Sarabande Books

Sarabande Books
Sarabande Books
38Books32Followers

One fee. Stacks of books

You don’t just buy a book, you buy an entire library… for the same price!

Always have something to read

Friends, editors, and experts can help you find new and interesting books.

Read whenever, wherever

Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read
A nonprofit literary press dedicated to quality poetry, short fiction, and essay.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books4 hours ago
“On the bridges to those slippery worlds, we are wrapped in gold foil, disease free. Who is saving whom? The question’s not stated, only implied.” In 2013, the Italian government implemented Mare Nostrum, an operation intended to limit immigration from Africa and the Middle East to European countries. For the refugees, the journeys were harrowing, often ending in shipwrecks or imprisonment, and the arrivals were wracked with uncertainty. Here, the poet Khaled Mattawa conjures a pointed, incantatory account of the refugee experience in the Mediterranean. In reclaiming the operation's name Mare Nostrum (our sea in Latin), he renders us culpable for the losses, and responsible to those risking their lives in pursuit of hope and respite from oppression. The voices are many, and the lyrics ritualistic, as if Mattawa has stirred ghosts from the wreckage. Part narrative, part blessing, this chapbook begs of its readers: Do you remember? Mattawa’s writing is a lighthouse for politics of the twenty-first century, and this chapbook a stunning memorial.
Mare Nostrum, Khaled Mattawa
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books4 hours ago
Sandra Cisneros has a fondness for animals and this little gem of a story makes that abundantly clear. “La casa azul,” the cobalt blue residence of Mister and Missus Rivera, overflows with hairless dogs, monkeys, a fawn, a “passionate” Guacamaya macaw, tarantulas, an iguana, and rescues that resemble “ancient Olmec pottery.” Missus loves the rescues most “because their eyes were filled with grief.” She takes lavish care of her husband too, a famous artist, though her neighbors insist he has eyes for other women: “He’s spoiled.” “He’s a fat toad.” She cannot reject him. “…because love is like that. No matter how much it bites, we enjoy and admire the scars.” Thus, the generous creatures pawing her belly, sleeping on her pillow, and “kneeling outside her door like the adoring Magi before the just-born Christ.” This beautiful chapbook is bi-lingual and contains several illustrations—line drawings by Cisneros herself.
Puro Amor, Sandra Cisneros
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books3 months ago
Shirley Temple tap dancing at the Kiwanis Club, Stevie Nicks glaring at Lindsey Buckingham during a live version of “Silver Springs,” Frank Ocean lyrics staking new territory on the page: this is a taste of the cultural landscape sampled in Your New Feeling is the Artifact of a Bygone Era. Chad Bennett casually combines icons of the way we live now—GIFs, smartphones, YouTube—with a classical lover’s lament. The result is certainly a deeply personal account of loss, but more critically, a dismantling of an American history of queerness. “This is our sorrow. Once it seemed theirs, but now it’s ours. They still inhabit it, yet we say it’s ours.” All at once cerebral, physical, personal, and communal, Your New Feeling Is the Artifact of a Bygone Era constructs a future worth celebrating.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
The poems of Witch Wife are spells, obsessive incantations to exorcise or celebrate memory, to mourn the beloved dead, to conjure children or keep them at bay, to faithfully inhabit one’s given body. In sestinas, villanelles, hallucinogenic prose poems and free verse, Kiki Petrosino summons history’s ghosts—the ancestors that reside in her blood and craft—and sings them to life.
Witch Wife, Kiki Petrosino
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
The Lake on Fire is an epic narrative that begins among 19th century Jewish immigrants on a failing Wisconsin farm. Dazzled by lore of the American dream, Chaya and her strange, brilliant, young brother Asher stowaway to Chicago; what they discover there, however, is a Gilded Age as empty a façade as the beautiful Columbian Exposition luring thousands to Lake Michigan’s shore. The pair scrapes together a meager living—Chaya in a cigar factory; Asher, roaming the city and stealing books and jewelry to share with the poor, until they find different paths of escape. An examination of family, love, and revolution, this profound tale resonates eerily with today’s current events and tumultuous social landscape. The Lake on Fire is robust, gleaming, and grimy all at once, proving that celebrated author Rosellen Brown is back with a story as luminous as ever.
The Lake on Fire, Rosellen Brown
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
A searing interrogation of identity, masculinity, and contemporary culture, Post Traumatic Hood Disorder's references range from Icarus to Sir Mix-A-Lot as the speaker assembles a bricolage self-portrait from the fractures of his past. Sliding between scholarly diction and slangy vernacular, Martinez's poems showcase a versatility of language and a wild-hearted poetic energy that is thoughtful, vulnerable, and distinctly American.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
Sometimes calculating, other times bewildered, Catapult's characters orbit around each other enacting the deeply human tragicomedy of wit and misunderstanding and loss. With dexterous, atmospheric, and darkly comic prose, Fridlund conjures worlds where longing is open-ended, intentions misfire, and the line between comfort and cruelty is often difficult to discern. A gripping collection, unsettling in its familiar strangeness.
Catapult, Emily Fridlund
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
