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Summary: 10 Insider Secrets To Job Hunting Success – Todd Bermont

Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
A job interview will naturally move through six phases:
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
A good cover letter:
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
good cover letter:
Is concise– short and to the point.
Is customized to the position that is advertised.
Is creative– it tells the company what the benefits of hiring you will be.
Always asks for an interview– as the next step in finding out how you can be of service to the company involved.
Your Name and Address The date and address goes here.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
A good cover letter:
Is concise– short and to the point.
Is customized to the position that is advertised.
Is creative– it tells the company what the benefits of hiring you will be.
Always asks for an interview– as the next step in finding out how you can be of service to the company involved.
Your Name and Address The date and address goes here.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
At the bottom of each page, you should include all your contact de
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Your name should be at the top of each page of your resume.
Profile - a quick snapshot of who you are and what you have to offer a prospective employer.
Expertise - Your areas of knowledge, know-how, skills and professional interests.
Experience - who you have worked for, the periods you were employed and a few bullet points on what you personally achieved for each previous employer.
Recognition - any awards, achievements, or accomplishments which were recognized by others.
Education - colleges, university degrees, training courses, professional groups you belong to.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
My Top Four Personal Strengths
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Personal Strengths Worksheet
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Also be aware of the six phases the interview will go through and make certain you cover all the appropriate bases in each specific phase.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
By understanding the character traits interviewers are looking for, you can position yourself advantageously. This doesn’t involve deception. Instead, you emphasize aspects of your personality you might normally ignore.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Conduct a personal inventory and identify the job-related experiences and strengths you have
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Identify your key personal selling points.
Julia Hisamovahas quoted3 years ago
Identify your key personal selling points
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
“Be confident, have fun and, most of all, be positive about the contribution you can make! Use the ideal job mission statement you created as your personal mantra. Believe in your destiny and you will achieve it. The worst that happens is you get bounced from the interview. So what? If your mission is your destiny, then one rejection will not stop you from achieving it. Having a positive mental attitude will give you every chance to succeed in the interview. Interviewing is nothing more than a game. There are winners and losers. To win, you have to have a better strategy than the others.”
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
A job interview will naturally move through six phases:

Introduction – where you want to concentrate on making a terrific first impression with your grooming, a smile and a firm handshake.
Rapport building – where you encourage the interviewer to feel good about you by finding some common areas of interest. To do this, relax a little and speak in a friendly, conversation tone of voice. And smile.
Interest generation – where you communicate what you can do for the company and why hiring you would be a smart move. Generally, this will be in the form of a possible opportunity to repeat something you’ve already achieved elsewhere.
Qualification – where you and the interviewer determine whether or not there is a good fit between what you have to offer and what the company needs. This is usually the place in the interview when you can ask questions of the interviewer and learn more about the organization and its culture. Be thoughtful, though, and don’t ask so many questions it becomes tiresome.
Strengths review – which is where you summarize what you have to offer.
The close – where you determine whether or not they are seriously considering you. As you express an interest in moving forward, the interviewer will usually give you a specific time-frame for their follow up. If the interviewer is vague and inconclusive in this phase, that generally indicates they do not intend taking your application any further.
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
When an interviewer is meeting with a candidate for a job, there are eight character traits he or she looks for:

Self-confidence. Employers want people who are confident about their skills. Generally, experience breeds confidence. If you don’t have experience to point to, make up for it through preparation, enthusiasm and drive.
Well organized. If you have prepared for the interview by writing down some notes beforehand, that’s good. It shows you think ahead and organize your thoughts – desirable qualities for an employee. Don’t hesitate to refer to your notes during an interview.
Personable. The more you smile during the interview, the better. The interviewer will take note of people who are cheerful and friendly because that’s the way most employers want their customers to be treated.
Strong work ethic. If you say to the interviewer you’re happy to work 40-hours a week but no more, they will be less impressed than if you say you are flexible and willing to work whatever hours are required to get the job done.
Efficient. Employers want people who will be smart in how they approach their responsibilities. They want employees who know how to get things done.
Creative. A creative employee will take a job description and add their own ideas on how to expand what gets done. If you can demonstrate a willingness to think about new ways of getting the job done, that will be worthwhile.
Goal-oriented. If you’re good at setting goals and then working to achieve those goals, mention that. The top performers in any organization will usually be intensely goal-oriented. If you demonstrate this quality, it will be good for your prospects. Be prepared to talk about your long-term goals with the interviewer.
Problem-solver. Most companies want their employees to have some input into the workplace. They welcome new ideas for streamlining processes or solving problems. Therefore, if you can show your ability as a problem-solver, this will give you an edge.
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
Think about the questions they are likely to ask you. Give some thought to how you can memorably answer the questions they are most likely to ask you:

