Lottie Stride

Write Every Time (Or Is That 'Right'?)

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    Некто Никтоhas quoted2 years ago
    Every name is called a noun,

    As field and fountain, street and town.

    In place of noun the pronoun stands

    As he and she can clap their hands.

    The adjective describes a thing,

    As magic wand and bridal ring.

    The verb means action, something done –

    To read, to write, to jump, to run.

    How things are done, the adverbs tell,

    As quickly, slowly, badly, well.

    The preposition shows relation,

    As in the street, or at the station.

    Conjunctions join, in many ways,

    Sentences, words, or phrase and phrase.

    The interjection cries out, “Hark!

    I need an exclamation mark!”

    Through poetry, we learn how each

    Of these make up the parts of speech.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    You use grammar every time you read or write or speak. Grammar gives you all the rules about how to put words together in sentences. Using the right grammar helps other people to understand what you mean.
    Mariahas quoted5 years ago
    English cats may ‘purr’, but French cats go ‘ron-ron’; and German cats go ‘schnurr’.
    Асяhas quoted4 months ago
    a business of ferrets

    an intrusion of cockroaches

    a descent of woodpeckers

    a labour of moles

    a pod of dolphins

    a shiver of sharks

    a wake of buzzards

    an unkindness of ravens

    a storytelling of rooks

    a murder of crows

    an ostentation of peacocks.

    бизнес хорьков

    вторжение тараканов

    спуск Дятлов

    труд Кротов

    стая дельфинов

    дрожь акул

    след стервятников

    недоброжелательность Воронов

    рассказ о Грачах

    убийство ворон

    демонстрация павлинов.

    Александра Загорулькоhas quoted7 months ago
    However, two negatives in a sentence contradict each other. ‘I don’t like running neither,’ for example, means you do like running. This is known as a double negative and should be avoided.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    Each part of a word with a vowel sound in it is called a ‘syllable’.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    I before e, except after c,
    Or when sounded like a
    As in neighbour and weigh.
    This means that, as a general rule, e should follow i in words such as ‘piece’, ‘believe’ and ‘field’ unless there is a letter c before it, as in ‘receipt’ and ‘receive’.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    exceptions to the rule
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    The letter y is counted as a consonant, but it’s also a part-time vowel. At the beginning of a word, such as ‘yes’ or ‘yacht’, it acts as a consonant; at the end of a word, such as ‘happy’ or ‘silly’, it acts as a vowel. In the case of the word ‘rhythm’, it’s definitely a vowel.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    The object is also a noun, and it is the part of the sentence that the action is happening to
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    here is a quick reminder of
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    gets on my nerves.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    you did something for a while, but don’t any more by adding the words ‘used to’:
    I used to play tennis.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    Pronouns’ are words which are used as stand-ins for nouns.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    Some nouns start with a capital letter. These are called proper nouns. They name one specific thing, such as a particular person or a particular country. Your name is a proper noun and so is the name of the country in which you live.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    If you say a man, you are talking about any man. If you say the man, you are talking about a particular man – a definite man.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    noun is a name for a thing, a person or a place. Words such as ‘bus’, ‘chair’, ‘dragon’, ‘firework’, ‘hosepipe’, ‘maggot’, ‘octopus’, ‘teacher’ and ‘tree’ are all nouns.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    How things are done, the adverbs tell,
    As quickly, slowly, badly, well.
    The preposition shows relation,
    As in the street, or at the station.
    Conjunctions join, in many ways,
    Sentences, words, or phrase and phrase.
    The interjection cries out, “Hark!
    I need an exclamation mark!”
    Through poetry, we learn how each
    Of these make up the parts of speech.
    Marina Chepurnovahas quoted5 years ago
    Every name is called a noun,
    As field and fountain, street and town.
    In place of noun the pronoun stands
    As he and she can clap their hands.
    The adjective describes a thing,
    As magic wand and bridal ring.
    The verb means action, something done –
    To read, to write, to jump, to run.
    How things are done, the adverbs tell,
    Julia Gospodinowahas quoted5 years ago
    For instance, 4/5 becomes four-fifths and 24 becomes twenty-four. Don’t go wild though – it’s five hundred and forty-eight, not five-hundred-and-forty-eight.
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