Oneworld Publications

Oneworld Publications
Oneworld Publications
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Oneworld was founded in 1986 by husband and wife team Juliet Mabey and Novin Doostdar as an independent publishing house focusing on stimulating non-fiction. Now publishing over 100 books a year, Oneworld has retained its founding commitment to the old-fashioned principles of great writing, editorial excellence, high production values, and marketing flair, to produce books that are read by the intellectually curious all over the world.
‘Without free speech there is no true thought.’
–Jordan Peterson
‘You’re telling me I’m being sensitive, and students looking for safe spaces that they’re being hypersensitive. If you’re white, this country is one giant safe space.’
–Michael Eric Dyson
Is political correctness an enemy of free speech, open debate and the free exchange of ideas? Or is it a progressive force, eroding the dominant power relationships and social norms that exclude marginalised groups from society?
Shortlisted for the Andrei Bely Prize and Russia’s National Big Book Award
International critical acclaim: Vodolazkin’s Laurus (also published by Oneworld) received rave reviews from the Financial Times, Time Literary Supplement, Huffington Post and The New Yorker, among others
A major voice in Russian fiction
WINNER OF THE EU PRIZE FOR LITERATURE
SHORTLISTED FOR THE KRESNIK AWARD
Twenty-five years into the future, a glitch in the global communications network is ripping a previously united world apart at the seams. The millennials find themselves hardest hit, trapped in a crumbling world they did not want – among them childhood friends Evan, an addict theatre director; Kras, a family patriarch and ex-war-minister; and Zoja, an anarchist poet. As they each prepare to celebrate their fiftieth birthdays, the friends desperately try to recapture the magic of their former lives and hold on to some sort of sense of belonging.
With its experimental style and sharp focus on the contradictions of modernity, In/Half is a powerful statement on the perils of the future, and on the nature of the novel, by an outstanding voice from the new generation of writers.
A character and plot-driven drama shedding new light on famous figures we thought we knew – Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Winston ChurchillRe-examines how our world came to be: Leebaert argues against the existing post-WWII narrative that has the British Empire collapsing in the late 1940s and America confidently assuming world leadership, contending that the US upheld the Empire as its ‘outer fortress’ until the British invasion of Egypt in 1956Contemporary relevance: China has said it’s emulating America’s post-WWII tactics in trying to become today’s global leader – if Beijing and others are studying this period as a playbook for today’s geopolitics, we certainly should, too
Enjoy these six short spooktacular stories, inspired by Rosie Strange and Sam Stone’s work at the museum…if you dare! These stories focus on characters that interact with Rosie and Sam in the Essex Witch Museum series and take place across a number of different time frames. Whether it be Rosie's old relatives, academic George Chin or the residents of Adders Fork – spooky incidents abound at every turn.
New York Times bestselling authors Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller transport you back to the world Buzzfeed compared to Ready Player One in the second book in a new trilogy perfect for fans of HBO’s Westworld and James Dashner’s The Eye of Minds. Imagine a future in which you can leave your body behind and give in to your greatest desires. That future is now. And the future is terrifying.

Simon saved his best friend, Kat, from the clutches of the Company and their high-tech VR gaming experience, Otherworld. But it was at a steep price. Now he, Kat, and their friend Busara are on the run. They know too much. About the Company’s dark secrets. About the real-life consequences of playing Otherworld. And about Kat’s stepfather’s involvement in everything. The group is headed to New Mexico to find Simon’s old roommate, who is a tech genius and possibly the only person who can help them reveal the truth about the Company to the world before it’s too late.
Martin’s life changes the day his dad is killed in a car accident. No one talks about it, his mum refuses to leave the house, and his only consolation through the sleepless nights is solving difficult maths problems. Until he forms an unlikely friendship with his neighbour Vusi who dreams of making a zombie movie. The two are plunged head first into a wild adventure, pulling everyone they know along with them. Shortlisted for the Found in Translation award, it has also since been made into a popular film in Afrikaans.
Just beneath the surface of our ordinary lives, strange phenomena lurk. Exciting physics doesn’t only show up in the Big Bang, or a black hole, or in the guts of giant particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider – it’s all around us.

