Sandra Radovanović
Sandra Radovanovićhas quoted7 months ago
PAIN has an element of blank;

It cannot recollect

When it began, or if there were

A day when it was not.

It has no future but itself,

Its infinite realms contain

Its past, enlightened to perceive

New periods of pain
kraven
kravenhas quoted8 months ago
I measure every grief I meet
With analytic eyes;
kraven
kravenhas quoted8 months ago
A face devoid of love or grace,
A hateful, hard, successful face,
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
MY life closed twice before its close;
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
WHEN I hoped I feared,
Since I hoped I dared;
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
BEFORE I got my eye put out,
I liked as well to see
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
I’M nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
PAIN has an element of blank;
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
MUCH madness is divinest sense
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
THE heart asks pleasure first,
And then, excuse from pain;
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
I shall not live in vain.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
Forty gone down together
Into the boiling sand.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
SUCCESS is counted sweetest
By those who ne‘er succeed.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
As Dickinson herself predicted, her light may have gone out, but the lenses of later ages keep reflecting and refracting it in all sorts of inventive and unexpected ways. The intense eyes of the young woman in the photograph will keep peering into ours for a very long time.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
It should be noted that this edition arranges Dickinson’s poems by theme, and regularizes her punctuation and capitalization; readers eager for a version of the poems closer to the manuscripts should seek out Johnson’s edition, as well as the stimulating criticism of Cameron, Howe, and others.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
In Dickinson’s work, apparent opposites—hunger and fulfillment, the self and God, death and life—turn out to have more in common than we’d thought. In her more explicitly religious poems, she violently overturns traditional Christian beliefs in order to create her own homespun theology. Despite her revisionary zeal, Dickinson never completely abandons her faith in God: “I know that he exists,” she writes, “Somewhere, in silence” (p. 49). Rather, she is determined to explore new forms that God’s “existence” might take.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
Point of view in Dickinson’s hands is an unstable thing, too. The majority of her poems feature an “I” who tells stories, describes nature, or dissects belief (142 of them even begin with “I”), and her use of first-person perspective is every bit as innovative as is her handling of form, language, and structure. Writing to Higginson in July 1862, Dickinson remarked, “When I state myself, as the Representative of the Verse—it does not mean—me—but a supposed person” (Selected Letters, p. 176). Thus, in the two poems described above, Dickinson’s narrators are not actual people who lived and died in a specific time and place, but emblematic figures whose deaths might just as well be ours.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
With a few exceptions, Dickinson’s poems are quite short, and they consist of stanzas written in what is known as common measure, also called common meter: four iambic lines that alternate between four and three beats.
kraven
kravenhas quoted9 months ago
Although Dickinson never married, her passionate poems, as well as a series of letters that have come to be called “The Master Letters,” suggest that she may have been deeply in love at least once; it remains in doubt whether the object of her affection was Charles Wadsworth, Otis Lord, her sister-in-law Susan, or indeed any real person.
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