The New Press

The New Press
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The New Press publishes books that promote and enrich public discussion and understanding of the issues vital to our democracy and to a more equitable world
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press13 days ago
A major new book that shows the world already has the tools to feed itself, without expanding industrial agriculture or adopting genetically modified seeds, from the Small Planet Institute expertFew challenges are more daunting than feeding a global population projected to reach 9.7 billion in 2050—at a time when climate change is making it increasingly difficult to successfully grow crops. In response, corporate and philanthropic leaders have called for major investments in industrial agriculture, including genetically modified seed technologies. Reporting from Africa, Mexico, India, and the United States, Timothy A. Wise’s Eating Tomorrow discovers how in country after country agribusiness and its well-heeled philanthropic promoters have hijacked food policies to feed corporate interests. Most of the world, Wise reveals, is fed by hundreds of millions of small-scale farmers, people with few resources and simple tools but a keen understanding of what and how to grow food. These same farmers—who already grow more than 70 percent of the food eaten in developing countries—can show the way forward as the world warms and population increases. Wise takes readers to remote villages to see how farmers are rebuilding soils with ecologically sound practices and nourishing a diversity of native crops without chemicals or imported seeds. They are growing more and healthier food; in the process, they are not just victims in the climate drama but protagonists who have much to teach us all.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
As seen in Men’s Journal, Smithsonian.com, and The GuardianThe author who Jeremy Scahill calls the “quintessential unembedded reporter” visits “hot spots” around the world in a global quest to discover how we will cope with our planet’s changing ecosystems After nearly a decade overseas as a war reporter, the acclaimed journalist Dahr Jamail returned to America to renew his passion for mountaineering, only to find that the slopes he had once climbed have been irrevocably changed by climate disruption. In response, Jamail embarks on a journey to the geographical front lines of this crisis—from Alaska to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, via the Amazon rainforest—in order to discover the consequences to nature and to humans of the loss of ice. In The End of Ice, we follow Jamail as he scales Denali, the highest peak in North America, dives in the warm crystal waters of the Pacific only to find ghostly coral reefs, and explores the tundra of St. Paul Island where he meets the last subsistence seal hunters of the Bering Sea and witnesses its melting glaciers. Accompanied by climate scientists and people whose families have fished, farmed, and lived in the areas he visits for centuries, Jamail begins to accept the fact that Earth, most likely, is in a hospice situation. Ironically, this allows him to renew his passion for the planet’s wild places, cherishing Earth in a way he has never been able to before. Like no other book, The End of Ice offers a firsthand chronicle—including photographs throughout of Jamail on his journey across the world—of the catastrophic reality of our situation and the incalculable necessity of relishing this vulnerable, fragile planet while we still can.
End of Ice, Dahr Jamail
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
“This is an expression not of people who are suddenly freed of something, but people who have been free all along.” —Ralph Ellison, speaking with Robert Penn WarrenA stunning collection of previously unpublished interviews with key figures of the black freedom struggle by the Pulitzer Prize–winning author In 1964, in the height of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, Pulitzer Prize–winning author and poet Robert Penn Warren set out with a tape recorder to interview leaders of the black freedom struggle. He spoke at length with luminaries such as James Baldwin, Martin Luther King Jr., Stokely Carmichael, Ralph Ellison, and Roy Wilkins, eliciting reflections and frank assessments of race in America and the possibilities for meaningful change. In Harlem, a fifteen-minute appointment with Malcolm X unwound into several hours of vivid conversation.

A year later, Penn Warren would publish Who Speaks for the Negro?, a probing narrative account of these conversations that blended his own reflections with brief excerpts and quotations from his interviews. Astonishingly, the full extent of the interviews remained in the background and were never published. The audiotapes stayed largely unknown until recent years. Free All Along brings to life the vital historic voices of America’s civil rights generation, including writers, political activists, religious leaders, and intellectuals.

A major contribution to our understanding of the struggle for justice and equality, these remarkable long-form interviews are presented here as original documents that have pressing relevance today.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
“I can think of no authors more qualified to research the complex impact of life sentences than Marc Mauer and Ashley Nellis. They have the expertise to track down the information that all citizens need to know and the skills to translate that research into accessible and powerful prose.”—Heather Ann Thompson, author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Blood in the WaterFrom the author of the classic Race to Incarcerate, a forceful and necessary argument for eliminating life sentences, including profiles of six people directly impacted by life sentences by formerly incarcerated author Kerry Myers Most Western democracies have few or no people serving life sentences, yet here in the United States more than 200,000 people are sentenced to such prison terms.

