Reni Eddo-Lodge

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race

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aujahnesampsonhas quoted2 years ago
I can’t have a conversation with them about the details of a problem if they don’t even recognise that the problem exists
Muriel Pacheco Orozcohas quoted2 years ago
There was a feeling among some that unemployed young black people chose not to work, and instead took up lives of social aggravation.
uchihahas quoted2 years ago
The options are: speak your truth and face the reprisal, or bite your tongue and get ahead in life.
Jackiehas quoted2 years ago
I am only acutely aware of race because I’ve been rigorously marked out as different by the world I know for as long as I can remember. Although I analyse invisible whiteness and ponder its exclusionary nature often, I watch as an outsider. I understand that this isn’t the case for most white people, who move through the world blissfully unaware of their own race until its dominance is called into question. When white people pick up a magazine, scroll through the Internet, read a newspaper or switch on the TV, it is never rare or odd to see people who look like them in positions of power or exerting authority. In culture particularly, the positive affirmations of whiteness are so widespread that the average white person doesn’t even notice them. Instead, these affirmations are placidly consumed. To be white is to be human; to be white is universal. I only know this because I am not.
Maria Zatopihas quoted2 years ago
Even though I write about my experiences with so much contempt, feminism was my first love. It was what gave me a framework to begin understanding the world. My feminist thinking gave rise to my anti-racist thinking, serving as a tool that helped me forge a sense of self-worth. Finding it aged nineteen was perfect timing, equipping me with the skills to navigate adulthood, stand up for myself and work out my own values.
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
It could be that this misconception about exactly who fought for Britain during the First World War has led to a near erasure of the contributions of black and brown people. This is an erasure that couldn’t be further from the truth. Over a million Indian soldiers – or sepoys (Indian soldiers serving for Britain) – fought for Britain during the First World War.7 Britain had promised these soldiers that their country would be free from colonial rule if they did so. Sepoys travelled to Britain in the belief that they would not only be fighting for Britain, but by doing so they would be contributing to their country’s eventual freedom
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
The public pressure of the campaign was successful, and an Act of Parliament declared slavery abolished in the British Empire in 1833. But the recipients of the compensation for the dissolution of a significant money-making industry were not those who had been enslaved. Instead it was the 46,000 British slave-owning citizens who received cheques for their financial losses.3 Such one-sided compensation seemed to be the logical conclusion for a country that had traded in human flesh.
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
I had been denied a context, an ability to understand myself. I needed to know why, when people waved Union Jacks and shouted ‘we want our country back’, it felt like the chant was aimed at people like me. What history had I inherited that left me an alien in my place of birth?
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
In this context, it’s easy to view slavery as something Terrible, that happened A Very Long Time Ago. It’s easy to convince yourself that the past has no bearing on how we live today. But the Abolition of Slavery Act was introduced in the British Empire in 1833, less than two hundred years ago. Given that the British began trading in African slaves in 1562, slavery as a British institution existed for much longer than it has currently been abolished – over 270 years. Generation after generation of black lives stolen, families torn apart, communities split. Thousands of people being born into slavery and dying enslaved, never knowing what it might mean to be free. Entire lives sustaining constant brutality and violence, living in never-ending fear. Generation after generation of white wealth amassed from the profits of slavery, compounded, seeping into the fabric of British society
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
Black women’s reproductive systems were industrialised. Children born into slavery were the default property of slave owners, and this meant limitless labour at no extra cost. That reproduction was made all the easier by the routine rape of African women slaves by white slave owners.
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
It’s truly a lifetime of self-censorship that people of colour have to live. The options are: speak your truth and face the reprisal, or bite your tongue and get ahead in life.
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
The balance is too far swung in their favour. Their intent is often not to listen or learn, but to exert their power, to prove me wrong, to emotionally drain me, and to rebalance the status quo.
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 days ago
In culture particularly, the positive affirmations of whiteness are so widespread that the average white person doesn’t even notice them. Instead, these affirmations are placidly consumed. To be white is to be human; to be white is universal. I only know this because I am not
b0261375015has quotedlast month
To be white is to be human; to be white is universal. I only know this because I am not
b0261375015has quotedlast month
it conjures thoughts of clinical diversity monitoring forms, but in the interests of interpreting the research as accurately as possible
b0261375015has quotedlast month
black and minority ethnic (or BME
b0261375015has quotedlast month
people of colour’ is used to define anyone of any race that isn’t white
b0261375015has quotedlast month
It was never written with the intention of prompting guilt in white people, or to provoke any kind of epiphany
b0261375015has quotedlast month
It’s truly a lifetime of self-censorship that people of colour have to live. The options are: speak your truth and face the reprisal, or bite your tongue and get ahead in life.
b0261375015has quotedlast month
express frustration, anger or exasperation at their refusal to understand, they will tap into their pre-subscribed racist tropes about angry black people who are a threat to them and their safety
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