Quotes from “Good Omens” by Neil Gaiman,Terry David John Pratchett

Plan A had worked. Plan B had failed. Everything depended on Plan C, and there was one drawback to this: he had only ever planned as far as B.
“Oh dear,” muttered Aziraphale, not swearing with the practiced ease of one who has spent six thousand years not swearing, and who wasn’t going to start now.
AZIRAPHALE COLLECTED BOOKS. If he were totally honest with himself he would have to have admitted that his bookshop was simply somewhere to store them. He was not unusual in this. In order to maintain his cover as a typical second-hand bookseller, he used every means short of actual physical violence to prevent customers from making a purchase. Unpleasant damp smells, glowering looks, erratic opening hours—he was incredibly good at it.
IT WAS A NICE DAY.

All the days had been nice. There had been rather more than seven of them so far, and rain hadn’t been invented yet.
It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people.
Neither of them left with quite the same spring in their step with which they’d arrived.
For every mad scientist who’s had a convenient thunderstorm just on the night his Great Work is finished and lying on the slab
Just because it’s a mild night doesn’t mean that dark forces aren’t abroad.
Newton beamed with pride. He was getting better.

💕💕💕

Even a casual observer could have seen that they were made by someone who was both painstaking and very careful, and also no good at making model airplanes. He was hopelessly proud of all of them, even the Spitfire, where he’d made rather a mess of the wings.

Aww Newt

the whole point was that when a human was good or bad it was because they wanted to be
And just when you’d think they were more malignant than ever Hell could be, they could occasionally show more grace than Heaven ever dreamed of. Often the same individual was involved. It was this free-will thing, of course. It was a bugger.

"[...] una prueba más de lo contradictorio que es el ser humano. Una pizca de bondad, una pizca de maldad y solo falta añadirle agua"

One of them had written it, hadn’t he . . . “Hell is empty, and all the devils are here.”

"L'enfer c'est les autres"

Oh, he did his best to make their short lives miserable, because that was his job, but nothing he could think up was half as bad as the stuff they thought up themselves.
It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people.
Offer people a new creed with a costume and their hearts and minds will follow.
They’d been brought up to it and weren’t, when you got right down to it, particularly evil. Human beings mostly aren’t.
Something told him that something was coming to an end. Not the world, exactly. Just the summer. There would be other summers, but there would never be one like this. Ever again.

Better make the most of it, then.
“When d’you think they’ll let you out, then?” asked Pepper.

“Not for years an’ years. Years an’ years an’ years. I’ll be an old man by the time they let me out,” said Adam.

“How about tomorrow?” asked Wensleydale.

Adam brightened. “Oh, tomorrow’ll be all right,” he pronounced. “They’ll have forgotten about it by then. You’ll see. They always do.”
Maybe it’s all part of a great big ineffable plan. All of it. You, me, him, everything. Some great big test to see if what you’ve built all works properly, eh? You start thinking: it can’t be a great cosmic game of chess, it has to be just very complicated Solitaire.
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