Milkweed Editions

Milkweed Books
Milkweed Books

One fee. Stacks of books

You don’t just buy a book, you buy an entire library… for the same price!

Always have something to read

Friends, editors, and experts can help you find new and interesting books.

Read whenever, wherever

Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Milkweed Editions is an independent book publisher based in Minneapolis. We publish 18-20 books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry annually. Our mission is to identify, nurture and publish transformative literature, and build an engaged community around it.
Milkweed Books
Milkweed Booksadded a book to the bookshelfMilkweed Editions 16 days ago
“My sister is pregnant with a Lemon this week, Week 14, and this is amusing. My mother's uterine tumor, the size of a cabbage, is Week 30, and this is terrifying.”When her mother is diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, Karen Babine—a cook, collector of thrifted vintage cast iron, and fiercely devoted daughter, sister, and aunt—can’t help but wonder: feed a fever, starve a cold, but what do we do for cancer? And so she commits herself to preparing her mother anything she will eat, a vegetarian diving headfirst into the unfamiliar world of bone broth and pot roast.In these essays, Babine ponders the intimate connections between food, family, and illness. What draws us toward food metaphors to describe disease? What is the power of language, of naming, in a medical culture where patients are too often made invisible? How do we seek meaning where none is to be found—and can we create it from scratch? And how, Babine asks as she bakes cookies with her small niece and nephew, does a family create its own food culture across generations?Generous and bittersweet, All the Wild Hungers is an affecting chronicle of one family’s experience of illness and of a writer's culinary attempt to make sense of the inexplicable.
A multicultural anthology, edited by Susan O’Connor and Annick Smith, about the enduring importance and shifting associations of the hearth in our world.A hearth is many things: a place for solitude; a source of identity; something we make and share with others; a history of ourselves and our homes. It is the fixed center we return to. It is just as intrinsically portable. It is, in short, the perfect metaphor for what we seek in these complex and contradictory times—set in flux by climate change, mass immigration, the refugee crisis, and the dislocating effects of technology.Featuring original contributions from some of our most cherished voices—including Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, Pico Iyer, Natasha Trethewey, and Chigozie Obioma—Hearth suggests that empathy and storytelling hold the power to unite us when we have wandered alone for too long. This is an essential anthology that challenges us to redefine home and hearth: as a place to welcome strangers, to be generous, to care for the world beyond one’s own experience.
Assigned to write an exposé on Richmond Hew, one of the most elusive and corrupt figures in the conservation world, a journalist finds himself on a plane to the Congo—a country he thinks he understands. But when he meets Sola, a woman searching for a rootless white orphan girl who believes herself possessed by a skin-stealing demon, he slowly uncovers a tapestry of corruption and racial tensions generations in the making.This harrowing search leads him into an underground network of sinners and saints—and everything in between. An anthropologist who treats orphans like test subjects. A community of charismatic Congolese preachers. Street children who share accounts of abandonment and sexual abuse. A renowned and revered conservationist who vanishes. And then there is the journalist himself, lost in his own misunderstanding of privilege and the myth of whiteness, and plagued by traumatic memories of his father. At first seemingly unrelated, these disparate elements coalesce one by one into a map of Richmond Hew's movements.
White, Deni Ellis Bechard
In The Mirrormaker, songwriter and poet Brian Laidlaw melds myths ancient and contemporary among the raspberries, wolves, and taconite mines of Minnesota’s Iron Range.A companion volume to Laidlaw’s 2015 project, The Stuntman, this collection fuses the stories of two fabled couples: the mythical Narcissus and Echo, and Bob Dylan and Echo Star Helstrom, subject of the song “Girl from the North Country.” But where The Stuntman focused on Narcissus, The Mirrormaker takes its primary inspiration from Echo, drawing on ecocritical readings of American history and interrogating the masculine logic of resource extraction.In these poems, Laidlaw explores themes of history and celebrity, love and longing, myth and meaning, in a landscape both ravaged and redemptive. He pits romantic obsession against self-obsession—“The first time I saw the moon / I thought it was my idea”—and asks whether a meaningful distinction can ever be drawn between the two. These themes are explored further in a companion song suite, written by Laidlaw and recorded with a longtime collaborator from the Iron Range, that accompanies this book via download. Sharp, searching, and ecstatically musical, The Mirrormaker is a genre-expanding exploration of boom and bust—in mining economies and in young love.
