Quotes from “Think Like a Freak” by Stephen J.Dubner,Steven D.Levitt

Natallia Shauchenka
Natallia Shauchenkahas quoted9 months ago
The next time you’re in a real jam, facing an important question that you just can’t answer, go ahead and make up something—and everyone will believe you, because you’re the guy who all those other times was crazy enough to admit you didn’t know the answer.
vidannyy9615
vidannyy9615has quoted10 months ago
Knowing what to measure, and how to measure it, can make a complicated world less so.
Ilya Benjamin
Ilya Benjaminhas quoted3 years ago
The conventional wisdom is often wrong
Марина Ясинецкая
Марина Ясинецкаяhas quoted4 months ago
A moral compass can convince you that all the answers are obvious (even when they’re not); that there is a bright line between right and wrong (when often there isn’t); and, worst, that you are certain you already know everything you need to know about a subject so you stop trying to learn more.
Марина Ясинецкая
Марина Ясинецкаяhas quoted4 months ago
“I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week
Марина Ясинецкая
Марина Ясинецкаяhas quoted4 months ago
have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week
romerobermudezlb
romerobermudezlbhas quoted6 months ago
What’s wrong with that? When people don’t pay the true cost of something, they tend to consume it inefficiently.
romerobermudezlb
romerobermudezlbhas quoted6 months ago
most people are too busy to rethink the way they think—or to even spend much time thinking at all. When was the last time you sat for an hour of pure, unadulterated thinking? If you’re like most people, it’s been a while.
vidannyy9615
vidannyy9615has quoted9 months ago
Here is the broader point: whatever problem you’re trying to solve, make sure you’re not just attacking the noisy part of the problem that happens to capture your attention. Before spending all your time and resources, it’s incredibly important to properly define the problem—or, better yet, redefine the problem.
vidannyy9615
vidannyy9615has quoted9 months ago
Maybe we are asking too much of the schools and too little of our parents and kids?
vidannyy9615
vidannyy9615has quoted9 months ago
What’s wrong with our schools?” when in reality, the question might be better phrased as “Why do American kids know less than kids from Estonia and Poland?”
vidannyy9615
vidannyy9615has quoted10 months ago
ultracrepidarianism, or “the habit of giving opinions and advice on matters outside of one’s knowledge or competence.”
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
We might add that Winston Churchill, despite his famous advice to those Harrow schoolboys, was in fact one of history’s greatest quitters. Soon after entering politics he quit one party for another, and later he quit government altogether. When he rejoined, he quit parties again. And when he wasn’t quitting, he was getting tossed out. He spent years in the political wilderness, denouncing Britain’s appeasement of the Nazis, and was returned to office only when that policy’s failure had led to total war. Even in the bleakest moments, Churchill did not back down one inch from Hitler; he became “the greatest of all Britain’s war leaders,” as the historian John Keegan put it. Perhaps it was that long streak of quitting that helped Churchill build the fortitude to tough it out when it was truly necessary. By now, he knew what was worth letting go, and what was not.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
Now that we’ve arrived at these last pages, it’s pretty obvious: quitting is at the very core of thinking like a Freak. Or, if that word still frightens you, let’s think of it as “letting go.” Letting go of the conventional wisdoms that torment us. Letting go of the artificial limits that hold us back—and of the fear of admitting what we don’t know. Letting go of the habits of mind that tell us to kick into the corner of the goal even though we stand a better chance by going up the middle.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
That’s the idea behind a “premortem,” as the psychologist Gary Klein calls it. The idea is simple. Many institutions already conduct a postmortem on failed projects, hoping to learn exactly what killed the patient. A premortem tries to find out what might go wrong before it’s too late. You gather up everyone connected with a project and have them imagine that it launched and failed miserably. Now they each write down the exact reasons for its failure. Klein has found the premortem can help flush out the flaws or doubts in a project that no one had been willing to speak aloud.
This suggests one way to make a premortem even more useful: offer anonymity.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
When failure is demonized, people will try to avoid it at all costs—even when it represents nothing more than a temporary setback.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
If we have such a hard time recalling the most famous set of rules from perhaps the most famous book in history, what do we remember from the Bible?
The stories. We remember that Eve fed Adam a forbidden apple and that one of their sons, Cain, murdered the other, Abel. We remember that Moses parted the Red Sea in order to lead the Israelites out of slavery.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
Epstein discovered that straightforward recitation of the rules and regulations wouldn’t work. So he created a book of true stories called The Encyclopedia of Ethical Failure. It is a catalog of the epic screw-ups perpetrated by federal workers, divided into helpful chapters like “Abuse of Position,” “Bribery,” “Conflicts of Interest,” and “Political Activity Violations.” The Encyclopedia is one of the most entertaining publications in U.S. government history (which, to be fair, isn’t saying much). We hear about the “entrepreneurial Federal employee” who “backed his panel van up to the office door one night and stole all the computer equipment” and then “tried to sell everything at a yard sale the next day.”
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
What the Encyclopedia proved, at least to Steve Epstein and his Pentagon colleagues, is that a rule makes a much stronger impression once a story illustrating said rule is lodged in your mind.
☁️ ursula ☁️
☁️ ursula ☁️has quoted2 years ago
A story, meanwhile, fills out the picture. It uses data, statistical or otherwise, to portray a sense of magnitude; without data, we have no idea how a story fits into the larger scheme of things. A good story also includes the passage of time, to show the degree of constancy or change; without a time frame, we can’t judge whether we’re looking at something truly noteworthy or just an anomalous blip. And a story lays out a daisy chain of events, to show the causes that lead up to a particular situation and the consequences that result from it.
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)