«Threading the subtle seam between what lives and what remains, A Twenty Minute Silence Followed by Applause succeeds in conjuring the poetry of Marcel Marceau's performance as both a character on stage and in history. … Like pulling a ghost from a dark room, this is an accomplished work of historical portraiture: precise in its objects, complex in its melancholy, and insightful in its humor.» —Thalia FieldPart biographic inquiry, part lyric portraiture, radio producer Shawn Wen reanimates world-renowned mime Marcel Marceau's silent art.The book opens in darkness, a single figure standing in the spotlight. It's Marceau in his signature hat, painted face, black clothes, and ballet slippers. Over time, the text accumulates objects: dolls, paintings, icons, wives, children, cities, and performances. By turns whimsical and melancholic, this spare volume takes shape through capsule histories, interview clips, vivid scenes, and archival research.Shawn Wen is a writer, radio producer, and multimedia artist. Her writing has appeared in The New Inquiry, The Seneca Review, The Iowa Review, The White Review, and the anthology City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis (Faber and Faber, 2015). Her radio work broadcasts regularly on This American Life, Freakonomics Radio, and Marketplace. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships, including the Ford Foundation Professional Journalism Training Fellowship and the Royce Fellowship.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
Latest volume in Sarabande's well received Quarternote Chapbook SeriesFeaturing original interior illustrations by Sarabande designer (and accomplished graphic memoirist) Kristen RadtkeMary Ruefle has a large and devoted following in both poetry and essay communities Likely pickup for course adoptions
On Imagination, Mary Ruefle
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
Karyna MyGlynn takes readers on tour through the half-haunted house of the contemporary American psyche with wit, whimsy, and candid confession. Disappointing lovers surface in the bedroom; in the bathroom, “the drained tub ticks with mollusks & lobsters;" revenge fantasies and death lurk in the basement where they rightly belong. With lush imagery and au courant asides, Hothouse surprises and delights.Karyna McGlynn is the author of I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl and three chapbooks. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and Translation at Oberlin College.
Hothouse, Karyna McGlynn
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
Resurgent Author: With a newly released novel from University Press of Kentucky, a forthcoming memoir from W.W. Norton, and the recent re-issue of his entire backlist (UPK), Johnson is having his moment in the spotlight. Selected for the Linda Bruckheimer Series in Kentucky Literature: A recent selection, Arna Bontemps Hemenway's Elegy on Kinderklavier, won the PEN/Hemingway Award.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
Men carry a mattress retrievedfrom a dumpster past the floodedfoundations of an unfinishedhigh-rise, an old woman catchesa pigeon in the folds of her dressthe dead smile and rise from swimmingpools or stand at attentionon stamps. The landscape can't believeit's real—there is no groundbeneath it, like what mirrors do.Adam Day is the recipient of fellowships from the Poetry Society of America and Kentucky Arts Council, and a PEN Emerging Writers Award. His work has appeared in Boston Review, the Kenyon Review, American Poetry Review, AGNI, the Iowa Review, and others.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
«Smote is a book of the dark reality of our daily existence; it is a book of abiding grace.»—Robert Olen ButlerI release you like the crank-addled truck driverreleases his cargo at the midnight dockuntil the warehouse is one in a trailof crumbs, little light left on behind him. James Kimbrell is the author of The Gatehouse Heaven and My Psychic, and the co-translator of Three Poets of Modern Korea. He been the recipient of the Discovery/The Nation Award, a Whiting Award, a fellowship from the NEA, and a Morton Prize.
Smote, James Kimbrell
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
A Pulitzer Prize-winning author details an unconsummated love affair that sustains political, philosophical, and sexual interest over a lifetime.The truth is always differentfrom what anyone says out loud,but who really cares? Not I, said the manI chose to be, nor I nor I nor I—among the many of us she left teetering.Stephen Dunn is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of seventeen collections of poetry, most recently Lines of Defense, Here and Now, and What Goes On: Selected & New Poems: 1995–2009. He teaches at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
I have never been particularly interested in slavery, perhaps because it is such an obvious fact of my family's history. The fact that I am descended from slaves is hard to acknowledge on a day-to-day basis, because slavery does not fit with my self-image. Perhaps this is because I am pretty certain I would not have survived it.In the manner of Calvino's Invisible Cities, Wendy Walters deftly explores the psyches of cities such as Chicago, Detroit, Manhattan, and Portsmouth. In “Cleveland,” she interviews an African-American playwright who draws great reviews, but can't muster an audience. An on-air telephone chat between a DJ and his listeners drives a discussion of race and nutrition in “Chicago Radio.” In “Manhattanville” the author, out for a walk with her biracial son, is mistaken for his nanny. There's even a fable, imagining a black takeover of Norway. All of these essays explore societal questions—how eras of immense growth can leave us unable to prosper from that growth, how places intended for safety become fraught with danger, and how race and gender bias threaten our communities. As John D'Agata notes: “What probing, lively, ridiculously smart, gorgeously surprising essays.”Wendy S. Walters is the author of two books of poems, Troy, Michigan and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. Her work has appeared in Harper's, Bookforum, the Iowa Review, and many other publications. She is associate professor of creative writing at The New School University in New York.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