Mirrormaker, Brian Laidlaw
Coauthor Sarah Ruhl is Pulitzer Prize finalist and Tony Award nominated playwright whose book 100 Essays I Don’t Have Time To Write was a New York Times Notable Book in 2014
Coauthor Max Ritvo’s Four Reincarnations was named a Best Book of 2016 by Lit Hub, Shelf Awareness, the Irish Times, and Adroit Journal; it was reviewed by the New York Times Book Review, O, The Oprah Magazine, Publishers Weekly (starred), Booklist (starred), hailed as “one of the most original and ambitious first books“ by Louise Glück, and blurbed by Jean Valentine and the musician Tom Waits
We expect strong blurbs, reviews, and ordering from the poetry community as a result of the author’s massive network of supporters
Book’s focus on illness, spirituality, education, and friendship provides opportunities for wider coverage, crossover into larger markets
“Even present tense has some of the grace of past tense, / what with all the present tense left to go.” From Max Ritvo—selected and edited by Louise Glück—comes a final collection of poems fully inscribed with the daring of his acrobatic mind and the force of his unrelenting spirit.Diagnosed with terminal cancer at sixteen, Ritvo spent the next decade of his life writing with frenetic energy, culminating in the publication of Four Reincarnations. As with his debut, The Final Voicemails brushes up against the pain, fear, and isolation that accompany a long illness, but with all the creative force of an artist in full command of his craft and the teeming affection of a human utterly in love with the world.The representation of the end of life resists simplicity here. It is physical decay, but it is also tedium. It is alchemy, “the breaking apart, / the replacement of who, when, how, and where, / with what.” It is an antagonist—and it is a part of the self. Ritvo’s poems ring with considered reflection on the enduring final question, while suggesting—in their vibrancy and their humor—that death is not merely an end.The Final Voicemails is an ecstatic, hopeful, painful—and completely breathtaking—second collection.
Final Voicemails, Max Ritvo
From National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award finalist Ada Limón comes The Carrying—her most powerful collection yet.Vulnerable, tender, acute, these are serious poems, brave poems, exploring with honesty the ambiguous moment between the rapture of youth and the grace of acceptance. A daughter tends to aging parents. A woman struggles with infertility—“What if, instead of carrying / a child, I am supposed to carry grief?”—and a body seized by pain and vertigo as well as ecstasy. A nation convulses: “Every song of this country / has an unsung third stanza, something brutal.” And still Limón shows us, as ever, the persistence of hunger, love, and joy, the dizzying fullness of our too-short lives. “Fine then, / I’ll take it,” she writes. “I’ll take it all.”In Bright Dead Things, Limón showed us a heart “giant with power, heavy with blood”—“the huge beating genius machine / that thinks, no, it knows, / it’s going to come in first.” In her follow-up collection, that heart is on full display—even as The Carrying continues further and deeper into the bloodstream, following the hard-won truth of what it means to live in an imperfect world.
Carrying, Ada Limón
2018 National Poetry Series selection
Poems from the collection and author have been widely published, including in Poetry, the Washington Square Review, and PEN America
We expect strong blurbs, reviews, and ordering from the poetry community as a result of the author’s network of supporters
Book’s focus on trans bodies, queerness, and gender equity provides opportunities for wider coverage, crossover into larger markets, and promotion via LGBTQ media and communities
feeld, Jos Charles
Harvey. Maria. Irma. Sandy. Katrina. We live in a time of unprecedented hurricanes and catastrophic weather events, a time when it is increasingly clear that climate change is neither imagined nor distant—and that rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States in irrevocable ways.In this highly original work of lyrical reportage, Elizabeth Rush guides readers through some of the places where this change has been most dramatic, from the Gulf Coast to Miami, and from New York City to the Bay Area. For many of the plants, animals, and humans in these places, the options are stark: retreat or perish in place. Weaving firsthand accounts from those facing this choice—a Staten Islander who lost her father during Sandy, the remaining holdouts of a Native American community on a drowning Isle de Jean Charles, a neighborhood in Pensacola settled by escaped slaves hundreds of years ago—with profiles of wildlife biologists, activists, and other members of the communities both currently at risk and already displaced, Rising privileges the voices of those usually kept at the margins.At once polyphonic and precise, Rising is a shimmering meditation on vulnerability and on vulnerable communities, both human and more than human, and on how to let go of the places we love.