Marc Mauer and Ashley Nellis of The Sentencing Project argue that there is no practical or moral justification for a sentence longer than twenty years. Harsher sentences have been shown to have little effect on crime rates, since people “age out” of crime—meaning that we’re spending a fortune on geriatric care for older prisoners who pose little threat to public safety. Extreme punishment for serious crime also has an inflationary effect on sentences across the spectrum, helping to account for severe mandatory minimums and other harsh punishments.

A thoughtful and stirring call to action, The Meaning of Life also features moving profiles of a half dozen people affected by life sentences, written by former “lifer” and award-winning writer Kerry Myers. The book will tie in to a campaign spearheaded by The Sentencing Project and offers a much-needed road map to a more humane criminal justice system.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
The inspiring story of political newcomers (sometimes also newcomers to America) who are knocking down built-in barriers to creating better government The system is rigged: America’s political leadership remains overwhelmingly white, male, moneyed, and Christian. Even at the local and state levels, elected office is inaccessible to the people it aims to represent. But in People Like Us, political scientist Sayu Bhojwani shares the stories of a diverse and persevering range of local and state politicians from across the country who are challenging the status quo, winning against all odds, and leaving a path for others to follow in their wake.

In Anaheim, California, a previously undocumented Mexican American challenges the high-powered interests of the Disney Corporation to win a city council seat. In the Midwest, a thirty-something Muslim Somali American unseats a forty-four-year incumbent in the Minnesota house of representatives. These are some of the foreign-born, lower-income, and of-color Americans who have successfully taken on leadership roles in elected office despite xenophobia, political gatekeeping, and personal financial concerns. In accessible prose, Bhojwani shines a light on the political, systemic, and cultural roadblocks that prevent government from effectively representing a rapidly changing America, and offers forward-thinking solutions on how to get rid of them.

People Like Us serves as a road map for the burgeoning democracy that has been a long time in the making: inclusive, multiracial, and unstoppable.
People Like Us, Sayu Bhojwani
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2018“What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape is brilliant, frank, empowering, and urgently necessary. Sohaila Abdulali has created a powerful tool for examining rape culture and language on the individual, societal, and global level that everyone can benefit from reading.”—Jill SolowayIn the tradition of Rebecca Solnit, a beautifully written, deeply intelligent, searingly honest—and ultimately hopeful—examination of sexual assault and the global discourse on rape told through the perspective of a survivor, writer, counselor, and activist After surviving gang-rape at seventeen in Mumbai, Sohaila Abdulali was indignant about the deafening silence that followed and wrote a fiery piece about the perception of rape—and rape victims—for a women’s magazine. Thirty years later, with no notice, her article reappeared and went viral in the wake of the 2012 fatal gang-rape in New Delhi, prompting her to write a New York Times op-ed about healing from rape that was widely circulated. Now, Abdulali has written What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape—a thoughtful, generous, unflinching look at rape and rape culture.

Drawing on her own experience, her work with hundreds of survivors as the head of a rape crisis center in Boston, and three decades of grappling with rape as a feminist intellectual and writer, Abdulali tackles some of our thorniest questions about rape, articulating the confounding way we account for who gets raped and why—and asking how we want to raise the next generation. In interviews with survivors from around the world we hear moving personal accounts of hard-earned strength, humor, and wisdom that collectively tell the larger story of what rape means and how healing can occur. Abdulali also points to the questions we don't talk about: Is rape always a life-definining event? Is one rape worse than another? Is a world without rape possible?

What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape is a book for this #MeToo and #TimesUp age that will stay with readers—men and women alike—for a long, long time.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast month
An entirely fresh approach to ending the high school dropout crisis is revealed in this groundbreaking chronicle of unprecedented transformation in a city notorious for its “failing schools” In eighth grade, Eric thought he was going places. But by his second semester of freshman year at Hancock High, his D’s in Environmental Science and French, plus an F in Mr. Castillo’s Honors Algebra class, might have suggested otherwise. Research shows that students with more than one semester F during their freshman year are very unlikely to graduate. If Eric had attended Hancock—or any number of Chicago’s public high schools—just a decade earlier, chances are good he would have dropped out. Instead, Hancock’s new way of responding to failing grades, missed homework, and other red flags made it possible for Eric to get back on track.

