David Bloomer
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David Bloomer
David Bloomershared an impression2 years ago
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David Bloomer
David Bloomershared an impression2 years ago
👍Worth reading

David Bloomer
David Bloomershared an impression2 years ago
👍Worth reading

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David Bloomer
David Bloomerhas quoted2 years ago
There is, to be sure, a theological illusion abroad . . . which conveys the impression that, with the Holy Scriptures in hand, one can independently construct theology. . . . This illusion is a denial of the historic and organic character of theology, and for this reason is inwardly untrue. No theologian following the direction of his own compass would ever have found by himself what he now confesses and defends on the ground of Holy Scripture. By far the largest part of his results is adopted by him from theological tradition, and even the proofs he cites from Scripture, at least as a rule, have not been discovered by himself, but have been suggested to him by his predecessors.
David Bloomer
David Bloomerhas quoted2 years ago
Although these churches did not subscribe to creeds and confessions, they were in many ways more committed to orthodox doctrines than many churches that recited them each week. This tradition mediated to me, mostly informally, a basic familiarity with the Bible and a living knowledge of the gospel of salvation by grace, through faith in Christ. Yet this tradition was also the product of the Radical Reformation, pietism, and American revivalism. So the emphases of the Reformers, such as Luther and Calvin, sat uncomfortably alongside the more Arminian — even Semi-Pelagian and outright Pelagian — emphases of Charles Finney and Benjamin Franklin. It was the tradition of a distinctly American revivalism with its curious mixture of separatism and civil religion
David Bloomer
David Bloomerhas quoted2 years ago
There is a problem with our pursuit of the next great experience, our attempts to feed our insatiable appetite for significance. Like excellence and action, happiness needs a worthy object. The pursuit of happiness as an end in itself is “vanity,” as we learn from the book of Ecclesiastes. Philosophers call it the “hedonist paradox”: the irony that the pursuit of pleasure actually chases it away. “Happiness is like a cat,” writes William Bennett. “If you try to coax it or call it, it will avoid you; it will never come. But if you pay no attention to it and go about your business, you’ll find it rubbing against your legs and jumping into your lap.”23 Happiness is something that happens when you’re looking for someone or something other than happiness. You can’t find meaning, fulfillment, or purpose by looking for it, but only by discovering something else. And that discovery comes with careful discernment, which takes time, intentionality, and community.
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