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E. M. Forster

A passage to India

A Passage to India E. M. Forster — First published in 1924, A Passage to India is E. M. Forsters classic tale of prejudice and misunderstanding in colonial India. Widely considered to be one of the best novels of 20th century English literature, A Passage to India was based on Forsters own experiences in India while it was under the rule of the British Raj and the Indian independence movement was gaining in popularity. The novel centers around the tensions between the native people of India and the prejudices of the British ruling class. The central character is Dr. Aziz, a young Indian Muslim physician, who befriends several English visitors, against the advice of his Indian friends. Dr. Aziz is kind and helpful to the young Adela Quested and her elderly friend, Mrs. Moore, who are visiting India from England. He offers to take them sightseeing at a famous cave and a terrible misunderstanding ensues, which results in the innocent and trusting Dr. Aziz being accused of a terrible crime against Adela. Forsters depiction of Dr. Azizs fight for his freedom and his reputation, against the prejudices and misconceptions fostered by the British rule of India, has made this novel a timeless masterpiece of racial tension and oppression. This edition includes a biographical afterword.
359 printed pages
Copyright owner
Bookwire
Original publication
2021
Publication year
2021
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Impressions

  • Regina Azoulayshared an impression5 years ago
    👍Worth reading
    💞Loved Up

    Beautifully written, sweet and affectionate, really enjoyable.

  • Karina Saakyanshared an impression2 years ago
    👍Worth reading

  • Vlasovsshared an impression3 years ago
    👍Worth reading
    🚀Unputdownable

Quotes

  • Anna Uvarovahas quoted7 months ago
    so happened that Mrs. Moore and Miss Quested had felt nothing acutely for a fortnight. Ever since Professor Godbole had sung his queer little song, they had lived more or less inside cocoons, and the difference between them was that the elder lady accepted her own apathy, while the younger resented hers. It was Adela’s faith that the whole stream of events is important and interesting, and if she grew bored she blamed herself severely and compelled her lips to utter enthusiasms.
  • Anna Uvarovahas quoted7 months ago
    amidullah had called in on his way to a worrying committee of notables, nationalist in tendency, where Hindus, Moslems, two Sikhs, two Parsis, a Jain, and a Native Christian tried to like one another more than came natural to them. As long as someone abused the English, all went well, but nothing constructive had been achieved, and if the English were to leave India, the committee would vanish als
  • Anna Uvarovahas quoted7 months ago
    s for Miss Quested, she accepted everything Aziz said as true verbally. In her ignorance, she regarded him as “India,” and never surmised that his outlook was limited and his method inaccurate, and that no one is India.
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