Quotes from “Never Split the Difference” by Tahl Raz,Chris Voss

Inez Wihardjo
Inez Wihardjohas quoted4 months ago
1. Use the late-night FM DJ voice.
2. Start with “I’m sorry . . .”
3. Mirror.
4. Silence. At least four seconds, to let the mirror work its magic on your counterpart.
5. Repeat.
Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted7 months ago
you’re an analyst you should be worried about cutting yourself off from an essential source of data, your counterpart. The single biggest thing you can do is to smile when you speak. People will be more forthcoming with information to you as a result. Smiling can also become a habit that makes it easy for you to mask any moments you’ve been caught off guard.
Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted7 months ago
Humanize yourself. Use your name to introduce yourself. Say it in a fun, friendly way. Let them enjoy the interaction, too. And get your own special price.
Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted7 months ago
He who has learned to disagree without being disagreeable has discovered the most valuable secret of negotiation
Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted7 months ago
We don’t compromise because it’s right; we compromise because it is easy and because it saves face.
Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted7 months ago
That’s why I tell my students that, if you’re trying to sell something, don’t start with “Do you have a few minutes to talk?” Instead ask, “Is now a bad time to talk?” Either you get “Yes, it is a bad time” followed by a good time or a request to go away, or you get “No, it’s not” and total focus.
Ilya Novikov
Ilya Novikovhas quotedlast year
People feel obliged to repay debts of kindness.
Ilya Novikov
Ilya Novikovhas quotedlast year
We don’t compromise because it’s right; we compromise because it is easy and because it saves face. We compromise in order to say that at least we got half the pie. Distilled to its essence, we compromise to be safe. Most people in a negotiation are driven by fear or by the desire to avoid pain. Too few are driven by their actual goals.
Ilya Novikov
Ilya Novikovhas quotedlast year
“Yes” and “Maybe” are often worthless. But “No” always alters the conversation.
Ilya Novikov
Ilya Novikovhas quotedlast year
Most of us enter verbal combat unlikely to persuade anyone of anything because we only know and care about our own goals and perspective.
Ilya Novikov
Ilya Novikovhas quotedlast year
Emotions aren’t the obstacles, they are the means.
Frei Elias Bindslev
Frei Elias Bindslevhas quotedlast year
To quiet the voices in your head, make your sole and all-encompassing focus the other person and what they have to say.

■ Slow. It. Down. Going too fast is one of the mistakes all negotiators are prone to making. If we’re too much in a hurry, people can feel as if they’re not being heard. You risk undermining the rapport and trust you’ve built.

■ Put a smile on your face. When people are in a positive frame of mind, they think more quickly, and are more likely to collaborate and problem-solve (instead of fight and resist). Positivity creates mental agility in both you and your counterpart.

There are three voice tones available to negotiators:

1. The late-night FM DJ voice: Use selectively to make a point. Inflect your voice downward, keeping it calm and slow. When done properly, you create an aura of authority and trustworthiness without triggering defensiveness.

2. The positive/playful voice: Should be your default voice. It’s the voice of an easygoing, good-natured person. Your attitude is light and encouraging. The key here is to relax and smile while you’re talking.

3. The direct or assertive voice: Used rarely. Will cause problems and create pushback.

■ Mirrors work magic. Repeat the last three words (or the critical one to three words) of what someone has just said. We fear what’s different and are drawn to what’s similar. Mirroring is the art of insinuating similarity, which facilitates bonding. Use mirrors to encourage the other side to empathize and bond with you, keep people talking, buy your side time to regroup, and encourage your counterparts to reveal their strategy.
Frei Elias Bindslev
Frei Elias Bindslevhas quotedlast year
KEY LESSONS

The language of negotiation is primarily a language of conversation and rapport: a way of quickly establishing relationships and getting people to talk and think together. Which is why when you think of the greatest negotiators of all time, I’ve got a surprise for you—think Oprah Winfrey.

Her daily television show was a case study of a master practitioner at work: on a stage face-to-face with someone she has never met, in front of a crowded studio of hundreds, with millions more watching from home, and a task to persuade that person in front of her, sometimes against his or her own best interests, to talk and talk and keep talking, ultimately sharing with the world deep, dark secrets that they had held hostage in their own minds for a lifetime.

Look closely at such an interaction after reading this chapter and suddenly you’ll see a refined set of powerful skills: a conscious smile to ease the tension, use of subtle verbal and nonverbal language to signal empathy (and thus security), a certain downward inflection in the voice, embrace of specific kinds of questions and avoidance of others—a whole array of previously hidden skills that will prove invaluable to you, once you’ve learned to use them.

Here are some of the key lessons from this chapter to remember:

■ A good negotiator prepares, going in, to be ready for possible surprises; a great negotiator aims to use her skills to reveal the surprises she is certain to find.

■ Don’t commit to assumptions; instead, view them as hypotheses and use the negotiation to test them rigorously.

■ People who view negotiation as a battle of arguments become overwhelmed by the voices in their head. Negotiation is not an act of battle; it’s a process of discovery. The goal is to uncover as much information as possible.
Anette Luther Christensen
Anette Luther Christensenhas quoted2 years ago
Another way to force “No” in a negotiation is to ask the other party what they don’twant. “Let’s talk about what you would say ‘No’ to,” you’d say.
Anette Luther Christensen
Anette Luther Christensenhas quoted2 years ago
Then, after pausing, ask solution-based questions or simply label their effect:
“What about this doesn’t work for you?”
“What would you need to make it work?”
“It seems like there’s something here that bothers you.”
People have a need to say, “No.” So don’t just hope to hear it at some point; get them to say it early.
Anette Luther Christensen
Anette Luther Christensenhas quoted2 years ago
When someone tells you “No,” you need to rethink the word in one of its alternative—and much more real—meanings:
■ I am not yet ready to agree;
■ You are making me feel uncomfortable;
■ I do not understand;
■ I don’t think I can afford it;
■ I want something else;
■ I need more information; or
Anette Luther Christensen
Anette Luther Christensenhas quoted2 years ago
that it doesn’t demand that you agree with the other person’s ideas (you may well find them crazy). But by acknowledging the other person’s situation, you immediately convey that you are listening. And once they know that you are listening, they may tell you something that you can use.
■ The reasons why a counterpart will not make an agreement with you are often more powerful than why they will make a deal, so focus first on clearing the barriers to agreement. Denying barri
andreybrindeew
andreybrindeewhas quoted6 days ago
The last rule of labeling is silence
andreybrindeew
andreybrindeewhas quoted6 days ago
We call that trinity “words, music, and dance.
andreybrindeew
andreybrindeewhas quoted6 days ago
The first step to labeling is detecting the other person’s emotional state.
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