenson and has edited several works of non-fiction.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press6 months ago
A gripping unpublished diary from the bestselling diarist and biographer, covering Italy's descent into warIris Origo, one of the twentieth century’s great diarists, was born in England in 1902. As a child, she moved between England, Ireland, Italy and America, never quite belonging anywhere. It was only when she married an Italian man that she came to rest in one country. Fifteen years later, that country would be at war with her own.With piercing insight, Origo documents the grim absurdities that her adopted Italy underwent as war became more and more unavoidable. Connected to everyone, from the peasants on her estate to the US ambassador, she writes of the turmoil, the danger, and the dreadful bleakness of Italy in 1939–1940.Published for the first time, A Chill in the Air is the account of the awful inevitability of Italy’s stumble into a conflict for which its people were ill prepared. With an introduction by Lucy Hughes-Hallett, the award-winning author of The Pike, and an afterword by Katia Lysy, granddaughter of Iris Origo, this is the gripping precursor to Origo’s bestselling classic diary War in Val d’Orcia.Iris Origo (1902–1988) was a British- born biographer and writer. She lived in Italy at her Tuscan estate at La Foce, which she purchased with her husband in the 1920s. During the Second World War, she sheltered refugee children and assisted many escaped Allied prisoners of war and partisans in defiance of Italy’s fascist regime. Pushkin Press also publishes her bestselling diary, War in Val d’Orcia, which covers the years 1943–1944, as well as her memoir, Images and Shadows, and two of her biographies, A Study in Solitude and The Last Attachment.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press6 months ago
A beautiful gift edition of this cult classic of supernatural fiction, out in time for Halloween and ChristmasThe four uncanny and terrifying tales contained between these covers are all linked by their reference to a certain notorious play, a cursed, forbidden play that has spread like a contagion across the world, a play in which the second act reveals truths so terrible, and so beautiful, that it drives all who read it to lunatic despair: The King in Yellow.These stories are some of the most thrilling ever written in the field of weird fiction. Since their first publication in 1895 they have become cult classics, influencing many writers from the renowned master of cosmic horror H. P. Lovecraft to the creators of HBO’s True Detective.Robert W. Chambers (1865–1933) was an American author and artist. He was a prolific writer and enjoyed great success during his lifetime, with an output ranging from romance to science fiction. However, it is principally for the weird stories contained in The King in Yellow, which are regarded as some of the most important works of American supernatural fiction, that he is remembered today.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press6 months ago
The best fiction from across the Nordic region, selected and introduced by Sjón – Iceland's internationally renowned writerThe North: home of epic storytelling, birthplace of the saga, where stories of human survival have long been sculpted by the region's natural elements, from sheltering forests to islands lashed by unforgiving seas. This exquisite anthology, selected by Sjón and Ted Hodgkinson, collects fiction from across the Nordic region in all its thrilling diversity; storytelling that is often rooted in the world of folklore and fairytale, or sometimes stark realism, and typically served up with a dark and dry wit.Born in Reykjavik in 1962, Sjón is a celebrated Icelandic novelist and poet. He won the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize (the Nordic countries’ equivalent of the Man Booker Prize) for his novel The Blue Fox, and the novel From the Mouth of the Whale was shortlisted for both the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. His novel Moonstone – The Boy Who Never Was (2013) received every major literature prize in Iceland. Sjón’s biggest work to date, the trilogy CoDex 1962, was published in its final form in autumn 2016 to great acclaim and will be published in English by Sceptre. He has published nine poetry collections, written four opera librettos and song lyrics for various artists. In 2001 he was nominated for an Oscar for his lyrics in the film Dancer in the Dark. Sjón’s novels have been published in thirty-five languages.Ted Hodgkinson is a broadcaster, editor, critic, writer and Senior Programmer for Literature and Spoken Word at Southbank Centre, Europe’s largest arts centre. Formerly online editor at Granta magazine of new writing, his essays, interviews and reviews have appeared across a range of publications and websites, including the Times Literary Supplement, the Literary Review, the New Statesman, the Spectator, the Literary Hub and the Independent. He is a former British Council literature programmer for the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia. He currently sits on the judging panel of the Royal Society of Literature Encore Award for the best second novel and the selection panel for the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Fellowship. He has previously judged the BBC National Short Story Award, the British Book Awards and the Costa Book Awards.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press6 months ago
New translations of the greatest stories by the Russian master of the formChekhov was without doubt one of the greatest observers of human nature in all its untidy complexity. His short stories, written throughout his life and newly translated for this essential collection, are exquisite masterpieces in miniature.Here are tales offering a glimpse of beauty, the memory of a mistaken kiss, daydreams of adultery, a lifetime of marital neglect, the frailty of life, the inevitability of death, and the hilarious pomposity of ordinary men and women. They range from the light­hearted comic tales of his early years to some of the most achingly profound stories ever composed.Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was born in Taganrog, Russia, the son of a grocer. While training as a doctor he supported his parents and siblings with his freelance writing, working as a journalist and composing hundreds of short comic pieces under a pen name for local magazines. In his twenties he began to write major works of drama, including The Seagull, Uncle Vanya and The Cherry Orchard, but he continued to write extraordinary short stories up until his death from tuberculosis at the age of 44.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press7 months ago