Beginning at sunrise, Chad Orzel embarks upon a fascinating tour of the exotic science that underlies each moment of our every day. Did you know your alarm clock held secrets about quantum mechanics? And that the GPS on your phone has a built-in correction for the effects of relativity? In Breakfast with Einstein, the ordinary becomes extraordinary, everything is possible and the day’s end will find us dazzled.
When his most celebrated case is suddenly reopened, Detective Chief Inspector Jejeune‘s long-buried secrets threaten to come to light. Meanwhile, his girlfriend, Lindy, faces an unseen threat of her own, one which Jejeune may not be able to protect her from. Between fending off inquiries from the internal review and an open murder case to solve, more than ever Jejeune will have to rely on the help of the stalwart Sergeant Danny Maik. But Maik is learning things on his own that have caused him to question his DCI‘s actions, both past and present. In the current case, and in the former one, the facts seem clear enough. But it is in the silent spaces between the facts that the truth is often found.
Like the best comedians, the best cartoonists address philosophy’s Big Questions. Cathcart and Klein reckon they’re individuals with philosophy doctorates who couldn’t find employment or, if they could, found serving lattes at Starbucks less fulfilling than they’d hoped.

Covering topics as diverse as religion, gender, knowledge, morality and the meaning of life (or the lack thereof), I Think, Therefore I Draw is a joyous introduction to the major debates in philosophy through history and the present.

Wittgenstein once said that a serious and good philosophical work could be written that would consist entirely of jokes. Let’s put that to the test…
Judge not, lest ye be judged. This timeless wisdom has guided the Anglican Church for hundreds of years, and has fostered a certain tolerance of eccentricity among its members. The Reverend Robert Hawker invented the Harvest Festival, but he also excommunicated a cat for mousing on Sundays. Bishop Lancelot Fleming would commandeer Navy helicopters when he was late for service. The Reverend John Allington – 'Mad Jack', to his friends – wore a leopard skin instead of a surplice, and insisted on being carried around in a coffin.

A Field Guide to the English Clergy celebrates the cream of the crop: the drinkers (and publicans), the inventors, the lion tamers, the suicidal missionaries, and even one piratical Archbishop. But despite their sometimes bizarre behaviour, many in the clergy saw the church as their true calling. After all, who cares if you're wearing red high heels when there are souls to be saved?
With all due respect to bees, the termite is unquestionably the world’s most important insect. Without termites, life on earth would essentially evaporate. And yet an individual termite is practically invisible, not to mention wholly reviled by humanity.

For Lisa Margonelli, what begins as a bugtastic obsession becomes an exploration of our future. If we can harness the termite’s remarkable ability to remake their environment, will that help us avoid a global food crisis? If we create killer robobugs what happens if the swarms run off script?

A masterpiece of popular science, Underbug touches on everything from metaphysical meditation, technological innovation and the psychology of obsession to good old-fashioned biology.
Democracy is invoked to support the vast majority of the world's governments. We have been talking about it for thousands of years, and attempting to put it into practice for hundreds, believing in it as the logical culmination of human affairs. But if both North Korea and the United States consider themselves democratic – and, indeed, both liberals and conservatives, capitalists and communists, bureaucrats and populists – isn't the idea meaningless?

This is the biography of one of the world's most powerful ideas, a belief in the value of the collective, a battle between abstract rights and passionate convictions. In the end, only its citizens can decide on its fate.
Sir Walter Ralegh’s life is romantic, irresistible and of central importance to our island story. His death is a convoluted and contested tale of bargaining, failure and betrayal. Through the Elizabethan golden age and Ralegh’s famous adventures to the final act, Anna Beer presents his stranger-than-fiction life in all its richness.