Why are you interested in this position?
What are your strengths?
What is your biggest weakness?
Why do you feel you are right for this position?
What are your personal career highlights?
Why did you choose your major?
What are your short and long term goals?
What are your personal interests?
How do your friends and family describe you?
What motivates you to succeed?
What is your ideal job?
What traits are you looking for in a job?
What has been your greatest personal challenge?
Can you give me an example of your teamwork skills?
Why should I hire you over all the other candidates?
Why are you leaving your current position?
What did you earn last year?
What are your compensation expectations?
What motivates you?
What discourages you?
What do you like most about your current position?
What do you like the least about your current position?
Do you work better in teams or alone?
How do you define success?
What is you greatest achievement to date?
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
The date and address goes here.

Dear Mr. Jones,
I am applying for the position of Customer Service Manager which was advertised in the Wall Street Journal on ... .

I have worked for several years as an Assistant CustomerService Manager at ABC Inc. While there, I have helpedincrease customer’satisfaction levels by 40-percent and reduced customer complaints by 33-percent. I would be pleased to explain how this was achieved to you.

I would also welcome the opportunity to discuss with you how I would hope to become an asset to your company. If you have any questions, please contact me by phone at ... . I will contact you next week to follow up on this letter and possibly schedule a time to meet with you.

Thanks for your time.

Your name and signature goes here.
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
Your name should be at the top of each page of your resume.

Profile - a quick snapshot of who you are and what you have to offer a prospective employer.
Expertise - Your areas of knowledge, know-how, skills and professional interests.
Experience - who you have worked for, the periods you were employed and a few bullet points on what you personally achieved for each previous employer.
Recognition - any awards, achievements, or accomplishments which were recognized by others.
Education - colleges, university degrees, training courses, professional groups you belong to.
References - available upon request.
arunassafarovhas quoted5 years ago
Is concise – at most two pages.
Is factual – since filling it with opinions and essays will deter rather than attract the attention of interviewers.
Brings your background to life – through the use of action-oriented words such as negotiated, directed, achieved, increased, reduced, generated, strengthened, etc.
Is easy-to-read – with bullet points and short, succinct statements rather than long paragraphs.
May be organized chronologically or functionally – depending on your specific background and experiences. (Chronological works best for people with a good work history whereas functional is best if there are extended periods where you did not work).
Leaves out what you did 15- or 20-years ago – and highlights your most recent and most impressive accomplishments.
Contains information which is relevant to the position being applied for – and avoids other bits of information that won’t have any significance – like your interests or hobbies.
Is sensible – for example, doesn’t ask for executive-level compensation in an application for an entry-level position. (Even better, your resume should not even include any indication as to your past compensation history. Nor should it list your weaknesses).
Has been proofread by someone who is experienced in this area – and who can point out any obvious spelling or grammatical errors.
Is Internet-ready – so it can be submitted by e-mail if the company prefers. (This will also require your formatting to be simple which is good).
Offers references upon request – rather than including them right at the outset. Most companies will prefer to speak with you before they look at your references. Do have available an accurate and up-to-date list of work and personal references. Take this with you to your interview.
Is attractive– being printed with a high quality laser printer on bond paper so as to project a professional image. Don’t use so many fonts the end result looks messy. Remember, your resume is your advertisement, so you want it to make a good initial impression and encourage the company to schedule an interview.
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