A Joosr Guide to Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, Joosr
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A Joosr Guide to Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

Alexander Sokolov
Alexander Sokolovhas quoted2 years ago
your decision making and judgment always objective and practical?
The answer is a resounding “No!” In fact, our mind is conditioned to be optimistic even when it is not warranted. When undertaking a very risky endeavor, we may remain confident because of this misguided optimism. It clouds our rational ability to gauge risks, learn from past mistakes, or seek advice from people who have expertise in the area. This delusional “feel good” optimism keeps us from investing enough time in planning the endeavor. It gives us the false impression of having a great deal of control over a situation whilst, in fact, this may not at all be true.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
We are comprised of two distinct selves—the actual experience that we undergo (the experiencing self) and the memories that we subsequently make and keep of the experience (the remembering self). This duality causes cognitive illusions where the actual experience we had may be clouded by the memory that is left behind. Typically, you would remember a dinner date that ended badly as a horrible experience, even if the one hour that preceded the horrible ending was blissfully romantic. A mediocre meal that was topped off with a spectacular dessert may remain in your memory as a fantastic meal.
One peculiarity of this heuristic is that the duration of the experience does not seem to make any difference. The memory of the experience that is left behind manages to color the experience itself in every case. In particular, the final portion of the experience is what stays in our mind, and this is what determines how we view that experience as a whole. Importantly, this final conclusion that we draw about the experience influences how we make future decisions. In effect, these future decisions are being made on the basis of our memories of the experiences and not the actual experiences themselves.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
The truth is that no single event, situation, or achievement can make you “happy.” A state of happiness depends heavily on several different factors all coming together in your favor. You may think, for example, that you would be happy at work if only you had a bigger paycheck. But even if your boss gives you an unexpected pay rise, you will not immediately love your job. There are undoubtedly many more factors at play that might be preventing you from being happy: your enjoyment of the role, your feeling that you’re working harder than your colleagues, your relationship with your peers. Recognizing this fallacy helps you understand that even when your mind is telling you that things are or are not favorable, the reality may be completely different! We need to abandon the bird’s-eye view in favor of a more holistic view of our situations and experiences.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
Daniel Kahneman won a Nobel Prize in economics for this theory, which challenged the age-old “value of money” concept that economists have supported for years. Prospect theory states that: 1) the value of money can be assessed only on the basis of every individual’s reference point; 2) every individual is not sensitive to an identical degree about monetary loss; and 3) no one likes to lose money.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
This kind of accurate intuition stems from the mind’s reflexive, instinctive recognition of familiar patterns. As such, intuition may be trusted when it comes from a reliable expert in a field that offers enough predictability to create such patterns. In the case of the physician, he has seen innumerable patients with similar symptoms through his extensive career, and these experiences lay the foundation for his seemingly intuitive diagnosis.
We must therefore be careful to only rely on our intuition when we have a solid basis for trusting our gut feelings. For instance, a mother’s intuition can be trusted, as she knows her child incredibly well. In contrast, an intuitive feeling that someone you know might have a car crash is probably just an irrational fear.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
The typical human response is to choose the easiest way when confronted with a situation that requires thought, that is, evokes our System 1 thought process. Our brain tends to placidly move along the path of least resistance whenever it is left to its own devices. So even when you are confronted with a situation that seems dramatically different to what might be deemed “regular,” your brain will accept the least confusing explanation for it.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
Another influence that impacts our thought processes is our emotional response. When we are exposed to negative news about a specific topic, we tend to let our emotions cloud our judgment. For instance, say we have been reading news reports about a school shooting; we will begin to feel that school is unsafe despite the fact that school shootings are incredibly rare. Our mind unconsciously and inadvertently skews toward the less-rational belief or thought in many such situations. Understanding how and when this happens gives us the power to curb this reflexive tendency of ours and make better, more logical, more accurate decisions.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
Outside influences significantly impact our judgment, decision making, and choices, even though we may be completely unaware it.
Our mind responds to situations based on our previous experiences. For example, you would probably feel that you got a good deal if you bought a product that had been discounted from $30 to $25. However, you wouldn’t feel the same $25 was such a good deal if you had spotted it elsewhere priced at $22. In a similar vein, you tend to dislike a person with whom your first interaction was unsavory because your mind is primed against liking them.
dariia
dariiahas quoted2 months ago
System 1 is on auto-respond mode all the time, while System 2 needs to be called into action with some effort. System 1 gives the signals (impressions, feelings, gut instinct) based on which System 2 formulates set ideas and beliefs. When System 1 finds itself unable to handle a problem, it drafts in System 2 to help.
Alex Korolkov
Alex Korolkovhas quoted6 months ago
Is your decision making and judgment always objective and practical?

The answer is a resounding “No!” In fact, our mind is conditioned to be optimistic even when it is not warranted. When undertaking a very risky endeavor, we may remain confident because of this misguided optimism. It clouds our rational ability to gauge risks, learn from past mistakes, or seek advice from people who have expertise in the area. This delusional “feel good” optimism keeps us from investing enough time in planning the endeavor. It gives us the false impression of having a great deal of control over a situation whilst, in fact, this may not at all be true.
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
Outside influences impact your decisions without your knowledge
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
pure fact or pure logic should not always be used to draw conclusions or to judge. The person’s circumstances, frame of mind, and other factors have to be considered, too.
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
systems also work in conjunction—when you pay extra attention driving at night, for example, or when you consciously make an effort to remain polite even though your temper is frayed
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
systems also work in conjunction—when you pay
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
both systems also work in conjunction—when you pa
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
both systems also work in conjunction
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
System 2 thinking requires that you give uninterrupted attention to the task at hand. Typically, when you are doing something that is not an automatic reaction or not reflexive, System 2 comes into play. For example, you are searching for a friend in a huge crowd of people, or you are waiting to catch a particular phrase in a song.
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
take using the System 2 processes of rational thought.
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
System 1, which is almost involuntary, lays the foundation for most of our decision making, even many of those decisions that we
Proma Tasmi
Proma Tasmihas quoted9 months ago
mental activities are driven by two very contrasting systems—the intuitive and the deliberate.
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