Andy Webb

Agile Project Management Methodology for Beginners: Scrum Project Management for Beginners

Notify me when the book’s added
To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How do I upload a book?
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Each team member typically has a special area of expertise that he or she brings to the team. However, each specialist is expected to work outside of that specialty and contribute to the team effort, as well as collaborating freely at all times.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    the product owner is the only person who can order work done or change the priority of work done. This division of authority allows the other players to focus on producing deliverables without concerning themselves with the variables of ROI.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    - Kanban: a lean development process pioneered by Toyota in the 1940s to support just in time (JIT) manufacturing
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Extreme Programming (XP): another well known variant of Agile, with special emphasis on customer involvement and satisfaction by making customer request for new features part of the development process
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Agile methods are characterized by their iterative and incremental qualities, relying on short bursts of activity, stakeholder testing and feedback, and incorporation of that feedback to constantly improve the product.
    - Scrum: the most popular and well known of the Agile methodologies, and the focus of this book
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    Responding to change over following a plan
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    Working software over comprehensive documentation
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Agile became a movement in February 2001, at a meeting at the Snowbird Resort in Utah. There, 17 software developers got together and refined the underlying principles of lightweight methodology into the Agile Manifesto.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Long Product Development Cycles: predictive (plan-driven) development models dictated that a program couldn’t be released until all of its features were finished and bug-free. The desire to release quality products is admirable, but the size and scope of those products meant they would be obsolete long before their release date.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Belief in Static Customer Expectations: another issue was the belief that customer demand could be captured in snapshot form and would conveniently remain unchanged while the development team did its thing. This might have been true before the internet, but as soon as consumers started using the web, customer demand for features began to shift on a daily basis. The old development models were aiming for a target that had long since ceased to exist.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Full-Featured Is Always Best: before Agile, there was a widespread dogma that good customer service always meant developing software with hundreds of features to address each and every perceived customer need, large or small, as if they were of equal importance. In reality, full-featured software was a limited market, and customers were hungry for simple programs that were easy to learn and would solve their specific problem.
    Alexandra Frolovahas quoted5 years ago
    Agile is a powerful tool for fostering teamwork and mutual support, but only when all of the team members share the same understanding of how it works.
    Timur Ahmetovhas quoted5 years ago
    Agile is a lightweight software development method that aims to be more efficient than traditional, plan-driven development models. Agile seeks to do more with less:
    - more team-level decision making
    - faster development time
    - faster response to shifting customer demands
    - faster problem solving
    - more customer satisfaction
    - smaller teams
    - less expense
    - less wasted effort
    - fewer features in the end product that either don’t work or are never used
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    but it is suggested that the number of stories presented should equal 150 percent of what the team reasonably feels it can handle within the sprint’s time limits
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    These meetings are kept short and to the point
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    The result is that both the product owner and the team have the same picture of what the deliverables will look like.
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    The product owner develops deliverables in the form of user stories
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    As a [type of user], I want to [do something] so that [some
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    They have the sole authority to decide who does what, and to estimate scheduling for a deliverable
    boxersfriendhas quoted6 years ago
    Simply put, the product owner is the only person who can order work done or change the priority of work done.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)