The Make-or-Break Year is the largely untold story of how a simple idea—that reorganizing schools to get students through the treacherous transitions of freshman year greatly increases the odds of those students graduating—changed the course of two Chicago high schools, an entire school system, and thousands of lives. Marshaling groundbreaking research on the teenage brain, peer relationships, and academic performance, journalist turned communications expert Emily Krone Phillips details the emergence of Freshman OnTrack, a program-cum-movement that is translating knowledge into action—and revolutionizing how teachers grade, mete out discipline, and provide social, emotional, and academic support to their students.

This vivid description of real change in a faulty system will captivate anyone who cares about improving our nation’s schools; it will inspire educators and families to reimagine their relationships with students like Eric, and others whose stories affirm the pivotal nature of ninth grade for all young people. In a moment of relentless focus on what doesn’t work in education and the public sphere, Phillips’s dramatic account examines what does.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press2 months ago
A smart, snappy, and comprehensive guide for the millions of adults who are thinking about going—or going back—to college and want to know how to do it right

As anyone who has done it knows, going back to school is a major undertaking. For younger and older adults alike, starting or returning to school presents different challenges than those encountered by teens fresh out of high school and heading straight to college. Countless Americans take on this task while working, raising kids, caring for parents, volunteering, serving in the military—and in some cases all of the above. Although the “non-traditional” undergraduate student is in fact the new normal, the glut of college guides out there don’t include practical advice for the busy moms, frustrated employees, and ambitious adults who are applying to college or hoping to finish earning a degree.

