Quotes from “Dietland” by Sarai Walker

Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 months ago
Pretending to be interested in a display of blushers, I picked up a compact of pink powder. I had always associated blushing with shame and embarrassment.
Ida Deichmann Madsen
Ida Deichmann Madsenhas quoted3 years ago
was fat, and if I no longer saw it as a bad thing, then the weapon they had used against me lost its power.
Marina Prokopets
Marina Prokopetshas quoted24 days ago
with the laces undone
Bárbara Conejeros
Bárbara Conejeroshas quoted2 months ago
From the time we’re little girls, we’re taught to fear the bad man who might get us. We’re terrified of being raped, abused, even killed by the bad man, but the problem is, you can’t tell the good ones from the bad ones, so you have to be wary of them all.
Bárbara Conejeros
Bárbara Conejeroshas quoted2 months ago
“You’ll grieve for her,” Verena said, “and then you’ll move on.”
Nora de la Cruz
Nora de la Cruzhas quoted3 months ago
couldn’t stand hunger. Hunger is what death must feel like.
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
An early and important source of inspiration for Dietland was Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk’s novel and the film adaptation directed by David Fincher. I would like to think that Dietland would exist even if Fight Club hadn’t provided that initial spark of an idea, but I’ll never know
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
The Virginia Woolf line “It is far harder to kill a phantom than a reality” appears in her essay “Professions for Women.”
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
Leeta was right. It felt good to be free. With unexpected power in my legs, I kept going, racing ahead with the wind and the sun on my face, taking a leap into the wide world, which now seemed too small to contain me.

Burst!
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
“That time I spent spying on you was the last happy time in my life,” she said. “I’ve thought of you often while I’ve been down here. Julia has given me updates on how your life has changed, and that’s offered some rare moments of joy. Wherever I end up, just know that I’m on your side.”
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
Soledad couldn’t be directly involved in the kidnapping because she would have been an obvious suspect, so she asked Leeta to go to the bar where Wilson and Martinez hung out and lure them to a vacant lot, where Missy would be waiting for them. “I would be the bait in a short dress and blond wig,” Leeta said. “I wasn’t in my right mind then. What’d happened to Luz was the worst thing that’d happened to anybody I’d ever known. I just kept thinking of her and all those crying women at the clinic and how this was never going to end. Despite my shock at Soledad’s plan, I began to wonder if she was right. Maybe we needed to go to the source of the problem.”
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
Leeta was silent, as if she’d closed up in her dark corner, but then she began to recount the story. In college, she was required to sign up for a community service project. She volunteered at a women’s clinic; Soledad worked there and trained Leeta to become a rape crisis counselor. The clinic offered abortions and birth control in addition to rape counseling. “Working there was intense,” Leeta said. “Bulletproof windows and an armed guard outside. Women had to pass by a guy with a gun just to get rape counseling, which is fucked up. Working there, it was easy to feel that it was us against the world—and the world didn’t care. Sometimes me and Soledad would go for drinks after our shift, to cope with hearing so many awful stories and seeing so many women cry.” Soledad was used to it, but Leeta said she struggled with the job.
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
In each place, the other children made fun of her for being chubby, for having an accent and a weird name: Soledad.

Dad! Daddy! Soleduddy!

When her family moved to Wyoming and she started another new school, she told the teacher her name wasn’t Soledad but Jennifer. The girls named Jennifer whom Soledad had met weren’t like her. They were blond or brunette and pretty. They didn’t have accents or dark skin. They had nicknames like Jenny or Jenna, names that no one laughed at. Soledad didn’t want to be laughed at. She wanted to blend in
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Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
On my way out, I took one last look around. The apartment was smaller than I remembered it, in the way that everything looks smaller after you’ve left it behind
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
This is how it was, I thought. This is what people did. They went to bars and chatted with strangers and then went home and had sex with them. All those nights when I locked myself in my apartment, watching television and eating my Waist Watchers dinners, this is what people my age were doing
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
She hadn’t been due to go home for another four weeks; she hadn’t prepared herself for the transition from that world of violence and death to her home in California. She learned after her first deployment that leaving the war meant crossing over from one state of mind to another, that there was a shift from soldier back to mother. Now she was only the mother of a dead girl
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
From: account7

To: Hannah_hannaH

Subject: Fight Back!

The police and the “justice” system don’t take violence against women and girls seriously. If you’ve been assaulted or harassed, take the law into your own hands. Form vigilante groups with other girls. Sign up for self-defense classes, but don’t just use the skills defensively. Go on the offensive
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted8 months ago
When the formalities of the funeral were over, she sent her mother to Texas with her sisters and the rest of her relatives. Two of the young men who’d raped her daughter were out on bail and they were going to die, she was sure of that. She’d killed before, it was easy. She was only a medic, and a woman, but she’d been trained to kill the enemy. That’s what she’d done and would continue to do.

Leaving the war meant crossing over. The mind of a soldier wasn’t the mind of a mother, but she wasn’t a mother anymore. When she was in Afghanistan, something had crossed over in her, and when she went home, it didn’t cross back.
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 months ago
In the hospital in Kandahar, Soledad was treated for a deep wound to the shoulder, blood loss, and infection. Her mind returned to the cloud, the choking black smoke and sand, the Taliban fighters she had killed. Several days passed before the doctors decided she was stable enough to learn about her daughter’s rape. Luz was still alive then, but it would be more than a week before Soledad was allowed to travel, and by that time Luz would have jumped in front of the train. Soledad feared that Luz had been angry with her for leaving her with her grandmother, for not being there to make everything all right.

Where was this girl’s mother? the people at home had said.

Until her weeping trio of sisters met her at the airport, Soledad didn’t fully believe that Luz’s suicide was real. When she arrived home, a photographer took a photo that ran across the wires: Army reservist Soledad Ayala arrives home in Santa Mariana, north of Los Angeles. Soledad went into the house and closed the door. Her mother was in bed, sedated and barely conscious, being tended to by relatives from out of town. She didn’t want to see her mother, who had failed Luz
Soliloquios Literarios
Soliloquios Literarioshas quoted9 months ago
When she awoke in the hospital three days later, she didn’t remember much, but she could see the man in the cloud, falling into the dirt and landing on his back, his legs twisted beneath him. She had never killed anyone before, but it had been easy. That’s what she remembered about it more than any other detail: how easy it had been
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