A much anticipated third collection with poems mourning a mother figure, as well as recently deceased cultural icons.Praise for Kathleen Ossip:“Ossip conjures delightful and unexpected muses…shrewd and ambitious.”—New York Times Book Review“The biggest surprise in poetry for 2011 is this second book by Kathleen Ossip. It’s got everything one could wish for in a new collection of poems. … It’s just beautiful. And terrifying.”—Publishers Weekly, Best Books of 2011“The poet has an uncanny ability to convey what it actually feels like to be alive today…Ossip is one of our foremost ethnographers of contemporary unreality.”—The Believer“How do you stay in heaven?” Ossip asks, “Is it a kind of sophisticated rewind?” Her third collection of poems is haunted by the idea of ‘rewind,’ and especially by the teasing possibility that we, too–like the moon, like a plant–may be granted cycles of life, death, and rebirth. The book's overarching narrative is the death of the poet’s stepmother-in-law, a cherished, loving, eccentric woman who returns to its pages again and again. But in spite of its focused grief and ontological urgency, The Do-Over is a varied collection–short acrostics mourn recently dead cultural icons (Amy Winehouse, Steve Jobs, Donna Summer); there's an ode to an anonymous Chinese factory worker, three “true stories” that read like anecdotes told over drinks, and more. The Do-Over is an unsentimental elegy to a mother figure, a fragmented portrait of its difficult, much loved subject. It's also a snapshot of our death-obsessed, death-denying cultural moment, which in Ossip's gifted hands turns out to be tremulous, skeptical, unsure of ultimate values and, increasingly, driven to find them. “I am still studying, aren’t you?” she begins. Readers will eagerly embrace the surprise, humor, and seriousness of her quest.
The Do-Over, Kathleen Ossip
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
In her first story collection, Jarrar employs a particular, rather than rhetorical approach to race and gender. Thus we have “How Can I Be of Use to You,” with its complicated relationship between a distinguished Egyptian feminist and her young intern, demonstrating that gender politics are never straightforward, and both generations—old and new—take advantage of each other. There's also a healthy dose of magic surrealism, as in the wild and witty story “Zelda the Halfie” which follows a breed of half Ibexes/half humans and their various tribulations. The writing is peppered with gorgeous imagery: a moon reflected in an ice cream scoop, breath that runs ahead of its body, and two apartments in a high rise whose tenants precisely mirror each other.Randa Jarrar is the author of a highly successful novel, A Map of Home, which received an Arab-American Book Award and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes & Noble Review. She grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the United States after the first Gulf War. Her work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, the Rumpus, the Oxford American, Ploughshares, and more. She blogs for Salon, and lives in California.
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
A pantoum about a child touching the smallpox-scarred face of an aunt; a dialogue between Jesus and Pilate in the form of a nursery rhyme; Joseph and Mary sleeping on the Sphinx's stone paw: these are some of the experiences brought before us in The Heronry.Mark Jarman is the author of ten poetry collections. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.
The Heronry, Mark Jarman
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
“There is lyricism in the language of Ms. Ermelino’s splendid collection that lulls us, line after seductive line, from the mundane to the menacing. Malafemmena is the work of a bold and original writer.”—Gay Talese  “What Louisa Ermelino knows about the heart could fill a book and has. The unadorned authenticity of her prose is so powerful, it gave me whiplash. I read Malafemmena in one sitting and wanted more, more, more. The writer's a genius, or an alchemist, or maybe both.” —Patricia Volk, author of Stuffed and Shocked “Louisa Ermelino is a gorgeous writer and master storyteller. Imagine a cross between Maugham and The Sopranos. She captures the madness, comedy, violence, and superstition of domestic life in NYC’s Little Italy, but also takes us all over the world—Jakarta, India, Turkey—where her characters stumble in and out of heartbreak and trouble. This book is irresistible. I loved it.”—Delia Ephron  Louisa Ermelino's vibrant stories follow women living dangerously near and far. At home in New York, they break ancient Italian taboos and fall victim to mobsters. Overseas, they smoke opium-laced hashish and sleep with strangers. Ermelino delivers dynamic, memorable characters in thoroughly engrossing prose. Louisa Ermelino is the author of three previous novels: Joey Dee Gets Wise (Kensington, 2004), The Black Madonna (Simon & Schuster, reprint, 2013), and The Sisters Mallone (Simon & Schuster, reprint, 2013). She is Vice President and Reviews Director at Publishers Weekly in New York City.
Malafemmena, Louisa Ermelino
Sarabande Books
Sarabande Booksadded a book to the bookshelfSarabande Books5 months ago
«The poems in Antiquity very much abandon themselves to language, to the collective poetic endeavor, and they do so in a rich, textured, and sustained voice.»—Mary Ruefle, from the introduction  Winner of the Kathryn A. Morton Prize, Michael Homolka’s Antiquity offers the present infused with the past, from Ancient Greece to the Holocaust to contemporary battlefields. A haunting and evocative debut.  Michael Homolka lives and works in New York City. Homolka’s poems have appeared in the New Yorker, Ploughshares, the Threepenny Review, and elsewhere.
Antiquity, Michael Homolka
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)