Never Too Late will help readers jump-start a new professional path or speed down the one they’re already on by guiding them through vital questions: What should I study? How can I afford the time and money required to get a college degree? How do I compare schools? With key chapters on flexibility (“It’s About Time!” and “Face-to-Face or Cyberspace?”) and rankings of the best colleges for grown-ups diving back into the books, Never Too Late is an essential reference for adults seeking a richer life—and a meaningful place in our rapidly changing economy and world.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press2 months ago
One of Book Riot's “The Best Books We Read in October 2018”“To say this collection is transgressive, provocative, and brilliant is simply to tell you the truth.”—Roxane Gay, author of Hunger and Bad FeministSmart, humorous, and strikingly original essays by one of “America’s most bracing thinkers on race, gender, and capitalism of our time” (Rebecca Traister) In these eight piercing explorations on beauty, media, money, and more, Tressie McMillan Cottom—award-winning professor and acclaimed author of Lower Ed—embraces her venerated role as a purveyor of wit, wisdom, and Black Twitter snark about all that is right and much that is wrong with this thing we call society. Ideas and identity fuse effortlessly in this vibrant collection that on bookshelves is just as at home alongside Rebecca Solnit and bell hooks as it is beside Jeff Chang and Janet Mock. It also fills an important void on those very shelves: a modern black American feminist voice waxing poetic on self and society, serving up a healthy portion of clever prose and southern aphorisms as she covers everything from Saturday Night Live, LinkedIn, and BBQ Becky to sexual violence, infant mortality, and Trump rallies. Thick speaks fearlessly to a range of topics and is far more genre-bending than a typical compendium of personal essays. An intrepid intellectual force hailed by the likes of Trevor Noah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Oprah, Tressie McMillan Cottom is “among America’s most bracing thinkers on race, gender, and capitalism of our time” (Rebecca Traister). This stunning debut collection—in all its intersectional glory—mines for meaning in places many of us miss, and reveals precisely how the political, the social, and the personal are almost always one and the same.
Thick, Tressie McMillan Cottom
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
“A small miracle of a book, perfectly imagined and perfectly achieved.”—Hilary Mantel, author of Booker Prize-winning novels Wolf Hall and Bring up the BodiesA novel of war, revolution, youth, and friendship by the “remarkable” (Ian McEwan) French author of A Meal in Winter Hubert Mingarelli’s simple, powerful, and moving stories of men in combat have established him as one of the most exciting new voices in international fiction. In Four Soldiers he tells the story of four young soldiers in 1919, members of the Red Army during the Russian civil war. It is set in the harsh dead of winter, just as the soldiers set up camp in a forest in Galicia near the Romanian front line. Due to a lull in fighting, their days are taken up with the mundane tasks of trying to scratch together what food and comforts they can find, all the time while talking, smoking, and waiting. Waiting specifically for spring to come. Waiting for their battalion to move on. Waiting for the inevitable resumption of violence. Recalling great works like Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry, Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, and Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, Four Soldiers is a timeless and tender story of young male friendships and the small, idyllic moments of happiness that can illuminate the darkness of war.
Four Soldiers, Hubert Mingarelli
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
• Groundbreaking: Practical, no-nonsense strategies to address growing income inequality and the significant racial gap in income are in short supply. Friedman explains the problems, yes, but more importantly provides proven, tested solutions from forty years in the field.• Lively, engaging, and well-respected author: Told in stories of social entrepreneurs gathered over forty years, A Few Thousand Dollars shares lessons Bob Friedman has drawn from work the fields of poverty elimination and asset development. Author and his organization, Prosperity Now, will promote the book in the 25,000+ person/organization field.• Annual Conference of Prosperity Now: With 1300+ attendees, the annual asset development conference sponsored by Prosperity Now in September 2018 will feature the release of the book.• Author Expertise: Expert on asset development, anti-poverty policy, and community development. He has testified multiple times before Congress and state legislatures. • Public Intellectual: op-eds have been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and many other state and local papers. He has been interviewed by papers and media channels across the country including Al Jazeera, Forbes, and Harvard Alumni Magazine. • Events: Friedman will speak of significant public events throughout the country (full schedule to come) and promote the book in asset development field.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
Platform: Loomis blogs at the hugely popular site Lawyers, Guns, and Money, with 550,000 unique visitors for over one million pageviews a month, where his ongoing series “This Day in Labor History” (the basis for this book) won the 2011 Cliopatria Award from the History News Network Media track record: Loomis’s Out of Sight was featured in Salon, Truthout, In These Times, The Progressive, The Fiscal Times, and on radio Credentials: Loomis is a leading young scholar and public intellectual covering labor history. He is also an active commentator on contemporary politics, and his readers look to him to inform the present with knowledge of the past. He is listed on the “Professor Watchlist” of the right-wing Turning Point USA, alongside such other progressive threats as Brittney Cooper, Juan Cole, and Peter Singer Material: Wonderfully accessible introductory format; there are no other obvious introductory texts in labor history Serialization potential: Each chapter will stand alone and can be published as a “this day in history” format, for which Loomis is well known based on his online series of the same name New Press labor track record: From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend sold 18,000 copies combined; Lexicon sold 14,000 copies combined.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