Rising, Elizabeth Rush
Winner of the inaugural Max Ritvo Poetry Prize, North American Stadiums is an assured debut collection about grace—the places we search for it, and the disjunction between what we seek and where we arrive.«You were supposed to find God here / the signs said.» In these poems, hinterlands demand our close attention; overlooked places of industry become sites for pilgrimage; and history large and small—of a city, of a family, of a shirt—is unearthed. Here is a factory emptying for the day, a snowy road just past border patrol, a baseball game at dusk. Mile signs point us toward Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Salt Lake City, Chicago. And god is not the God expected, but the still moment amid movement: a field «lit like the heart / of the night," black stars stitched to the yellow sweatshirts of men in a crowd.A map «bleached / pale by time and weather," North American Stadiums is a collection at once resolutely unsentimental yet deeply tender, illuminating the historical forces that shape the places we inhabit and how those places, in turn, shape us.
Saul Indian Horse is a child when his family retreats into the woods. Among the lakes and the cedars, they attempt to reconnect with half-forgotten traditions and hide from the authorities who have been kidnapping Ojibway youth. But when winter approaches, Saul loses everything: his brother, his parents, his beloved grandmother—and then his home itself.Alone in the world and placed in a horrific boarding school, Saul is surrounded by violence and cruelty. At the urging of a priest, he finds a tentative salvation in hockey. Rising at dawn to practice alone, Saul proves determined and undeniably gifted. His intuition and vision are unmatched. His speed is remarkable. Together they open doors for him: away from the school, into an all-Ojibway amateur circuit, and finally within grasp of a professional career. Yet as Saul’s victories mount, so do the indignities and the taunts, the racism and the hatred—the harshness of a world that will never welcome him, tied inexorably to the sport he loves.Spare and compact yet undeniably rich, Indian Horse is at once a heartbreaking account of a dark chapter in our history and a moving coming-of-age story.
How does it feel to experience another city? To stand beneath tall buildings, among the countless faces of a crowd? To attempt to be heard above the din?The poems of Another City travel inward and outward at once: into moments of self-reproach and grace, and to those of disassociation and belonging. From experiences defined by an urban landscape—a thwarted customer at the door of a shuttered bookstore in Crete, a chance encounter with a might-have-been lover in Copenhagen—to the streets themselves, where “an alley was a comma in the agony’s grammar,” in David Keplinger’s hands startling images collide and mingle like bodies on a busy thoroughfare.Yet Another City deftly spans not only the physical space of global cities, but more intangible and intimate distances: between birth and death, father and son, past and present, metaphor and reality. In these poems, our entry into the world is when “the wound, called loneliness, / opens,” and our voyage out of it is through a foreign but not entirely unfamiliar constellations of cities: Cherbourg, Manila, Port-au-Prince.A moving, haunting atlas to worlds both interior and exterior.
Another City, David Keplinger
Author has received a PEN award and the Griffin International Poetry Prize (2013)Author’s past work has been reviewed by or featured in Entertainment Weekly, the Guardian, Booklist, and GuernicaWe expect strong blurbs and ordering from the poetry community, as author is well respected thereAuthor works as an ER doctor and the book has crossover interest for medical and biology communityAuthor writes on how the body is foreign from his perspective as a Palestinian-American, which is timely for coverage
Author’s past work has been reviewed by or featured in Boston Review, Library Journal, and PleiadesWe expect strong blurbs and ordering from the poetry community, as Collins is well connected and well respected thereAuthor served as Pauline Delaney Professor of Creative Writing at Oberlin College and will have strong academic buy-inBook acts as a companion purchase to Collins’s 2014 collection Day Unto Day and will be marketed as suchAuthor’s deep social engagement in each collection will allow for timely media pitching to larger markets