How could a man once the Queen’s favourite find himself consigned to the Tower by her successor? Should his legacy be fame or infamy? Who was the real Sir Walter Ralegh?
Brought up by a staunchly religious family, Tirzah has always lived quite a sheltered life in the Welsh Valleys. As she reaches her teenage years, she begins to question her upbringing and her values, moving for the first time beyond the narrow confines of the world she knows. She begins a relationship with Osian, a local boy, but the guilt of their secret relationship weighs on them both heavily and they are soon forced to go their separate ways.Tirzah turns to the forest for comfort, where she finds another lost soul, a boy named Brân. As they try and find their way in the world, things take an unexpected turn and Tirzah finds herself experiencing things she could never have imagined.Tirzah and the Prince of Crows is an immersive, layered and powerful novel from acclaimed writer Deborah Kay Davies.
Democracies are being gamed. Authoritarian governments, moneyed elites and fringe hackers are exploiting our digital infrastructure and the vulnerabilities in our democratic system to influence our politics and elections. In just a few years, it has become a perpetual information war.

Inherently unstable and prone to wild volatility, our digital ecosystem has at its heart a vacuum open to the influence of those with the motivation, money or expertise to exploit it. Played successfully it can lead to unprecedented swings of public opinion.

Martin Moore explains how hackers interfere in our democratic processes, why they can do it and outlines what we need to do to save democracy for the digital age. This is a story about active measures, data mining, psy-ops, mercenaries, microtargeting, the alt-right, plutocrats, the collapse of local news, Silicon Valley, Trump, trolling, surveillance – and you.
The spark of life, fount of emotion, house of the soul – the heart lies at the centre of every facet of our existence. It’s so bound up in our deepest feelings that it can even suffer such distress from emotional trauma as to physically change shape.

Practising cardiologist Sandeep Jauhar beautifully weaves his own experiences with the defining discoveries of the past to tell the story of our most vital organ. We see Daniel Hale Williams perform the first open heart surgery and Wilson Greatbatch invent the pacemaker – by accident. Amid gripping scenes from the operating theatre, Jauhar tells the moving tale of his family’s own history of heart problems and, looking to the future, he outlines why the way we choose to live will be more important than any device we invent.
The hotly anticipated sequel to The Pictures. Guy Bolton’s unforgettable 1930s Hollywood fixer Jonathan Craine is thrust into the dark underbelly of the LA mafia, only to discover more secrets and lies

June 1947

Eight years have passed since the events of The Pictures.

Jonathan Craine has left his old life in Hollywood behind him, content to live out his days on a farm in rural California with his teenage son.

But when infamous mobster and Las Vegas founder Bugsy Siegel is killed at his home in Beverly Hills, Craine is forced to face his past once again.

Summoned to Las Vegas to meet mob head Meyer Lansky, Craine is given the impossible task of finding Siegel's murderers. He has no access to crime reports, no police contacts and no one to help in his investigation other than an ageing hit man and a female crime reporter with her own agenda. But Lanksy's orders aren't to be ignored; if Craine can't find Siegel's murderers in five days, he and his son will both be killed.
Everyone knows the term DNA. It is the essence of our being. It determines who we are and what we pass on to our children. Mention the ribosome, on the other hand, and you will usually be met with blank faces, even from scientists. And yet without the ribosome, nothing lives. For if DNA is data then it can’t go anywhere, or do anything, without a machine to process it. Unlocking the secrets of this gene-reading molecule was once among the most fundamental problems in molecular biology…

Nobel Prize winner Venki Ramakrishnan tells the story of the race to determine the structure of the ribosome and so resolve an ancient mystery at the heart of life itself. Illuminating, persuasive and compelling, Gene Machine not only reveals a great discovery but offers a fascinating insight into what it is like to work at the cutting edge of modern science amid the attending competition, politics and larger-than-life personalities.
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