Thomas Henry Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley

In 1825, Thomas Henry Huxley was born in England. Huxley coined the term "agnostic" (although George Holyoake also claimed that honor). Huxley defined agnosticism as a method, "the essence of which lies in the rigorous application of a single principle . . . the axiom that every man should be able to give a reason for the faith that is in him." Huxley elaborated: "In matters of the intellect, follow your reason as far as it will take you, without any other consideration. And negatively, in matters of the intellect do not pretend that conclusions are certain which are not demonstrated or demonstrable" (from his essay "Agnosticism").Huxley received his medical degree from Charing Cross School of Medicine, becoming a physiologist, and was awarded many other honorary degrees. He spent his youth exploring science, especially zoology and anatomy, lecturing on natural history, and writing for scientific publications. He was president of the Royal Society, and was elected to the London School Board in 1870, where he championed a number of common-sense reforms. Huxley earned the nickname "Darwin's Bulldog" when he debated Darwin's On the Origin of Species with Bishop Samuel Wilberforce in Oxford in 1860. When Wilberforce asked him which side of his family contained the ape, Huxley famously replied that he would prefer to descend from an ape than a human being who used his intellect "for the mere purpose of introducing ridicule into grave scientific discussion." Thereafter, Huxley devoted his time to the defense of science over religion. His essays included "Agnosticism and Christianity" (1889). His three rationalist grandsons were Sir Julian Huxley, a biologist, novelist Aldous Huxley, and Andrew Huxley, co-winner of a 1963 Nobel Prize. Huxley, appropriately, received the Darwin Medal in 1894. D. 1895.More: http://freethoughtalmanac.com/?p=2093http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_H...http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic...http://www.iep.utm.edu/huxley/http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/lib...http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/t...http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/ev...
Thomas Henry Huxley
Evo­lu­tion of The­ol­ogy: an An­thro­po­log­i­cal Study
Thomas Henry Huxley
Dis­courses / Bi­o­log­i­cal and Ge­o­log­i­cal Es­says
Thomas Henry Huxley
Yeast
Thomas Henry Huxley
Yeast
  • 3
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
The Ad­vance of Sci­ence in the Last Half-Cen­tury
Thomas Henry Huxley
On the Study of Zo­ol­ogy
Thomas Henry Huxley
On the Study of Zoology
  • 4
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Sci­ence & Ed­u­ca­tion
Thomas Henry Huxley
Science & Education
  • 5
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Ori­gin of Species
Thomas Henry Huxley
Origin of Species
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
The Dar­win­ian Hy­poth­e­sis
Thomas Henry Huxley
The Darwinian Hypothesis
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Evo­lu­tion and Ethics
Thomas Henry Huxley
Evolution and Ethics
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Crit­i­cism on "The ori­gin of species"
Thomas Henry Huxley
Criticism on "The origin of species"
  • 2
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
The Rise and Progress of Palaeon­tol­ogy
Thomas Henry Huxley
The Rise and Progress of Palaeontology
  • 3
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Au­to­bi­og­ra­phy and Se­lected Es­says
Thomas Henry Huxley
Autobiography and Selected Essays
  • 2
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
The In­ter­preters of Gen­e­sis and the In­ter­preters of Na­ture
Thomas Henry Huxley
Ev­i­dence as to Man's Place in Na­ture
Thomas Henry Huxley
Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Lec­tures on Evo­lu­tion
Thomas Henry Huxley
Lectures on Evolution
  • 2
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
On the Ad­vis­able­ness of Im­prov­ing Nat­ural Knowl­edge
Thomas Henry Huxley
Coral and Coral Reefs
Thomas Henry Huxley
Coral and Coral Reefs
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
Thomas Henry Huxley
Method By Which the Causes of the Pre­sent and Past Con­di­tions of Or­ganic Na­ture Are to Be Dis­cov­ered — the Orig­i­na­tion of Liv­ing Be­ings
Thomas Henry Huxley
Con­di­tions of Ex­is­tence as Af­fect­ing the Per­pet­u­a­tion of Liv­ing Be­ings
Thomas Henry Huxley
Cri­tiques and Ad­dresses
Thomas Henry Huxley
Critiques and Addresses
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Free
fb2epub
Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once)