Inaugural winner of the Jake Adam York Prize, selected by Ross Gay and presented in partnership with Copper NickelThe author’s star is quickly rising, this is her debut collection, but she has already published in the New Yorker, Boston Review, and was selected by Tracy K. Smith for inclusion in Best New Poets 2015Trinity University and the University of Houston, where she attended undergraduate and graduate programs, intend to support the bookBright Dead Things--14K copies sold to date--has shown us the extent of hunger for strong Latina voices. Analicia took on this project to “what it feels like to be a young Mexican American woman grappling with femininity within the confines of a Westernized historical narrative”
Virgin, Analicia Sotelo
From James P. Lenfestey, a collection of poems that lends delicacy and gentle humor to durable, long-lasting love.Writing love poems fifty years into a marriage is no easy task: «If he exaggerates his love, she'll know … And if his desire for her is undiminished, / who would believe?» But in A Marriage Book, Lenfestey meets his own challenge with aplomb. These poems drop readers into the rich, textured world of one couple's enduring intimacy, from the warmth of a bedroom occupied by two to squabbles over miscommunications and crumbs in the kitchen.As the marriage (and the Book) transition into parenthood, Lenfestey illuminates the equally stalwart wonder of observing one's children as they age and develop. Paternal love persists, and is even fed by, watching his children argue, suffer their own mistakes, and roar horrible breath at breakfast. So much poetry is about storms, / bruised fruit, locusts eating everything," he writes. “This poem is about a harvest that satisfies.”A Marriage Book is a collection that essences the magic from the household quotidian, creating a technicolor portrait of a vibrant and dynamic family.
Winner of the 2017 Lindquist & Vennum Prize for Poetry, selected by Srikanth ReddyProject books are selling well in the poetry market, see the strong sales of Cold Pastoral or I Know Your Kind for examplesGeorg Trakl is considered one of Europe’s most important expressionists, this creative exploration of his and his sister’s lives will resonate across the world of poetry
Midway through the journey of his life, Dan Beachy-Quick found himself without a path, unsure how to live well. Of Silence and Song follows him on his resulting classical search for meaning in the world and in his particular, quiet life. In essays, fragments, marginalia, images, travel writing, and poetry, Beachy-Quick traces his relationships and identities. As father and husband. As teacher and student. As citizen and scholar. And as poet and reader, wondering at the potential and limits of literature.Of Silence and Song finds its inferno—and its paradise—in moments both historically vast and nakedly intimate. Hell: disappearing bees, James Eagan Holmes, Columbine, and the persistent, unforgivable crime of slavery. And redemption: in the art of Marcel Duchamp, the pressed flowers in Emily Dickinson’s Bible, and long walks with his youngest daughter.Curious, earnest, and masterful, Of Silence and Song is an unforgettable exploration of the human soul.
A Commonwealth Prize Winner and often featured in “Best of” lists for writing from Australia and New Zealand, author is well positioned to break out with his first work to be published outside of his regionExpecting blurbs from Eowyn Ivey (The Snow Child), Eleanor Catton (Man Booker prize winner), with a likely blurb from Jim ShepardA literary title, that contains universal questions about the ego, imitation, and the artistic process, but also a deeply engaging, haunting thrillerAuthor participated in the University of Iowa’s International Writer’s Program, led by Christopher Merrill, and lived in Iowa City for four months, cementing strong connections with the literary community in the US
Mannequin Makers, Craig Cliff
From celebrated poet Eric Pankey, a collection exploring the presence of the divine in the seemingly ordinary.The ancient Romans practiced augury, reading omens in bird's flight patterns. In the poems of Augury, revelation is found in nature's smallest details: a lizard's quick movements, a tree scarred by lighting, the white curve of a snail's shell. Here the sensory world and the imagined one collide in unexpected and wonderful ways, as Pankey scrutinizes the physical for meaning, and that meaning for truth.With uncommon grace, each of Pankey's precise lyrics advances our shared ontological questions and expresses our deepest contradictions. In a world of mystery, should we focus on finding meaning or creating it? How can the known—and the unknown— be captured in language?Augury is a masterful and magical collection from a poet of stirring intelligence, “a book of stones unstitched from the wolf's belly.”
Augury, Eric Pankey
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)