Charles Dickens

A Child's History of England

A Child's History of England is a book by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 to December 10, 1853. Dickens also published the work in book form in three volumes: the first volume on December 20, 1851; the second, December 25, 1852; and the third, December 24, 1853. Although the volumes were published in December, each was postdated the following year. They bore the titles: Volume I. — England from the Ancient Times, to the Death of King John (1852) Volume II. — England from the Reign of Henry the Third, to the Reign of Richard the Third (1853) Volume III. — England from the Reign of Henry the Seventh to the Revolution of 1688 (1854) Dickens dedicated the book to “My own dear children, whom I hope it may help, bye and bye, to read with interest larger and better books on the same subject”. The history covered the period between 50 BC and 1689, ending with a chapter summarising events from then until the accession of Queen Victoria. A Child's History was included in the curricula of British School children well into the 20th century, with successive editions published from 1851 to World War II.
570 printed pages

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Quotes

    b2220376833has quoted4 months ago
    It was a British Prince named Vortigern who took this resolution, and who made a treaty of friendship with Hengist and Horsa, two Saxon chiefs
    b2220376833has quoted4 months ago
    strong. At last, the Britons, unable to bear their hard condition any longer, resolved to make peace with the Saxons, and to invite the Saxons to come into their country, and help them to keep out the Picts and Scots
    b2220376833has quoted4 months ago
    For, the Romans being gone, and the Britons being much reduced in numbers by their long wars, the Picts and Scots came pouring in, over the broken and unguarded wall of Severus, in swarms. They plundered the richest towns, and killed the people; and came back so often for more booty and more slaughter, that the unfortunate Britons lived a life of terror. As if the Picts and Scots were not bad enough on land, the Saxons attacked the islanders by sea

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