Meet Money Rock—young, charismatic, and Charlotte’s flashiest coke dealer—in a riveting social history with echoes of Ghettoside and Random Family
Meet Money Rock. He’s young. He’s charismatic. He’s generous, often to a fault. He’s one of Charlotte’s most successful cocaine dealers, and that’s what first prompted veteran reporter Pam Kelley to craft this riveting social history—by turns action-packed, uplifting, and tragic—of a striving African American family, swept up and transformed by the 1980s cocaine epidemic. The saga begins in 1963 when a budding civil rights activist named Carrie gives birth to Belton Lamont Platt, eventually known as Money Rock, in a newly integrated North Carolina hospital. Pam Kelley takes readers through a shootout that shocks the city, a botched FBI sting, and a trial with a judge known as “Maximum Bob.” When the story concludes more than a half century later, Belton has redeemed himself. But three of his sons have met violent deaths and his oldest, fresh from prison, struggles to make a new life in a world where the odds are stacked against him. This gripping tale, populated with characters both big-hearted and flawed, shows how social forces and public policies—racism, segregation, the War on Drugs, mass incarceration—help shape individual destinies. Money Rock is a deeply American story, one that will leave readers reflecting on the near impossibility of making lasting change, in our lives and as a society, until we reckon with the sins of our past.
Money Rock, Pam Kelley
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
Behind the Curtain material: The public almost never gets to see inside a judge’s decision-making process; the theater of the court is designed to make the judges seem like impartial justice machines, and yet they struggle with the moral complexities of each case —this book will shed a light. Famous Cases: the Elián Gonzáles case, a landmark in US-Cuba relations, in which custody of a seven-year-old boy must be decided; the Terri Schiavo case in which a just must decide whether to take a woman in a persistent and terminal vegetative state off life support, as her husband wishes, but against the wishes of her parents.For readers of Scott Turow this will be gripping and popular, a perspective not usually available. High drama: fascinating cases in which judges try to override juries only to discover the juries know best; cases involving Native American tribal law and international law (one Minnesota judge sits on a war crimes tribunal in Kosovo); and heartrending cases involving infanticide and Munchausen disease (in which a parent intentionally makes a child sick).TNP strong track in field: The New Press has a well-respected and successful list in law and on criminal justice.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast year
Front-page news: Ferguson, Baltimore, New York, Cleveland—the policing of black men dominates the national media.
Sales record from a key media figure: Let’s Get Free sold over 11K in all editions.
Ideal author: Butler is an African American former federal prosecutor, a brilliant and original thinker, a gifted writer, and an experienced media commentator all rolled into one—there is no better person to write about this topic.
Media track record: Paul Butler is a legal analyst for CNN and MSNBC, and has appeared on 60 Minutes, Nightline, ABC, CBS, and NBC evening news, and national NPR. Butler writes for the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, the Chicago Tribune, and The Progressive, among others.
Radical: Butler doesn’t nip around the edges with modest suggestions; he advocates crashing the system and gives very clear instructions for how to do it. Not everyone will agree, but everyone will pay attention.
Blurbs/endorsements: Let’s Get Free was blurbed by Henry Louis Gates, Danny Glover, Anthony Romero, etc. We expect similar endorsements for Chokehold.
Chokehold, Paul Butler
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
“A bold, witty, and brilliantly argued analysis of the role pop culture has played in the rise of American extremism.”—Ruth Reichl“You’ll never look at your favorite movies and TV shows the same way again. And you shouldn’t.”—Steven SoderberghA bestselling cultural journalist shows how pop culture prepared Americans to embrace extreme politics Almost everything has been invoked to account for Trump’s victory and the rise of the alt-right, from job loss to racism to demography—everything, that is, except popular culture. In The Sky Is Falling bestselling cultural journalist Peter Biskind dives headlong into two decades of popular culture—from superhero franchises such as the Dark Knight, X-Men, and the Avengers and series like The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones to thrillers like Homeland and 24—and emerges to argue that these shows are saturated with the values that are currently animating our extreme politics. Where once centrist institutions and their agents—cops and docs, soldiers and scientists, as well as educators, politicians, and “experts” of every stripe—were glorified by mainstream Hollywood, the heroes of today’s movies and TV, whether far right or far left, have overthrown this quaint ideological consensus. Many of our shows dramatize extreme circumstances—an apocalypse of one sort or another—that require extreme behavior to deal with, behavior such as revenge, torture, lying, and even the vigilante violence traditionally discouraged in mainstream entertainment. In this bold, provocative, and witty investigation, Biskind shows how extreme culture now calls the shots. It has become, in effect, the new mainstream.
Sky Is Falling, Peter Biskind
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press6 months ago
“A marvelously informed, carefully crafted, far-ranging history of working people.”—Noam ChomskyAn updated edition of “an evergreen . . . comparable to Howard Zinn’s award–winning A People’s History of the United States” (Publishers Weekly)