What does eating out tell us about who we are?The restaurant is where we go to celebrate, to experience pleasure, to show off – or, sometimes, just because we're hungry. But these temples of gastronomy hide countless stories.This is the tale of the restaurant in all its guises, from the first formal establishments in eighteenth-century Paris serving 'restorative' bouillon, to today's new Nordic cuisine, via grand Viennese cafés and humble fast food joints. Here are tales of cooks who spend hours arranging rose petals for Michelin stars, of the university that teaches the consistence of the perfect shake, of the lunch counter that sparked a protest movement, of the writers – from Proust to George Orwell – who have been inspired or outraged by the restaurant's secrets.As this dazzlingly entertaining, eye-opening book shows, the restaurant is where performance, fashion, commerce, ritual, class, work and desire all come together. Through its windows, we can glimpse the world.Christoph Ribbat (b. 1968) has taught in Bochum, Boston and Basel, and is now Professor of American Studies at the University of Paderborn.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press7 months ago
An internationally acclaimed debut novel about war, family, love and belonging – and a talking catYugoslavia, 1980s: a 16-year-old Muslim girl named Emine is married off to a man she hardly knows. But what was meant to be a happy match soon goes terribly wrong. Her country is torn apart by war and she flees with her family.Decades later Emine's son, Bekim, has grown up a social outcast in Finland; both an immigrant in a country suspicious of foreigners, and a gay man in an unaccepting society. Aside from casual hookups, his only friend is a boa constrictor whom he lets roam his apartment – even though he is terrified of snakes.But one night in a gay bar, Bekim meets a talking cat who moves in with him and his snake. This witty, charming, manipulative creature starts Bekim on a journey back to Kosovo to confront his demons and make sense of the remarkable, cruel history of his family. It is a journey that will eventually lead him to love.Pajtim Statovci was born in 1990 and moved from Kosovo to Finland with his family when he was two years old. Published in Finland in 2014, his debut novel, My Cat Yugoslavia, received widespread acclaim among critics and readers alike, and won the Helsingin Sanomat Literature Prize in the category Best Debut. The novel has so far been translated into eleven languages. At present, Pajtim Statovci is undertaking master's degrees in comparative literature at the University of Helsinki and in screenwriting at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press8 months ago
Beautiful, emotionally resonant and achingly contemporary stories from the Man Booker International Prize Shortlisted authorIn these glittering tales, Dorthe Nors sketches ordinary lives taking unexpected turns: a walk amongst the herons in Copenhagen inspires depraved thoughts; a woman in an abusive relationship searches for explanations; a man Googles female serial killers while his girlfriend sleeps; a daughter watches silently as her mother succumbs to madness.Blending compassion with dark delight, Nors conjures up fresh moments of isolation and frail beauty with each cautionary glance.Dorthe Nors was born in 1970 and studied literature at the University of Aarhus. She is one of the most original voices in contemporary Danish literature. Her short stories have appeared in numerous international periodicals including The Boston Review and Harpers, and she is the first Danish writer ever to have a story published in the New Yorker. Nors has published four novels so far, including Mirror, Shoulder, Signal – shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize – and a novella Minna Needs Rehearsal Space, also published by Pushkin Press. Karate Chop won the prestigious P. O. Enquist Literary Prize in 2014. She lives in rural Jutland, Denmark.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press8 months ago
A moving novella unlike any other by the Man Booker International Prize shortlisted authorMinna is feeling desperate.Lars has just dumped her by text message. Her friends are constantly flaunting their lovers, children and dogs on Facebook. And her neurotic sister is everywhere she turns.Minna wants a place in Copenhagen to practise her music. Minna wants a child. But what Minna really needs is to get away from it all.So, with only Ingmar Bergman for company, she decides to take a trip to the coast.And there is more on the horizon than she might imagine.Dorthe Nors was born in 1970 and studied literature at the University of Aarhus. She is one of the most original voices in contemporary Danish literature. Her short stories have appeared in numerous international periodicals including The Boston Review and Harpers, and she is the first Danish writer ever to have a story published in the New Yorker. Nors has published four novels so far, including Mirror, Shoulder, Signal – shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize – and a collection of stories Karate Chop, also published by Pushkin Press. Karate Chop won the prestigious P. O. Enquist Literary Prize in 2014. She lives in rural Jutland, Denmark.
Pushkin Press
Pushkin Pressadded a book to the bookshelfPushkin Press8 months ago
A short yet fascinating account of Russia's most celebrated writerAlexander Pushkin (1799–1837) is widely regarded as Russia's greatest poet. In this short, exquisite biography, Robert Chandler – award-winning translator of Grossman, Platonov and Teffi – examines Pushkin as writer, lover and public figure. From the poet's early years, through his disagreements with politics and the law, to his untimely death in a duel, Chandler describes both the man himself and his turbulent period of history with elegance and erudition.Robert Chandler is an acclaimed and award-winning translator of Russian literature. As well as translating works by Teffi for Pushkin Press, including her collection of short stories Subtly Worded and her memoir Memories – From Moscow to the Black Sea, he has edited three anthologies for Penguin Classics and translated a number of books by Vasily Grossman and Andrey Platonov. He runs a monthly translation workshop at Pushkin House and has published poems in the TLS and Poetry Review.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)