The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben
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Peter Wohlleben

The Hidden Life of Trees

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b7129997734
b7129997734has quoted2 years ago
fairy tales of trees with human faces, trees that can talk, and sometimes walk.
Ivan
Ivanhas quotedlast year
Life in the slow lane is clearly not always dull.
b7129997734
b7129997734has quoted2 years ago
fairy tales of trees with human faces, trees that can talk, and sometimes walk.
b5832205031
b5832205031has quoted7 months ago
The trees don’t want to take anything away from each other, and so they develop sturdy branches only at the outer edges of their crowns, that is to say, only in the direction of “non-friends.”
MM
MMhas quotedlast year
One of the oldest trees on Earth, a spruce in Sweden, is more than 9,500 years old
Mária Dobos
Mária Doboshas quoted14 days ago
One reason that many of us fail to understand trees is that they live on

Az egyik ok, ami miatt sokan nem értik meg a fákat, az, hogy élnek

kolobkor
kolobkorhas quotedlast month
Life in the slow lane is clearly not always dull.
timi sanchez
timi sanchezhas quotedlast month
eel, How They Communicate
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
Blossoms do not release scent at random or to please us. Fruit trees, willows, and chestnuts use their olfactory missives to draw attention to themselves and invite passing bees to sate themselves. Sweet nectar, a sugar-rich liquid, is the reward the insects get in exchange for the incidental dusting they receive while they visit. The form and color of blossoms are signals, as well. They act somewhat like a billboard that stands out against the general green of the tree canopy and points the way to a snack.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
However, when we step into farm fields, the vegetation becomes very quiet. Thanks to selective breeding, our cultivated plants have, for the most part, lost their ability to communicate above or below ground—you could say they are deaf and dumb—and therefore they are easy prey for insect pests.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
A tree’s silence could be because of a serious illness or, perhaps, the loss of its fungal network, which would leave the tree completely cut off from the latest news.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
different tree species are in contact with one another, even when they regard each other as competitors.10 And the fungi are pursuing their own agendas and appear to be very much in favor of conciliation and equitable distribution of information and resources.11
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
r. Suzanne Simard of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver has discovered that they also warn each other using chemical signals sent through the fungal networks around their root tips, which operate no matter what the weather.6 Surprisingly, news bulletins are sent via the roots not only by means of chemical compounds but also by means of electrical impulses that travel at the speed of a third of an inch per second.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
This ability to produce different compounds is another feature that helps trees fend off attack for a while. When it comes to some species of insects, trees can accurately identify which bad guys they are up against. The saliva of each species is different, and trees can match the saliva to the insect. Indeed, the match can be so precise that trees can release pheromones that summon specific beneficial predators
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
The reason for this behavior is astonishing. The acacia trees that were being eaten gave off a warning gas (specifically, ethylene) that signaled to neighboring trees of the same species that a crisis was at hand.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
Trees, it turns out, have a completely different way of communicating: they use scent.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
But why are trees such social beings? Why do they share food with their own species and sometimes even go so far as to nourish their competitors? The reasons are the same as for human communities: there are advantages to working together. A tree is not a forest. On its own, a tree cannot establish a consistent local climate. It is at the mercy of wind and weather. But together, many trees create an ecosystem that moderates extremes of heat and cold, stores a great deal of water, and generates a great deal of humidity.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
It appears that nutrient exchange and helping neighbors in times of need is the rule, and this leads to the conclusion that forests are superorganisms with interconnections much like ant colonies.
Raoul
Raoulhas quotedlast month
Scientists investigating similar situations have discovered that assistance may either be delivered remotely by fungal networks around the root tips—which facilitate nutrient exchange between trees1—or the roots themselves may be interconnected.2 In the case of the stump I had stumbled upon, I couldn’t find out what was going on, because I didn’t want to injure the old stump by digging around it, but one thing was clear: the surrounding beeches were pumping sugar to the stump to keep it alive.
Kandi Tolentino
Kandi Tolentinohas quotedlast month
“A chain is only as strong as its weakest link
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