Hailed as a work of “impressive even-handedness and analytic acuity” (Publishers Weekly, starred review), From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend has set the standard for viewing American history through the prism of working people. From indentured servants and slaves in seventeenth-century Chesapeake to high-tech workers in contemporary Silicon Valley, the book “[puts] a human face on the people, places, events, and social conditions that have shaped the evolution of organized labor” (Library Journal), enlivened by numerous full-page illustrations throughout from the celebrated comics journalist Joe Sacco.

In this fully updated new edition, authors Priscilla Murolo and A.B. Chitty have added a wealth of fresh analysis of labor’s role in American life, with new material on sex workers, disability issues, labor’s relation to the global justice movement and the immigrants’ rights movement, the 2005 split in the AFL-CIO and the movement civil wars that followed, and the crucial emergence of worker centers and their relationships to unions. With two entirely new chapters—one on global developments, from the movement of jobs offshore to the emergence of modern global union federations, and a second on the 2016 election and unions’ relationships to Trump—From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend will remain the standard, “comprehensive history of American labor” (The Washington Post).
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press9 months ago
Fearless books: Wolf Whistle Politics sold 8,150 copies and Rules of Resistance sold 6,483 copies
Events: Georgetown University Law Center and Vanderbilt University Law School will hold panel discussions around the book.
Collaborating organizations: The author has strong ties with The Anti-Defamation League, The Center For American Progress, the ACLU, The Southern Poverty Law Center, CAIR, United We Dream, GLSEN, The National Women’s Law Center, and The Jewish Defense League, which will all help promote
Media-savvy author: Arjun is regularly interviewed on national news outlets on issues of racial and religious profiling and national security. His work has been cited on CNN, BBC, NPR, The New York Times, The Independent, The Intercept, and the Washington Post.
Social Media: 10,500+ followers on Twitter and rising.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Presslast year
«With great compassion and analytical rigor, Cottom questions the fundamental narrative of American education policy, that a postsecondary degree always guarantees a better life..”—The New York Times Book Review More than two million students are enrolled in for-profit colleges, from the small family-run operations to the behemoths brandished on billboards, subway ads, and late-night commercials. These schools have been around just as long as their bucolic not-for-profit counterparts, yet shockingly little is known about why they have expanded so rapidly in recent years—during the so-called Wall Street era of for-profit colleges.In Lower Ed Tressie McMillan Cottom—a bold and rising public scholar, herself once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges—expertly parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry to show precisely how it is part and parcel of the growing inequality plaguing the country today. McMillan Cottom discloses the shrewd recruitment and marketing strategies that these schools deploy and explains how, despite the well-documented predatory practices of some and the campus closings of others, ending for-profit colleges won’t end the vulnerabilities that made them the fastest growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century. And she doesn’t stop there.With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, McMillan Cottom delivers a comprehensive view of postsecondary for-profit education by illuminating the experiences of the everyday people behind the shareholder earnings, congressional battles, and student debt disasters. The relatable human stories in Lower Ed—from mothers struggling to pay for beauty school to working class guys seeking “good jobs” to accomplished professionals pursuing doctoral degrees—illustrate that the growth of for-profit colleges is inextricably linked to larger questions of race, gender, work, and the promise of opportunity in America.Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed tells the story of the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of a for-profit education. It is a story about broken social contracts; about education transforming from a public interest to a private gain; and about all Americans and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.
The New Press
The New Pressadded a book to the bookshelfThe New Press8 months ago
★ “This well-told and inspiring tale, with its rarely discussed angle on the school segregation fight, will draw in readers interested in meaningful work and activism, or just a well-told tale.”—Publisher Weekly (Starred Review)In the epic tradition of Eyes on the Prize and with the cultural significance of John Lewis’s March trilogy, an ambitious and harrowing account of the devoted black educators who battled southern school segregation and inequalityFor two years an aging Dr. Horace Tate—a former teacher, principal, and state senator—told Emory University professor Vanessa Siddle Walker about his clandestine travels on unpaved roads under the cover of night, meeting with other educators and with Dr. King, Georgia politicians, and even U.S. presidents. Sometimes he and Walker spoke by phone, sometimes in his office, sometimes in his home; always Tate shared fascinating stories of the times leading up to and following Brown v. Board of Education. Dramatically, on his deathbed, he asked Walker to return to his office in Atlanta, in a building that was once the headquarters of another kind of southern strategy, one driven by integrity and equality. Just days after Dr. Tate’s passing in 2002, Walker honored his wish. Up a dusty, rickety staircase, locked in a concealed attic, she found the collection: a massive archive documenting the underground actors and covert strategies behind the most significant era of the fight for educational justice. Thus began Walker’s sixteen-year project to uncover the network of educators behind countless battles—in courtrooms, schools, and communities—for the education of black children. Until now, the courageous story of how black Americans in the South won so much and subsequently fell so far has been incomplete. The Lost Education of Horace Tate is a monumental work that offers fresh insight into the southern struggle for human rights, revealing little-known accounts of leaders such as W.E.B. Du Bois and James Weldon Johnson, as well as hidden provocateurs like Horace Tate.
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