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Helen Keller

The Story of my life; with her letters (1887-1901) and a supplementary account of her education, including passages from the reports and letters of her teacher, Anne Mansfield Sullivan, by John Albert Macy

    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    it is much better to have a few faults and be cheerful and responsive in spite of all deprivations than to retire into one's shell, pet one's affliction, clothe it with sanctity, and then set one's self up as a monument of patience, virtue, goodness and all in all
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    there are a few bitter drops in every one's cup, and the only way is to take the bitter patiently, and the sweet thankfully
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    no effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    patience and perseverance would win in the end
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    Akin to this idea of talking to the child about what interests him, is the principle never to silence a child who asks questions, but to answer the questions as truly as possible
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    Mathematics will never make them loving, nor will the accurate knowledge of the size and shape of the world help them to appreciate its beauties.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    In order to write one must have something to write about, and having something to write about requires some mental preparation. The memory must be stored with ideas and the mind must be enriched with knowledge before writing becomes a natural and pleasurable effort. Too often, I think, children are required to write before they have anything to say. Teach them to think and read and talk without self-repression, and they will write because they cannot help it.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    the language of educated people is the memory of the language of books
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    her joyous interest in everything and everybody
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    Yesterday's perplexities are strangely simple to-day, and to-day's difficulties become to-morrow's pastime.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    The "why?" is the DOOR THROUGH WHICH HE ENTERS THE WORLD OF REASON AND REFLECTION.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    obedience is the gateway through which knowledge, yes, and love, too, enter the mind of the child.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    Good sense, good humour, and imagination keep her scheme of things sane and beautiful.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    her hands have been so long her instruments of communication that they have taken to themselves the quick shiftings of the eye, and express some of the things that we say in a glance.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    Mark Twain has said that the two most interesting characters of the nineteenth century are Napoleon and Helen Keller.
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    there are more tares than wheat in these fertile
    fields of knowledge
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    my knowledge is very unstable; for I change my opinions
    with every new book I read
    Madina Kerimhas quoted5 years ago
    how passionately I desire that all who
    are afflicted like myself shall receive their rightful
    inheritance of thought, knowledge and love.
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