Eleanor Coerr

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (Puffin Modern Classics)

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    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    classmates folded 356 cranes so that 1,000 were buried with Sadako. In a way she got her wish. She will live on in the hearts of people for a long time.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    looked at her flock hanging from the ceiling. As she watched, a light autumn breeze made the birds rustle and sway. They seemed to be alive and flying out through the open window. How beautiful and free they were! Sadako sighed and closed her eyes.

    She never woke up.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Sadako wanted to say more, but her mouth and tongue wouldn’t move. A tear slid down her cheek. She had brought her mother so much grief.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Toward the middle of October, Sadako lost track of days and nights. Once, when she was awake, she saw her mother crying.

    “Don’t cry,” she begged. “Please don’t cry.” S
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Did it hurt to die? Or was it like falling asleep?

    If only I could forget about it, Sadako thought. But it was like trying to stop the rain from falling. As soon as she concentrated on something else, death crept back into her mind.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Everyone laughed. Even Sadako. “Then I’ll wear it to classes every day when I’m well again,” she joked.

    Mitsue and Eiji giggled at the idea.

    For a little while it was almost like the good times they used to have at home. They played word games and sang Sadako’s favorite songs. Meanwhile, she sat stiffly in the chair, trying not to show the pain it caused her. But it was worth the pain. When her parents left, they looked almost cheerful.

    Before she went to sleep, Sadako managed to fold only one paper crane.

    Six hundred and forty-four...

    It was the last one she ever made.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    that moment Chizuko came in. Dr. Numata had given her permission to visit for a short time. She stared at Sadako in surprise. “You look better in that outfit than in school clothes,” she said.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Everyone agreed that she was like a princess in the kimono.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    handed Sadako a big box wrapped in gold paper and tied with a red ribbon. Slowly Sadako opened it. Inside was something her mother had always wanted for her—a silk kimono with cherry blossoms on it. Sadako felt hot tears blur her eyes.

    “Why did you do it?” she asked, touching the soft cloth. “I’ll never be able to wear it and silk costs so much money.”

    “Sadako chan,” her father said gently, “your mother stayed up late last night to finish sewing it. Try it on for her.”
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    reminded Sadako that there was always hope.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    of dying. She had to fight it as well as the disease. The golden crane helped.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Mrs. Sasaki could not speak. She took her daughter’s hand and held it tightly.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    “Hush!” Mr. Sasaki said in a funny voice. “That will not happen for many, many years. Don’t give up now, Sadako chan. You have to make only a few hundred more cranes.”
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Bon, the biggest holiday of the year. O Bon was a special celebration for spiri
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    and then Sadako drifted off into a strange kind of half-sleep.

    “When I die,” she said dreamily, “will you put my favorite bean cakes on the altar for my spirit?”
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    the next day Sadako had to return to the hospital
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    the end of a week Sadako was pale and tired again.
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    And it did. Her appetite came back and much of the pain went away. Dr. Numata was pleased with her progress and told Sadako she could go home for a visit. That night Sadako was so excited she couldn’t sleep. To keep the magic working she made more cranes.

    Six hundred and twenty-one.

    Six hundred and twenty-two...
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    over halfway to one thousand cranes,” she told Masahiro, “so something good is going to happen.”
    Jakob Bruus Ørtofthas quotedlast year
    Near the end of July it was warm and sunny. Sadako seemed to be getting better.
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